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How Addicting is Heroin?

When people talk about commonly abused drugs, heroin always comes up. However, not many people are aware of the dangers associated with this drug. It might sound like exaggeration, but heroin is so powerful and addictive that just about everyone who tries it develops dependence.

What is heroin?

Heroin, also called diamorphine, is an opiate that produces major euphoric effects. It is not Heroin Drug Rehabused medically for pain relief, and is considered a schedule I controlled substance by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). Heroin has rapid onset of action, and effects last 1-3 hours.

Why is heroin so addictive?

Because there is not much research involving heroin, it is hard for experts to explain just how addicting the drug can be. Heroin targets the pleasure centers of the brain, which increase the release of dopamine (a feel-good brain chemical). This makes the user crave the drug in the future. Many people who take heroin recreationally find that they quickly transform to full drug use, which is compulsive and impossible to control.

How does heroin affect the brain?

An addiction is a psychological and physical need for a drug, which surpasses the user’s ability to control. The brain changes start in the tiny neurons and brain cells. Research shows that heroin impacts main portions of the brain that lead to follow-up use. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, brain receptors for heroin are located in the areas of the brain responsible for perception of pain and reward. This means that when a person uses heroin, he feels no pain and only euphoria.

Why do users require more heroin over time?

After using heroin for weeks or months, it taxes and stresses the brain cells. If the drug is presented in the body over and over, the brain cells become burned out and fatigued. The user requires more heroin to combat the burn out, which over time, means the user uses large doses.

How bad is heroin addiction in the U.S.?

According to statistics, 17 million people used heroin and other opiates in 2015 alone. These drugs accounted for the deaths of 122,000 Americans. The number of heroin users has significantly increased from 1998 to 2015, with 2% of Americans reporting using heroin at some point in time. In 2013, the rate of overdose deaths related to heroin had quadrupled from 1998 statistics.

Which modes of heroin use are more addictive?

Heroin impacts the brain, which affects addictiveness level. The method of use may contribute to addictiveness also. Heroin users who become addicted use the drug by:

  • Smoking
  • Snorting
  • Injecting

These methods allow the heroin to hit the body in increased amounts, so the user is overpowered with a euphoric feeling. Rather than feeling slightly euphoric, the users are vaulted into a realm of numbness and high that tends to make the heroin more addictive than opiates taken oral route. Research shows that addiction rates among heroin abusers tends to vary depending on the mode of use. Those who inject the drug have higher rates of addiction and overdose deaths than those who smoke or snort the drug.

How does heroin use cause a person problems?

Heroin is an illegal drug and overdose is common. People who use heroin along with alcohol have an increased chance for death due to overdose. IV drug use is associated with long-term viral infections, such as hepatitis B or C, or HIV. In addition, using heroin causes unemployment, car accidents, legal problems, and social/personal conflicts.

Who is most at risk for heroin addiction?

Everyone who tries heroin has the risk for becoming addicted. Heroin addiction is higher among:

  • Non-Hispanic whites
  • Males
  • Those addicted to opioid prescription drugs
  • People addicted to cocaine
  • Individuals between ages of 18 and 25 years
  • People using alcohol and/or marijuana
  • Those living in a large metropolitan area

Pacific Bay Recovery is the top prescription and illicit drug rehab center in San Diego and all of Southern California. The long term success rates are extremely high and most insurance is accepted. Call us today!

Resources

National Institute on Drug Abuse (2016). What is heroin? https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/heroin

Rural America and Prescription Drug Addiction

Rural America is the heartland of our great country. In rural America, you have coal mining, corn fields, cattle ranches, vegetable farms, steel mill work, and now, prescription drug addiction. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), rural America is being hit hard with prescription drug addiction, with an estimated 2.1 million people suffering from some type of prescription drug abuse and addiction in 2012 alone.

The National Institutes of Health reports that prescription drug addiction has been plaguing rural America for the last 2 decades. The abuse to heroin and prescription pain relievers affects 36 million people worldwide. The number of unintentional overdose deaths has soared in the U.S., thanks to prescription drugs. Based on data from NIDA, the number of overdose deaths has quadrupled in the last 15 years, since OxyContin burst on the scene in 1998.

Scope and Impact of Prescription Opioid Drug Use

To address the complex problem of prescription opioid abuse in the U.S., researchers analyzed the special characteristics of this phenomenon. NIDA evaluated the negative and growing impact of prescription drug abuse on health and mortality, but also assessed the fundamental role played by prescription opioids in healing and relieving human suffering. Prescription opioids fall into one of three broad categories, with the other prescription drugs abused being central nervous system depressants (Xanax, Valium, and Klonopin) and stimulants (Adderall, Concerta, and Ritalin).

Several factors contribute to the severity of America’s current prescription drug addiction and abuse problem. These factors have helped create the “environmental availability” of prescription drugs, particularly opioids. These factors include:

  • Increases in the number of prescriptions written
  • Aggressive marketing by pharmaceutical companies
  • Greater social acceptance for using prescription medications

The Cold, Hard Drug Facts

The total number of opioid painkillers prescribed in the U.S. have increased over the last 25 Oxycodoneyears. In 1991, only 76 million prescriptions of hydrocodone and oxycodone were written. Zoom in to 2015, there were 207 million hydrocodone and oxycodone prescriptions written in America. This accounts for around 90% of the world’s hydrocodone scripts and 81% of oxycodone scripts.

Based on data from NIDA, emergency departments (EDs or ERs) are dispensing more prescription pain medicines also. In 2008, the number of visits for nonmedical use of opioid analgesics increased to 306,000 up from 145,000 in 2004 (that’s 156,000 more visits per year).Overdose deaths related to prescription painkillers have tripled in the last two decades, with 16,650 in 2010 alone. By 2002, death certificates listing opioid poisoning as the cause of death were more common than cocaine or heroin.

Crushing, Snorting, Injecting, and Combining

Opioid prescription drugs, as well as stimulants and benzodiazepines, can be crushed and snorted for a faster “high.” Certain pure drugs, like morphine or oxycodone, can be mixed with water and injected into the veins. These drugs are more dangerous when snorted or injected. In addition, the drugs can be combined with alcohol for a stronger, more intense euphoria.

Rural Americans have turned visiting the doctor into hillbilly gold, as doctor shopping, obtaining scripts to sell, and visiting random ERs has become a common thing. More than 100 million people have chronic pain in the U.S., but for many of these people, the drugs are stolen, sold, or misused. Experts have long debated the use of prescription opioids for chronic pain relief. Because the problem has become an epidemic, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed specific prescribing guidelines for doctors to follow.

Pacific Bay Recovery offers top prescription drug rehab in San Diego with success rates that are very high. Most insurance is accepted, call us today!

Hooked: Statistics on Prescription Narcotic Use/Abuse

America is “hooked.” Not on soda pop. Not on daytime TV. Not even on phonics. Americans are starting to use prescription narcotics at increased rates, up 400% over the last 10 years. These drugs include painkillers, stimulants, benzodiazepines, and barbiturates.

Hook, Line, and a Sinking America

In the U.S., 2,500 youth ages 12 to 17 abuse a prescription pain medicine for the first time. Prescription drug use is more prevalent in the U.S. than other countries. In America, more Oxycodonethan 15 million people abuse prescription drugs each year, which is more than all other drugs combined. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, in 2015, more than 2.6 million Americans abused prescription drugs for the first time.

According to a 2007 survey, 3.3% of 12- to 17-year olds used or abused a prescription drug during the past 30 days. Of those aged 18- to 25-year old, 6% reported using a prescription drug in the past month. Prescription drug abuse also caused a large percentage of deaths in America, based on 2005 statistics. Of the 22,400 drug overdose deaths, 38% were related to opioid painkillers.

Teenage Wasteland

America is becoming a teenage wasteland, according to statistics from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). In 2005, 4,4 million teens in the U.S. admitted to using prescription opioid painkillers. In addition, 2.3 million teens reported that they took a prescription stimulant, such as Adderall or Ritalin. Another 2.2 million youth admitted to abusing over-the-counter cough syrup, many trying it as young as 13 years of age.

In a U.S survey, almost 50% of teens reported that they thought prescription drugs were safer than illegal street drugs. Around 65% of teens surveyed said that they found prescription drugs in their families’ home medicine cabinets. The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University found that teens who abuse prescription drugs were twice as likely to drink alcohol, and were five times more likely to smoke marijuana. In addition, teens who start taking prescription drugs are 20 times more likely to turn to heroin, cocaine, and Ecstasy.

Dying to Be High

dual diagnosis treatmentAccording to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, opioids, depressants, and antidepressants are responsible for 45% of all overdose deaths. Prescription stimulants and cocaine account for 39% of all overdose deaths in the U.S. Also, in America, the most overdose deaths occur in inner cities in Black neighborhoods, but overdose deaths are on the rise in White rural communities. Of the 1.4 million drug-related hospital ER admissions in 2005, almost 600,000 were associated with prescription narcotics.

In 2007, the powerful prescription narcotic fentanyl killed more than 1,000 people, according to the Drug Enforcement Agency. This drug is 50 times more powerful than heroin, and 100 times more deadly. People are stealing it from cancer patients, pharmacies, and hospitals, and chewing the gel lining that is supposed to be time-released when applied to the skin.

Most Commonly Abused Prescription Narcotics

The number one most commonly abused prescription narcotic is the opioid drugs, such as oxycodone, hydrocodone, morphine, and hydromorphone. These drugs are usually given after a major injury or surgery, but are also prescribed for chronic pain. Another commonly abused prescription drug class is the central nervous system depressants, which are called tranquilizers or sedatives (Xanax, Valium, Seconal, and Neurontin). When taken with alcohol, CNS depressants can lead to overdose deaths due to respiratory depression.

In a study conducted at the University of Michigan, hydrocodone (Vicodin) was the top prescription drug abused among high schoolers. This study found that it represented 8% of all drugs used, but stimulants rated at 6.5%. Teens have access to stimulants, because they are often given in this age group for attention deficit disorder (ADD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). These drugs, when abused, produced a high, but they also lead to rapid heart rate, high blood pressure, and major anxiety.

Pacific Bay Recovery offers first rate treatment for prescription drug abuse at a top notch facility in San Diego. Success rates are impressive, with long term success being over 80%! Call us today for your best option for prescription drug rehab in Southern California.

Resources

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2017). Therapeutic drug use. Retrieved from:  https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/drug-use-therapeutic.htm

National Institute on Drug Abuse (2017). Drug-related hospital emergency room visits. Retrieved from:  https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/drug-related-hospital-emergency-room-visits

National Institute on Drug Abuse (2017). Nationwide trends. Retrieved from: https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/nationwide-trends

The Facts on Fentanyl

Fentanyl is a drug that has been around a while, but just now is becoming abused. This drug is a powerful synthetic opioid that is prescribed under the brand names Duragesic, Actiq, and Sublimaze. Here are some facts about fentanyl.

About the Drug

Fentanyl is similar to the opioid morphine, but it is actually 100 times more potent. The drug fentanyl is a schedule II prescription drug that is only given to patients with severe, intractable pain. Street names for fentanyl are GoodFella, Jackpot, Friend, Dance Fever, China Girl, China White, Apache, Murder 8, TNT, and Tango & Cash.

How People use Fentanyl

When prescribed by a doctor, fentanyl is administered via transdermal patch, injection, or in lozenges. However, fentanyl and its analogs associated with overdoses have been produced in clandestine laboratories. Nonpharmaceutical fentanyl is sold as a power, spiked on blotter paper, as tablets that mimic other opioids, or mixed with or substituted for heroin. Because drug dealers are now manufacturing fentanyl, people can snort, swallow, or inject the synthetic drug.

How Fentanyl Patches are Abused

Duragesic patches are abused by people who just wish to get high. People who abuse fentanyl are not in pain. The fentanyl patches contain a gel in a pouch lying between two membranes. The abuser will eat the fentanyl gel, giving them a big dose all at once. Many fentanyl abusers steal the patches from a friend, family member, or person in his/her care, and then apply them to their skin or eat the gel.

Who Abuses Fentanyl

Fentanyl abuse can occur when a person exaggerates his/her pain in order to get a prescription from the doctor. An injured person could pretend to be in great pain just to get fentanyl. Physicians may over-prescribe fentanyl by giving the patient the medication when he/she does not need it, or for longer than he/she requires the drug. In addition, healthcare and pharmacy workers can become addicted to or abuse fentanyl, because they have access to prescriptions and medications.

How Fentanyl affects your Brain

Fentanyl works by binding with the body’s natural opioid receptors, which are located in areas of the brain that control emotions and pain. Like morphine and heroin, fentanyl has a high addiction potential. When opioid drugs bind to the body’s opioid receptors, they drive up dopamine levels in reward area, which produces a state of relaxation and euphoria. The effects of fentanyl also include confusion, nausea, vomiting, constipation, drowsiness, sedation, addiction, tolerance, respiratory depression, unconsciousness, coma, and with overdose, death.

What Makes Fentanyl Dangerous

Fentanyl is a dangerous drug when used recreationally. Opioid receptors found in the brain control breathing rate. When fentanyl is consumed or absorbed in high doses, it can cause your breathing to completely stop. This is especially true when a the drug user is not aware of what he/she is taking. Fentanyl sold on the street poses many dangers, as it amplifies the potency of heroin and cocaine.

The Drug Abuse/Use Problem in America

According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), 39 million people in the U.S. have used prescription drugs for non-medical purposes. That’s roughly 10% of the entire population. Of those who abuse drugs, teens and adolescents make up 3 million of them.

Signs and Symptoms of Fentanyl Abuse

There are a number of signs and symptoms that alert you that someone you know, love, and wish to help is abusing fentanyl. These signs and symptoms include:

  • Difficulty seeingDetox Center San Diego
  • Depression
  • Loss of appetite
  • Itching
  • Nausea and/or vomiting
  • Retention of urine
  • Dry mouth
  • Pin-point pupils (constriction)
  • Sweating
  • Hallucinations
  • Bad dreams
  • Weight loss

Pacific Bay Recovery is the top drug rehab center in Southern California, offering first rate treatment for both prescription and illicit drugs. Most insurance is accepted at the San Diego drug rehab center, call us today!

Resources

Higashikawa Y, Suzuki S. Studies on 1-(2-phenethyl)-4-(N-propionylanilino) piperidine (fentanyl) and its related compounds. VI. Structure-analgesic activity relationship for fentanyl, methyl-substituted fentanyls and other analogues. Forensic Toxicol. 2008;26(1):1-5. doi:10.1007/s11419-007-0039-1.

Nelson L, Schwaner R. Transdermal fentanyl: Pharmacology and toxicology. J Med Toxicol. 2009;5(4):230-241. doi:10.1007/BF03178274.

Volpe DA, Tobin GAM, Mellon RD, et al. Uniform assessment and ranking of opioid Mu receptor binding constants for selected opioid drugs. Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 2011;59(3):385-390. doi:10.1016/j.yrtph.2010.12.007.

Medical Marijuana: A Safer Solution to Opioids?

Drug overdose is a major problem in the United States. Illicit and prescription drug abuse have plagued our country for years, and now, the statistics apply to professional athletes. In a recent survey of more than 150 NFL players, use of chemical opioids was extremely common and encouraged by some league physicians. The addiction qualities of opioid painkillers are basically a Russian Roulette for some pain sufferers, however.

The Problem

Opioids are a class of drugs that include prescription pain relievers and heroin. These drugs act on the opioid receptors in the brain to produce a pleasurable effect along with pain relief. More than 20 million Americans had some type of substance use disorder in 2015, and opioid addiction is causing many overdose deaths. The opioid overdose death rate in 2008 was four times what it was in 1999, and there were 20,000 deaths due to prescription opioids in 2015 alone.

According to the 2017 survey involving current and former NFL players, 91% said they had taken an opiate-based pain reliever. In addition, almost half of those surveyed said they felt pressure by teammates, staff, and even team doctors to use a chemical substance for pain. Many players admitted to recreational use of opioids after they first took them by prescription.

The Cause

Opioids are the fastest and strongest form of pain management available to NFL players. The NFL physicians can injection painkillers directly to the affected region for quick pain relief, which permits the player to go right back to the field. These opioids have a laundry list of side effects, however. They can cause dizziness, confusion, nausea, vomiting, and respiratory depression. In addition, they are extremely addictive, with 70% of NFL players reporting being concerned to an unhealthy dependence on the drugs.

In 2012, the NFL Players Association had an injury data analysis conducted. They found that there was an increase of 1,302 total injuries from 2010 to 2011. In 2011 alone, there were 4,493 minor injuries in the NFL, which included the start of training camp through the Super Bowl. In addition, there was a 17% increase in moderate injuries, which means the player was out of action for 8-21 days.  

An Alternative Solution

The nation’s largest medical marijuana online marketplace, BudTrader.com, conducted a lengthy study regarding NFL players and opioid addiction potential. The study evolved after the marketplace’s CEO, Brad McLaughlin, was notified of the problem by former NFL player Marvin Washington. According to the report, Washington is an advocated for a safer form of pain management: use of medical marijuana. Washington believes professional football players could benefit from the unique compounds found in marijuana, which protect the brain against pain and inflammation.

According to the NFL survey, 89% of NFL players felt that medical marijuana was a safe alternative to treating injury pain. These players said that fewer chemical opioids would be used if they had access to medical marijuana. According to authorities, this would call for major policy reform within the league. The NFLPA plans to make medical cannabis a priority in the future, however.

Pacific Bay Recovery offers top rehab in Southern California for prescription and illicit drugs. Success rates are very high and most insurance is accepted, call  us today!

Resources

Alternet (2017). Recent Poll Shows NFL Players Are Increasingly Concerned About Opioid Use and Addiction. Retrieved from: http://www.alternet.org/drugs/nfl-players-are-increasingly-concerned-about-opioids

American Society of Addiction Medicine (2016). Opioid Addiction. Retrieved from: http://www.asam.org/docs/default-source/advocacy/opioid-addiction-disease-facts-figures.pdf

Extended Care vs. Long-Term Drug and Alcohol Rehab

Abuse of tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drugs is estimated to cost the U. S. over $600 billion annually related to lost work productivity, crime, and healthcare. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there are approximatelyalcohol rehab 79,000 deaths each year in the U.S. related to excessive alcohol consumption, and it is the leading cause of death for teens and young adults. The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) reports that there were over 2 million emergency department visits related to substance abuse, with 27 percent being related to the non-medical use of pharmaceutical drugs, and 21 percent related to illicit drug use.

Extended care drug and alcohol rehabilitation (rehab) programs are initiated once a person completes inpatient treatment. Long-term drug and alcohol rehab is for the person who needs continuous support with no completion date. Recovery for individuals in long-term care is usually life-long. Both types of rehab are for the addict who requires additional support upon discharge. Some of the differences include:

  • Completion dates – Extended care has one, whereas long-term does not.
  • Freedom and accountability – Extended care has more freedom and less accountability as compared to long-term.drug rehab
  • Success rates – Long-term facilities have higher success rates than extended care, as they permit the client to receive more therapy. If the client does not have enough time to devote to sober living, the chances of relapse are around 80 percent.

Extended Care Defined

Extended care drug rehabilitation involves lengthy stays at treatment centers that exceed the traditional 30-, 60-, and 90-day cycles. This also refers to post treatment methodologies, which are set up to assist the addict to remain drug- and/or alcohol-free. There are several types of extended care, but the most common are:

  • 12-step and peer support groups – These programs offer the recovering addict ongoing, regular chances for support when dealing with addiction. As they only require voluntary attendance, these programs use mentors and sponsors to encourage the recovering addict. Participation allows the support to be a big aspect of the recovering addict’s life.
  • Outpatient treatment – Some people are referred to outpatient therapy after finishing an inpatient treatment course. This involves participation in a 12-step program, and usually regular meetings with licensed therapists and counselors in a group or individual setting. This form of treatment is typically open-ended and length of therapy is based on recovery state.
  • Private therapy – Extended care often requires regular visits to a psychologist, counselor, or other mental health professional. These one-on-one sessions give the addict support so he or she can cope with circumstances and situations that spur relapse.
  • Sober concepts – A sober concepts program gives an addict the opportunity for a structured living environment, and helps the participant learn the skills necessary for a sober lifestyle. Sober living principles give mentoring and guidance for the recovering addict in a one-on-one counseling situation.

Long Term Treatment Defined

Long-term treatment centers are known for high success rates for those who suffer from severe addiction or struggle with Drug Rehabrecurrent relapse. These therapy programs provide detoxification (detox), reintegration into society, and complete psychological and physical assessments. The most successful long-term program has no release date, and treatment occurs in a modern and comfortable setting. Long-term treatment programs offer:

  • Full staff participation in the addict’s recovery process
  • 24-hour assistance and behavior monitoring
  • Programs designed to meet an individual’s unique needs
  • Access to multiple therapy methods

A long-term treatment program is best for someone who has not had success in 30-, 60-, or 90-day programs, and for those who have had chronic relapse. Extended care programs are best for people who have completed the first program and believe they are ready to live in their previous environment again.

Pacific Bay Recovery offers several addiction treatment program options for those dealing with a substance abuse issue. This includes both prescription and illicit drug abuse, along with alcohol abuse too. Detox is offered, along with inpatient treatment and PHP with intensive outpatient programs. Call for a free consultation, we’d love to help you!

Facts on Alcohol and Drug Detox from a San Diego Addiction Center

Many people go through detoxification (detox), whether it is related to alcohol or drugs. It is a fact you can die from alcohol detox, due to the lack of the alcohol chemical the body has been used to for some time. Going through this alcohol detox, canstockphoto43350234around 5 percent of all heavy alcoholics will die. This is significant number, especially considering that 2.5 million alcoholics seek substance abuse treatment each year in America alone.

Drug detox some great findings would be 70 percent is the highest among patients discharged from hospital residential treatment center, detox at 67% and short term residential treatments follows at 59%.  The treatment competition rates were much lower in long term and or less structured settings at 44% and outpatient came in at 40%.

     Differences between Alcohol and Drug Detox

With these statistics in mind, we need to now look at the difference between alcohol and drug detoxification. The two processes are similar but different in the actual way they are conducted by centers. Both can be done at a residential facility where the patient is detoxed in a few days and under medical supervision.

In some cases, detox is done with medical prescription drugs to help with the withdrawal symptoms. These withdrawal symptoms include seizures, headaches, physical shakes, depression, emotional mood swings, outbursts, fatigue, and a heart attack. The differences with the detox between alcohol and drugs would involve the approach of the treatments, as well as the method used by the counselor who gives you therapy and counseling. 

Drug Detox San DiegoThe cravings and triggers for drugs and alcohol are different, so the therapy and coping skills are taught and presented differently to the individuals and to the groups. Drug detox will get rid of all the toxins in your body that accumulate from the drugs. This helps your body adjust slowly back to normal. Detox will also get rid of the alcohol toxins, as well, but you have to be aware that by medically detoxing doesn’t come without side effects. Some individuals who take methadone and Suboxone never stop taking the drug, or they completely relapse to their drug of choice. So, choosing the right treatment and center is crucial to your success.

Holistic Detox Approach

Some success in drug and alcohol abuse has been seen by centers taking a holistic approach to detoxification. These facilities use programs that exercise regiments, nutritional programs, and saunas, as sweating the toxins from the body naturally freeing the toxins from the body. After completing the holistic approach to detox, many patients report that they have reduced cravings for drugs. They feel happier, are more alert, and think clearer, giving them a stronger will to continue the next steps in the rehab program and getting on their way to a happier healthier drug free life without addiction.

Pacific Bay Recovery offers exceptional drug and alcohol detox programs along with rehab programs that are effective and long lasting. Call us today to find out about the best addiction treatment center in San Diego!

Resources

DrugsRehabs.info  (2014). Alcohol Information and detox facts and myths. Retrieved from: http:www.drugrehabs.info/alcohol-info-and-resources/alcohol-      detox-facts-and-myths/

SAMHSA (2014). A Life in the community for everyone . Retrieved from: http:www.samhsa.gov/samhsanewletter/Volume_17_Number_4/TreatmentDischarges.aspx

90-Day Treatment Plan for Addiction in San Diego

This is a longer term commitment for those heavily addicted to drug and/ or alcohol who may need more time to get sober from their years of long term abuse of alcohol and drugs. These addicts have developed habits that they need to learn how to break and re-learn new healthy ones to replace them with the assistancealcohol rehab san diego  from the addiction professionals and counselors in the program to teach you how to stay clean and sober for the long term life recovery.

Most all 90 day plans have an inpatient or outpatient program but the inpatient programs have a higher chance of success.  Most outpatients plans are designed for the addicted individual who cannot leave there current obligations for this extended amount of time.

The longer plan is designed for the recovering drug addict or alcoholic to build a long term foundation for their life being sober. Many that have failed with sobriety and relapsed during the 30 and 60 day plans may choose this plan to continue learning other skills they did not get in the shorter plans like coping, refining social skills, developing meaningful relationships without the addiction.

Alcohol RecoveryThe 90 days treatment begins much like the 30 and 60 day treatments of intense detox, relieving the body of the toxins to bring the person back to the normal levels while getting the unhealthy chemicals out that could take up to two weeks.  This is done in a medically supervised environment by professionals to ensure that everyone is safe in case any side effects arise. After detox the rehabilitation begins with individual and group therapy sessions, this will be the communication and sharing the events that one has experienced. 

This also helps to communicate with others in the same position or maybe further along the treatment program to validate that this is not just happening to the addict.  In therapy, an addict will learn new skills to cope with their daily life issues using different types of therapies to help the addict physically and mentally and spiritually.  These therapies could be yoga therapy, sometimes this includes learning to have meditation time, yoga therapy helps with the mind and body to a line together. 

The 90 day plans will have you living on site while going through their treatment plans much like in the 60 day treatment plan. The addict will attend individual and group therapy sessions by trained substance abuse counselors who will teach you the Addiction Treatment Centerskills of recognizing and dealing with the triggers or situations.  Learn how to avoid them and recognize the ones that might lead you to a relapse. In group therapy sessions you will get support from others with addiction and who are going through the same daily challenges that you are dealing with.  This can involve some family sessions where the addict and the family members will learn how to trust each other again. The addict and family members will learn how to express their feelings and thoughts on a healthy level by including them in the recovery process.

Most all plans have different approaches but will include many of these method IGT integrated group therapy deals with the addicts that might have two problems one physical like addiction and behavioral like bipolar disordering a group setting. Some will use the 12 step program methods and /or scientific methods.

The 90 day treatment plan is the usual plans most addicts choose who are addicted to cocaine, heroin, alcohol, etc. This inpatient plan helps addicts to have hands on time with the medical and therapeutic staff 24 hours a day for 90 days.  These addictions did not occur overnight so learning new skills to not fall back into doing drugs or drink alcohol by learning more coping skills to add to their arsenal to live a sober and drug free life takes time, to become a normal skill or decision to choose on a daily basis.  90 days is a lifestyle change.

Pacific Bay Recovery offers top treatment for addiction in San Diego, including all types of substance abuse. Whether it’s prescription or illicit drug abuse, or alcohol, the treatment center provides compassionate, effective treatment that works well a vast majority of the time. Call us today for a free consultation to learn more!

 

Facts on Drug Rehab Treatment from a San Diego Addiction Treatment Center

Drug addiction, in most cases, goes untreated. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) National Survey on Drug and Health, 9.4 percent of the US population aged12 or older had to be treated for drug or Detox Center San Diegoalcohol abuse problem in 2007. Of those people surveyed, 2.4 million individuals (10.4 percent) needed treatment or received treatment at a specialty rehabilitation (rehab) center by addiction professionals.

Therefore, 20.8 million people (8.4 percent of the US population 12 or older) needed to be treated for a drug or alcohol abuse problem and probably didn’t receive it. This survey is available online at www.samhsa.gov and from NIDA at 877-643-2644.

Addiction – A Treatable Disease

Addiction is a treatable disease that affects the body and brain in many ways. All treatments aren’t for every person, so you must be assessed by addiction professionals on a continuing basis to make sure the treatment is working for you. However, treatment might need to be changed, depending on how you are responding. You may require therapy that is both medical and psychological, depending how you are doing. For most people that are addicted, they just can’t stop using because they want to. They will not feel good until the drugs are out of the system and the brain and body quits craving the substance.

Because of these drug cravings, some treatments professionals use legal medications to help with the process for the individual who is addicted to make them better without feeling sick. The drug detoxification (detox) treatment process does work for individuals who seek out treatment and stick to the plan can change. However, this process usually is long and hard. alcohol rehab san diego Relapse is inevitable in the beginning, but the main factor of success is to get right back on track with your treatment when relapse occurs Re-teaching oneself to do something different is hard when you have engaged in negative behavior for such a long time. You many slip up many times, but you need to stay the road and continue treatment for many years before you are better, especially when the life you led for a long time was centered on finding drugs and putting them into the body.

Costs of Drug Abuse

Substance abuse costs the U.S. $510 billion dollars each year, and these costs are related to specialty alcohol and drug services, medical consequences, lost productivity due to illness and injury, and legal costs. Research shows that for every dollar spent on prevention and early treatment programs, two to ten dollars could be saved in health costs, criminal and juvenile justice costs, educational costs, and lost productivity.

Treatment has been shown scientifically to help addicted patients of drugs abuse to avoiding relapse and recover their lives. What people learn during rehab treatment is to stay clear of drugs or alcohol by building positive healthy habits that help a person cope so they don’t relapse. Recovery is a long road, but it is possible.

Pacific Bay Recovery offers the best addiction treatment in San Diego. This includes all types of substance abuse such as alcohol, prescription drugs and illicit drugs as well. Call us today for help!

Resources

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). Drug Facts: Treatment Approaches for Drug Addiction. Retrieved from: http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/treatment-approaches-drug-addiction.

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) (2014). Justification of Estimates for Appropriations Committee. Retrieved from: http://www.samhsa.gov/Budget/FY2012/SAMHSA-FY11CJ.pdf

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