Call today to schedule your free and confidential consultation.

(858) 263-9700

Call today to schedule your free and confidential consultation.

(858) 263-9700


Alcohol Addiction

Undergoing Medical Detoxification

The process of medical detoxification, or medical detox, is the first step in substance dependence and addiction which allows for an affected individual to adjust to a life without alcohol and/or drugs.

The process is performed slowly under the care and supervision of a trained and experienced healthcare professional. This is done to allow patients the opportunity to withdraw from their addictive substances without having to experience too severe withdrawal symptoms.

Withdrawal Symptoms

An important aspect to take note of is that every addiction is based on the individual and every withdrawal experience is different. Not everyone goes through the same withdrawal process and the severity of symptoms will depend on factors such as the type of drug used, the frequency of its use, how long the substance was used for, and if there is any underlying pathology.

The following are possible withdrawal symptoms that may be experienced depending on the substance that is abused:

  • Alcohol – fever, rapid heartbeat, and confusion.
  • Opioids/narcotics – excessive sweating, muscles aches, anxiety, abdominal discomfort, and agitation.
  • Methamphetamine – uncontrollable shaking, dry mouth, sweating, fatigue, and insomnia.
  • Cocaine – malaise, increased appetite, fatigue, and agitation.

Some other withdrawal symptoms that patients may experience can include:

  • Muscle tremors.
  • Depression.
  • Vomiting.
  • Diarrhea.

process is performed slowly under the care and supervision of a trained and experienced healthcare professional

Some patients may stop experiencing these issues after a few days or weeks, while others may end up struggling with symptoms that linger on for months. The period of time one may ultimately experience the withdrawal symptoms may last longer than anticipated without medical support and this can lead to relapsing back into bad habits.

Severe withdrawal symptoms that warrant definite medical intervention and support include:

  • Severe psychological distress.
  • Hallucinations.
  • Seizures or convulsions.

In the event of such issues, a medical detox administrator can ensure the safety of a patient and reduce the chances of a relapse.

How Does Medical Detox Work?

The following steps take place during a medical detoxification:

  • A trained medical practitioner will take charge over the entire withdrawal process starting with a patient’s history, current health status, and substance use history.
  • The patient will be examined and investigated further if required to rule out and manage any acute and/or chronic medical issues. Any fluid and electrolyte imbalances will also be managed here.
  • A custom detox process will be initiated for the patient to minimize the side effects of the withdrawal process as well as encourage a permanent state of recovery.
  • Depending on the substance that the patient is addicted to, tapering off the drug may be required in order to prevent any severe withdrawal effects from developing. This is especially important for substances such as alcohol, benzodiazepines, and methamphetamine.
  • Once the patients have their withdrawal symptoms under control, they will start to take part in other substance rehabilitation services such as psychotherapy and occupational therapy.

Without having to worry about physical and psychological symptoms of the withdrawal process, the patient can then start to focus on their mental health, long-term recovery plan to avoid relapses and to rebuild their lives and relationships with family members and friends.

Dual Diagnosis Treatment Centers California

Dual diagnosis is the medical term used to describe the presence of a mood condition such as depression or bipolar disorder together with a substance abuse problem in patients. An individual who is confirmed with dual diagnosis has two separate conditions and each one of these needs its own treatment plan.

Facts about Mood and Substance Abuse Disorders

  • They are both treatable conditions.
  • They are not characterized as character flaws or moral weaknesses.
  • The conditions can affect any person regardless of age, race, or financial background.
  • More than half of the individuals who are diagnosed with depression or bipolar mood disorders also use alcohol and/or drugs.

Mood Disorder Symptoms

Knowing the symptoms of a mood disorder can help one decide when to seek help for such a problem. Major depression can present with the following issues:

  • Excessive worrying.
  • Anxiety.
  • Feeling sad and being overly emotional.
  • Loss of energy or feeling constantly exhausted.
  • Excessive anger.
  • Unable to concentrate properly.
  • Lack of focus.
  • Not being able to enjoy activities that were once pleasurable.
  • Insomnia.
  • Lack of drive.
  • Not wanting to socialize with friends and family members anymore.
  • Having recurring thoughts of death or wanting to commit suicide.

Bipolar mood disorder is a mental health condition that is characterized by one’s mood switching between depression and mania. Manic symptoms include:

  • Having grandiose thoughts.
  • Increased irritability.
  • Increased mental and physical energy and activity.
  • Eliciting aggressive behavior.
  • Racing speech as well as having racing thoughts.
  • Being extremely optimistic and self-confident.
  • Being impulsive and making poor judgment calls.
  • Behaving recklessly by going on spending sprees, making major business decisions without consulting with others, sexual promiscuity, and driving dangerously.
  • Patients with severe cases of bipolar mood disorder may even become delusional and experience hallucinations.

Often times, individuals who struggle with mood disorders may use drugs and/or alcohol in order to mask the symptoms of the mental health conditions.

The Impact of Substance Use in Patients with Mental Health Conditions

At times, individuals who struggle with mood disorders may use drugs and/or alcohol in order to mask the symptoms of the mental health conditions.

A racing mind may be ‘calmed’ with an alcoholic drink or feelings of sadness can be alleviated with a stimulant drug. These substances may seem to help but, actually, make the situation worse for the patient. When the temporary effects of the substances wear off, the symptoms are often worse than before.

This causes the patient to use more of the substance which may eventually lead to dependence and addiction.

The Importance of Managing Mood Disorders and Substance Use

When neither of these issues is managed then one will make the other worse. If only one condition is addressed, then treatment will likely be less effective.

Therefore, it is very important for both illnesses to be managed effectively enough since this increases the chances for a complete and lasting recovery, which makes it easier for the affected individual to return to a full and productive life.

Pacific Bay Recovery Centers in California are equipped to manage patients who are suspected to have dual diagnosis. The rehabilitation facilities employ healthcare professionals who are trained and experienced in dealing with patients who are diagnosed with this condition.

Alcohol Abuse in the United States on the Rise

A JAMA Psychiatry article that was published in September 2017 has shown that Americans are consuming more alcohol than ever before. An estimated one out of every eight Americans which equates to around 30 million people, struggle with an alcohol disorder.

The study looked at the drinking patterns of around 40,000 individuals between 2002 and 2003 and compared it to that of people in 2012 and 2013. The findings were shocking, to say the least, especially in light of other substance abuse problems affecting the country such as the opioid epidemic.

Study Findings

The following findings were made in the study:

  • Alcohol use disorders rose by almost 50 percent. Nearly 9 percent of the population was affected in the initial research period compared to nearly 13 percent during the second part of the study.
  • Alcohol use disorders have almost doubled amongst the African American population.
  • There has been an increase of 84 percent of the female population struggling with alcohol use disorders.
  • It was also noted that alcohol use disorders increased more than double (106 percent) in individuals over the age of 65 and by nearly 82 percent in those between 45 and 65 years of age.

As can be seen, these statistics show the increase in alcohol use disorders. This is the complication of alcohol use and using alcohol in itself has spiked tremendously. High-risk drinking, a situation that is defined as consuming four or more drinks a day in women and five in men and including a day where this limit is exceeded at least once a week, has increased from nearly 10 percent in 2002/2003 to nearly 14 percent in 2012/2013.

What is Alcohol Use Disorder?

Alcohol use disorder is a condition that is associated with a pattern of alcohol use that involves:

  • Being preoccupied with alcohol.
  • Having problems controlling one’s frequency of drinking.
  • Continuing the use of alcohol even if it causes problems such as getting into trouble with the law.
  • Having to drink more alcohol in order to achieve the same effect.
  • Using alcohol to the point where the body becomes dependent on the substance and stopping it abruptly will lead to the user experiencing withdrawal symptoms.

Complications of alcohol use disorder may include:

  • Alcohol intoxication – the higher the alcohol level in the bloodstream, the more impaired one becomes and this can lead to issues such as mental changes and behavioral problems such as unstable moods, inappropriate behavior, slurred speech, poor coordination, and impaired judgment.
  • Alcohol withdrawal – when alcohol use is stopped or greatly reduced, the user can experience problems such as a rapid heartbeat, sweating, hand tremors, hallucinations, sleep-related problems, anxiety, agitation, and even seizures.

Pacific Bay Recovery

Pacific Bay Recovery is a top drug and alcohol rehabilitation center that specializes in helping patients with substance abuse issues such as alcohol use disorder.

The facility includes managing patients on an inpatient and/or outpatient basis depending on their needs and unique circumstances and offers the services of healthcare professionals such as psychologists, psychiatrists, and occupational therapists to name a few.

Substance Abuse and Inpatient Rehabilitation Services

Substance abuse is a difficult and challenging problem for affected individuals to manage and overcome. Factors such as the environment one lives in or is exposed to contribute to continued substance abuse. Increased stressors and being known as mental health conditions are also problems that can lead to alcohol and drug abuse and this may lead to further mental and physical complications.

Recognizing that one may have a problem with substance abuse can be quite difficult because most individuals who face this problem are either ignorant of the problem or are in denial of being affected. The following are symptoms that may help one identify if they have a problem with substance abuse:

  • Overcoming Substance AbuseThere’s a lack of control when using the abused substance.
  • Family members and friends express concern over the substance abuse.
  • Questioning whether the use of the substance is actually a problem or not.
  • Only the user knows the extent of their substance use.
  • The user is isolating themselves from friends and loved ones.
  • The performance of the user at school or at work is suffering.

Those individuals who continue with the behavior to abuse substances despite facing negative consequences such as poor health or getting into trouble with the law are considered to be addicted to the substance in question.

Inpatient Rehabilitation Services

 

Inpatient rehabilitation is a treatment program where addicted individuals spend between one and three months at a designated and licensed facility aimed at helping those with substance abuse problems.

The following services are offered at these inpatient facilities:

  • Medical detoxification, where patients are withdrawn from their respective abused substances in a safe environment and where there is access to a healthcare professional who helps them go through the withdrawal process.
  • Access to primary care doctors and psychiatrists to address any physical and mental health issues which may arise or already be present and need addressing. Many patients who abuse substances are either diagnosed with or have underlying mental health issues which, as mentioned, may trigger abusing the use of alcohol and drugs.
  • Psychologists are also available to discuss mental health conditions and any underlying and unresolved stressors at home or at work. Psychotherapy aims at helping the patient have a positive outlook on life and teaches them coping skills to better deal with stressors outside of the rehab facility.
  • Occupational therapists are involved with motivating affected individuals to help improve their drive and their mood by incorporating appropriate activities for patients to perform. Relaxation techniques are also taught by these allied healthcare workers.
  • Physical therapists may also be involved to help with any musculoskeletal conditions or just help reduce tension in affected individuals by working on tense areas of the body. Massage therapy, for example, is one of the clinically proven methods for helping with stress reduction.
  • The program is beneficial in monitoring the medication intake of patients which improves their compliance, such as where treatment is prescribed for certain individuals like methadone for heroin addicts.

The biggest benefit of an inpatient rehabilitation facility though is that the patient is taken out of their environment where exposure to the addictive substance is a problem. Here, they are able to focus on the important aspects such as overcoming their addiction with the right help in order to get back on track with their lives.

How To Identify Alcoholism

People across the western world are certainly fond of a drink. In fact, almost 27% of the American population over 18 binge drink every single month according to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Almost 70% of Americans had a drink in the past year and almost 56% in the past month. This will come as no surprise to many – and it’s no secret that lots of us need to cut down in one form or another. But the majority of Americans aren’t alcoholics. How can you differentiate between somebody that likes a drink and a problem drinker that potentially needs professional help? The simple steps below should help.

Identifying Alcoholism

Doctors across the world use a tool developed by the World Health Organisation called the AUDIT. It helps doctors identify people that might be at risk of alcohol abuse. Whilst it isn’t 100%, and scoring highly on it is not a diagnosis of alcoholism (you should always visit a licensed doctor for a diagnosis), it can give a good indicator of problem drinking and it’s a good tool to have in mind if you suspect you yourself or somebody you know may suffer from alcoholism.

The questionnaire includes 10 questions each with an answer scoring between 0 and 4. The maximum score is therefore 40, and any score over 20 indicates potential dependence. You can download the questionnaire for yourself at the following link but the questions include things such as:

  • How often during the last year have you found that you were not able to stop drinking once you had started?
  • How often during the last year have you failed to do what was normally expected from you because of your drinking?
  • How often during the last year have you needed an alcoholic drink in the morning to get yourself going after a heavy drinking session? (This is often known as an “eye opener” and it a big sign of alcoholism)
  • How often during the last year have you had a feeling of guilt or remorse after drinking?
  • Has a relative or friend, doctor or other health worker been concerned about your drinking or suggested that you cut down?

 

Getting Help For a Drinking Problem

 

If you or somebody you love scored highly on the World Health Organisations AUDIT score, it may indicate they have a dependence on alcohol. There are lots of treatment options available for those who do, and there are a number of specialist services available across the united states that can provide tailor-made plans to help an individual overcome their drinking problem. Their treatment options include:

  • Inpatient recovery facilities (where a patient will stay on site to break their habit)
  • Intensive outpatient treatment (where the patient come in for regular meetings to discuss and get help)
  • Pharmacotherapy – sometimes drugs may be prescribed to overcome withdrawal
  • CBT (cognitive behavioral therapy can be very helpful for people that have a dual diagnosis of alcoholism and a mental health condition).

Opioids Now a Bigger Killer Than Cancer: Here’s How We Fix That

Opioids Kill More than CancerA recent CNN report identified a devastating truth about the current opioid epidemic: opioids are now a bigger killer of Americans than cancer. In 2016 there were 42 000 overdoses of opioids (which include codeine, fentanyl, and heroin). Only 41 000 Americans die from breast cancer each year. The news that opioids are a bigger killer than breast cancer is no surprise for some, and much has been made about the national opioid crisis. In October the President Donald Trump announced from the White House that the opioid crisis was a “National Emergency” and needs to be dealt with immediately.

 

You might be forgiven for thinking that opioid addiction means heroin addiction. But increasingly that is not the case. Many people afflicted by this were actually prescribed these drugs for their chronic pain conditions by Doctors. When a clamp down on opioid prescriptions swept across America, many were left in the dark, addicted and alone. Talking to the Guardian, Cassie from Cleveland talked about the first time she used opioids for her back pain

 

“I felt like that’s how I wanted to feel for the rest of my life…I had energy, I was happy, nothing hurt, and it also took away those feelings of feeling, like, out of place. It just numbed me.”

 

Now 31, Cassie has overcome her addiction and says it was an uphill battle, but she is happy she can help people in a similar situation.

 

Prescription drug addiction affects thousands of Americans every year and isn’t just limited to opioids. The following drugs can be addictive and may require treatment:

 

  • Opiates – Also called narcotics and prescribed for severe or chronic pain.
  • Stimulants – Used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
  • Sedatives – Benzodiazepines used for sleep and to treat anxiety disorders.

 

The Solution: More Emphasis on Rehabilitation

 

It might seem like the landscape is dire, or that there is little hope for thousands of patients with prescription drug addiction from the way news outlets have been reporting the issue. But this isn’t true. With better support and a better understanding of the problem, we can make significant inroads into the problem.

 

A major issue has been the patients who were being prescribed drugs that have the “rug pulled out from under them” so to speak. These patients were taken off prescriptions and had no help to overcome their addiction. The CDC has made this a priority for Doctors, who are now being trained a lot more on how to wean their patients off the drugs.

 

There are also options for patients who do not have a prescription. Specialist rehabilitation services across the united states do fantastic work with both inpatient and outpatient services. They can take patients on an outpatient basis, where they prescribe a number of different drugs that can help wean addicts off the drugs. They also offer inpatient services, where the person stays at a residential facility with staff for a period of time. The clinician in charge of each patient will make a decision as to what treatment is appropriate for the patient.

 

With services like these, the opioid epidemic is sure to pass and patients will be free to live addiction-free lives.

 

Outpatient Rehab – Is it Right for Me?

For those whose lives still remain functional, outpatient rehab may be an option to consider. With this type of program, you see a counselor locally and work with therapy groups, attend AA/NA meetings, and complete assignments to help you with becoming drug- and/or alcohol-free. While you do have the freedom to live your life, random drug/alcohol tests are likely with this type of program, and you must be willing to submit to them, especially if it is court ordered outpatient care.

Addictive Medications and Minor AddictionsMinor Addictions

If you have trouble removing drugs and/or alcohol from your life, outpatient treatment may be right for you. This is especially the case if your life does not revolve solely around drinking and using drugs.  When you blow off friends, family, or general adult responsibilities to bar hop, consume an entire 12-pack of beer or bottle of alcohol, it’s time to get help. If you’d rather sit and completely lose your mind to get high instead of cleaning the house, grocery shopping, or spending time with your kids, it’s time to get help. This might be the right situation for you since you’re still able to function in daily life.

Remain in your Own Home

When attending outpatient rehab, you don’t have to deal with the stress of being in a strange place with conflicting personalities or those that are near death from their addictions. Being able to stay home with your family or in transitional housing while getting treatment has proven higher success rates. You have to take this program just as seriously as you would an inpatient center.

The transitional housing idea is to keep you in a dry household with others that are also in recovery. You still go to work, pay your bills, and have some freedom. There are curfews and some house rules to adhere to while seeing your counselor, participating in maintaining the home, and attending group sessions.

Live Normal Life without Drugs or Alcohol

In an outpatient program, you learn how to live life and make use of the extra time that you’d normally spend drinking or getting high. Some counselors suggest taking night college courses, painting, cooking, or taking up a hobby. It’s also an open invitation to get more involved with your spouse and children. Taking a more active role in your family is healing in itself and has plenty of benefits. You’re treating the addiction with your family, rather than being separated from them and feeling awkward returning home in a sober state.

Outpatient programs don’t work for everyone. This is the case with addicts where the only method of detection is by a blood sample or spinal tap. These expensive procedures have to be paid for by the patient and most cannot afford them. For those that recognize their problem and cannot afford inpatient care, this is a good place to start. It can be considered as temporary treatment while you look for financial aid or “scholarship” funds to get clean and live a healthy, substance-free lifestyle again.

Can You Get Alcohol Withdrawal Treatment At Home?

alcohol abuse treatmentA recent article on Foxnews.com explored just how dangerous attempting to deal with alcohol withdrawal at home without treatment can be. Alcohol addiction is a difficult illness to overcome, especially in people who can’t afford expensive long-term residential programmes. However, going cold turkey without the proper medication can be deadly. Luckily there are alternatives but currently, there is a lack of understanding about the options for alcohol withdrawal treatment at home.

Alcohol Withdrawal

If you don’t remember your biology classes from high school take a minute to remind yourself about homeostasis. Homeostasis explains how the body keeps itself in sync. Homeostasis explains why you are able to maintain a body temperature of 37 degrees Celsius (by sweating if you become too hot or shivering if you are too cold). The same principle applies to alcohol. When you consistently consume alcohol, your brain adapts to its new normal. The neurons (the signaling cells in the brain) adapt and get used to the alcohol. Of course, the alcohol is having detrimental effects on the body – particularly the liver – whilst a person drinks. When you take the alcohol away you put the body out of sync. The brain is no longer in homeostasis. Without the depressant effect of the alcohol, the brain goes into overdrive causing a number of distressing symptoms:

  • Tremors – your hands may shake as the brain wrestles to control the body
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Headache
  • Sweating
  • Irritability
  • Hallucinations – This occurs in the brain cannot process what is a genuine stimuli (aka what the brain is seeing) and what is part of the imagination. This can be particularly distressing.
  • Death

Alcohol Withdrawal medication

A much safer way to detox from alcohol is with a certified recovery practice. This can either be as an inpatient, but can also be managed at home. You may have heard of many of the alcohol withdrawal medications which include:

  • Benzodiazepines: these drugs have been used for years to treat symptoms of alcohol withdrawal. They work by decreasing brain activity (which you need during the withdrawal period). They have a sedative effect, relaxing the patient and putting them to sleep.
  • Anticonvulsants: You might have heard of these drugs being used for epilepsy. That’s because they were originally designed to treat epilepsy. However, addicts undergoing withdrawal can often have seizures (much like an epileptic would) and these drugs can help prevent that.
  • Vitamins: In very severe instances, vitamin deficiencies in alcoholics can lead to dementia. As such vitamins are needed to supplement addicts who are usually extremely low in vitamins.

As we have seen – alcohol withdrawal is dangerous but there are options for addicts looking for alcohol withdrawal treatment at home. A number of alcohol withdrawal medications are available to avoid some of the distressing and occasionally deadly side effects of withdrawal. If you do try to detox at home, make sure you seek help from an experienced recovery clinic that can prescribe withdrawal medications and guide you through the process with experienced practitioners.

Holistic Rehab – It Isn’t just Crazy Talk

What is Holistic RehabA holistic approach to rehabilitation (rehab) for addictions might seem crazy, but the truth is, it works. These programs are based upon the premise that natural elements remove negative energies and toxins from the body to reduce the “need” for drugs and/or alcohol. Consider it as being a realist’s way of healing. Look into these programs and view the success rates–you may be shocked.

Natural Cleansing Remedies

Connecting with nature and natural elements help to detoxify the body naturally, removing toxins that aid in your dependency on drugs and/or alcohol. What this does is create natural endorphins, which are what creates happiness and energy.  When your body rids itself of negative feelings from positive reinforcements, such as a happy life, a tranquil environment, and a great support group, you can be on your way to embracing a natural lifestyle. This holistic approach may seem absolutely nuts to some, but it isn’t harsh on the body at all. It’s actually quite refreshing.

Aromatherapy for Trigger Reduction

Triggers and temptation cause a general unsettled feeling in the body. Aromatherapy counteracts it. There are different scents that every person finds relaxing. It is important to work with your counselor to find the perfect combination for your unique situation. For instance, someone who becomes angry when their drug of choice is not available may enjoy warm scents such as cinnamon, chocolate, or fresh baked goods. Those that get anxious when they need a fix typically enjoy eucalyptus or fruit scents.

What this type of therapy does is teach you how to take those feelings of anger, depression, and anxiety in combination with a relaxing scent and allow the negative energy to leave the body. The counselor will instruct you to use these scents, and fresh air to calm these unwanted feelings.

Creating Positives Out of Negatives

For every negative in life, there are several positives that will follow. It is important to learn how to take bad feelings, cravings, and triggers and turn them into something constructive. This can mean building something, painting, a new hobby or even going for an evening walk. It’s very cleansing to concentrate these feelings into something constructive to create feelings of accomplishment and happiness. Yoga is peaceful and helps to relax both the mind and body at the same time. Other ideas to consider are learning to cook, taking classes to learn a new trade, joining a walking club, or even just taking walks in nature on your own.

Holistic approaches aren’t for the birds. The body reacts to natural stimulation in a positive manner. Negative energy by allowing life’s stresses and tragedies to take over is what often leads society to dangerous addictions. Those with serious addictions may take longer to benefit from this approach and it may be very hard on the body in the beginning. Once you go through the program and see just how fresh and happy you feel, you’ll see that the tough road was all worth it and you’ll be more motivated to maintain the lifestyle.

The Stages of Relapse

Relapse is associated with many feelings, attitudes, and behaviors. There are 10 stages involved with relapse that has been identified by experts.

Stage1: Unhealthy Emotions

When you stop using drugs and develop a recovery plan to stay clean, you initially do fine. However, at some point, you may come upon a problem and not be able to adequately cope emotionally. These unhealthy emotions are often called “stinking thinking” because you feel down and out but do not understand why.

 

RelapseStage 2:  Denial

Instead of recognizing that you are stressed and emotionally unable to cope with these feelings, you use denial to convince yourself everything will be alright. However, this mechanism is similar to what you use when you are dealing with addiction and confronted with uncomfortable feelings. Denial of emotional stress often leaves the recovering addict feeling overwhelmed. If you use recovery tools, you will know that sharing these feelings help you get over these emotions.

The worst thing a recovering addict can do in the denial stage is isolated him- or herself from support persons. You may overreact and focus on internal issues, causing you to relapse quicker. Don’t distance yourself from your support network during the denial stage. Learn how to recognize it and move forward. During recovery, you may feel like you are on a roller coaster of your emotions. This is the stage of relapse where you often feel anxious and have much sleeplessness and sadness. These ups and downs are part of the denial stage of relapse.

 

Stage 3:  Compulsive Behaviors

In the downward progression of drug use, a recovering addict first tries to cope with emotional stresses by engaging in certain compulsive behaviors rather than using appropriate recovery tools. During this stage of relapse, you will find your thinking going back to the old, insane ways associated with drug and/or alcohol use. You know you don’t want to get back on drugs again, but you are also not using the techniques to cope that you learned in rehab.

Emotional relapse is associated with compulsive behaviors. These are things we do to attempt to repair ourselves, slowly abandoning the recovery program and returning to drug use. During this stage of the relapse process, you make irrational choices, use poor judgment, and become argumentative and defensive. Signs of emotional relapse include sleeping more, ignoring personal hygiene, and having distorted thinking.

 

Stage 4:  Triggers

Triggers are things, places, and situations that remind you or prompt you to use drugs or drink alcohol. In a solid recovery program, you do not use the right techniques to avoid and ignore triggers. During this stage, you need to avoid places that remind you of your using days. Triggers snap you and set you off. During this stage, you should attend a meeting, contact a sponsor, or turn to a higher power to remove the obsession for using drugs or drinking.

 

Stage 5:  Interior Chaos

When a person is triggered to use drugs, their stress level goes up and erratic emotions control thinking. This leads to interior chaos, which is part of mental relapse. During this stage, thinking patterns are more distorted and insane, with the obsession to use drugs becoming stronger. The reality of your condition is obscured by fantasies of the good old days of drug use.

During stage 5, you need to remind yourself of why you wanted to get clean in the first place. You need to go back and remember how the disease rendered both your body and mind abnormal. Also, you need to stay focused on the program in hopes of maintaining recovery. It is crucial that you remember that it is not external issues that lead to drug use, but it’s your inability to cope with emotions and thoughts that drive you toward drugs.

 

Stage 6:  Exterior Turmoil

If you remain in a state of mental relapse, you may at some point realize that your frame of mind is not right. You know that you are slipping out of recovery and having feelings of shame, fear, or even pride. Eventually, your addictive thinking ways cause problems with your outside world. This is when you have fights with family members, get into arguments with co-workers, and feel bitter.

 

Stage 7: Loss of Control

If you try handling your problems without help, they may overwhelm you until you feel fed up. You may feel that you are getting out of control again. Life may become troublesome, and you are at crises. Once you recognize that you are out of control, you may have a chance at staying clean. This is a crucial point during relapse to identify the problems and refrain from drug use.

 

Stage 8:  Addictive Thinking

At this stage of your relapse, you use all your addict defense mechanisms. The disease convinces you that recovery is not working, and that you should just do what you want. You may feel miserable and fail to understand what is really going on. Deluded feelings convince you that recovery is too hard and not enjoyable. The disease makes you avoid support persons, skip meetings, and think about using more and more. To avoid responsibilities, you think about leaving your spouse, quitting your job, and using drugs.

 

Stage 9: High-Risk Situations

By this stage, your mental relapse is full-blown. Your emotions are in turmoil and your thinking is distorted. You believe it is alright to go back to visiting places where drugs are, and you get to be around the drug scene. You justify your behavior and put yourself in real high-risk situations.

 

Stage 10:  Relapse

When you actually relapse, you revert back to your old ways of thinking, feeling, and behaving. You find yourself abandoning your recovery skills and using drugs and/or alcohol again. The way you see it, you can use or commit suicide. Relapse is not a failure, however. Rather, this is just a minor setback. At this point, you need to go back into inpatient treatment, where you can work through your problems and get clean again.