Call today to schedule your free and confidential consultation.

Call today to schedule your free and confidential consultation.


Addiction Rehab Center

Alcoholism in Females

Historically, alcoholism has been a health issue that is more prevalent in men as compared to women. Men have always consumed more alcohol in previous generations. But this appears to be changing of late. Biologically speaking, women are more prone to alcoholism compared to men based on their body compositions – female drinkers tend to experience adverse effects and develop alcohol-related addictions more quickly than their male counterparts.

The changing social norms are playing a role in this development. It is becoming more acceptable for women of all ages to drink. This has reached alarming proportions, to the point that the health epidemic of women and alcoholism that is impacting millions of American families.

At least one statistic here is good news – it has been found that women are also more likely to seek treatment for alcoholism than men. There are several factors for that. It is more socially acceptable for women to be open and honest with their feelings than it is for men, which facilitates the process of getting help and being treated. Women also tend to be more responsible about alcoholism given its obvious impact on pregnancy. They are very careful about protecting their family and cite that as their primary reason for seeking treatment.

Ethnic background plays a role in how likely it is for someone to develop alcoholism

Binge drinking for women is defined as 4 or more drinks in less than a 2-hour period. This activity is becoming increasingly common. It was reported in a recent study that around 40 percent of White women, over 10 percent of Hispanic women, and less than 10 percent of black women were found to binge drink. Women who binge drink are at an increased risk of alcohol abuse and alcoholism, liver damage, dehydration, more likely to be subjected to sexual assault, more prone to reckless and risky behavior, and most critically, have a higher likelihood of suffering from alcohol poisoning, leading to death. Not all binge drinking females are alcoholics, but those who binge drink are more likely to become so, especially if it continues for an extended period of time. Ethnic background plays a role in how likely it is for someone to develop alcoholism. A study has shown that 71 percent of white women become heavy drinkers at some point in their lives, along with 47 percent of black women, 47 percent of Hispanic women, and 37 percent of Asian women.

Women are also more likely to suffer from a number of unique alcohol-related health risks that do not impact their male counterparts. The most critical among them is breast cancer. It has been found that women who consume large amounts of alcohol are at an increased risk of breast cancer (two drinks per day increase the risk by 1%, 6 or more drinks increases the risk by 4%). Fetal Alcohol Syndrome is a well-known major alcohol-induced complication of pregnancy (occurring at the rate of 1 in 10 pregnant women drink alcohol and 1 in 50 pregnant women binge drink). Other health risks, while not exclusive to women, include alcoholic hepatitis, heart disease, brain damage, mental health issues, fatty liver, and various cancers.

What Happens When An Addict Fails Treatment Recovery?

Ideally, all addiction patients who go through the recovery process will recover from their disease and never relapse. Unfortunately, the world is not perfect, and many times, patients relapse. After a relapse, many addiction patients may find it very difficult to return to the recovery process. However, it is important to remember than many people experience relapse, and it is never too late, nor is a patient ever too far gone to begin the recovery process again.

One of the most challenging things for a patient to do is face their family and mend broken relationships. Restoring broken relationships with the family is an important step in ensuring the addict has a strong support system to help with rehabilitation. Often, it is helpful for the addict and family to have an unbiased person facilitating the initial conversations. Many families do not fully understand addiction, and in some cases, may actually be enabling the addict in their disease.

Another step to successful recovery includes creating healthy boundaries within the family. This can be everything from financial boundaries, boundaries in what is discussed about treatment and the addict’s disease, and understanding sensitive topics. Every family is different, so these boundaries may differ. However, all addicts need boundaries to help them in their recovery. If things go back to exactly the way they were, they may run the risk of relapse again. This is also why it is also important for addicts to seek out support groups aside from their families who may better understand their situation such as Alcoholics Anonymous or similar groups.

It is important for addicts who have failed treatment to remember that as long as they are willing to try again, it is a misstep, not a failure. Many people in the world have relapsed multiple times. The beauty of addiction treatment programs is they always offer a place for addicts to start when they are ready to deal with their disease.

Typically, people who follow the rehabilitation program steps will have success in remaining sober. However, relapse usually occurs when one or more of the steps is not followed. If treatment recovery fails, the addict, the family, and the rehabilitation center need to figure out where the breakdown was, so relapse does not occur again. In some cases, it may be that the addict was skipping appoints, or reverted to an old friend group, and in other cases, it may be that the addict’s family was enabling them.

There is a multitude of reasons why treatment recover fails. But, the important thing to remember is there is always time to start again. When an addict and their family are committed to fighting addiction, there is hope. Many rehabilitation centers encompass treatment for the patient, along with education for the family. Addiction is a terrifying disease and can do a lot of harm to a person’s life. It may take several tries before successful treatment occurs. The most important thing is to remember never to give up hope. There is always help right around the corner.

Keys to Successful Drug Addiction Recovery

Drug addiction recovery will look different for each person because all people are unique. Some people may need a stronger emphasis on certain parts of the recovery, and some people may struggle more with other parts. While drug addiction recovery is unique for each person, there are a few key factors that can benefit all people undergoing drug addiction recovery.

First off, typically the longer a treatment program is, the more successful it will be. This especially applies to those addicts who are deep in their addiction. Addiction occurs because neuro pathways in the brain have changed to make the addict need a drug. Every time the addict uses his or her substance of choice, those pathways are reinforced and become even harder to change. Therefore, a person who has been suffering from addiction for many years may benefit from a more extended treatment program than someone who is a new user. Some research has found that programs over 90 days offer the best chance for success.

It is also important for the person undergoing recovery treatment to have a strong network of people who understand their struggle. While healthy family and friend relationships are key to help an addict’s recovery last, it is equally as important for an addict to feel they have a network of people who understand what they have been through. Treatment programs that encompass a full lifestyle change versus solely focusing on no longer using typically have the best results.

While outside influences and support groups are important, at the end of the day, the addict is the most important part of drug addiction recovery. Patients need to be willing to put themselves first, to show up to all meetings, get a sponsor, go to family and individual therapy, re-learn how to manage money and be a productive member of society, and ultimately forgive themselves. Many patients end up relapsing because the guilt and shame they feel are just too much to bear. A key part of drug addiction recovery success is rooted in forgiveness. Forgiveness allows the addict to put themselves first and take the necessary steps to maintain their recovery and avoiding relapse.

There is no shortcut to a successful drug recovery. Patients and families must be willing to put in the work, both in the short term and the long term, to ensure the person suffering from addiction can stay sober. The most important thing is for an addict to undergo recovery for themselves. They need to remember it is ok to prioritize their recovery process, whether that means meetings every day, or therapy, or getting a whole new group of friends. Following the recovery process without taking any shortcuts is key to remaining sober.

Drug addiction recovery is not a one size fits all. Some people may stay in a treatment program for a few months, while others may remain for a year. Each person’s circumstance and needs are different. It is key to find a recovery program that focuses on creating a customized treatment plan. For this reason, it is also important for addicts not to compare themselves to others and to never lose hope. While recovery will not be the same for everyone, having a strong support system, sticking to the program, and forgiving oneself are all necessary keys for an addict to have a successful recovery.

What is a Functioning Addict?

Most people hear the term “addict” and immediately picture someone who is down and out. They imagine someone so addicted to their substance of choice that they may have lost their home and be living on the streets. Or someone involved in a life of crime, and maybe they have even been in and out of prison. While this is the reality for many addicts, there is another kind of addict called a “functioning addict.”

The term “functioning addict” is a bit of a misnomer. While yes, functioning addicts are typically able to maintain their jobs or losing all their money, they are not fully functioning people. The typical day of a functioning addict may start with a drink in the morning, and barely making it through the workday until they have a few more drinks when they get home. Functioning addicts are typically absent from their role in the family. They are removed from social groups and tend to keep to themselves.

While this may not cause physical harm, it can adversely affect the family unit and friendships.
Friends and family of an addict need to understand that addiction is a disease, even when it is in the form of a functioning addict. Often, people may look at a functioning addict and assume they simply do not want to get help or do not care to remain involved in their family and friend groups. However, functioning addicts are suffering from a disease that they may not be able to heal from on their own.

There are actual physical brain changes that occur in the brain of a functioning addict. Typically drugs and alcohol cause a dopamine release in the brain. After this pattern is repeated multiple times, as is the case with an addict, the brain stores the memory that using a specific substance will make the whole body feel better, even though the substance is harmful. The dopamine release is so powerful, it makes it very difficult for the addict to find happiness or joy from anything other than the substance to which they are addicted. The more a person uses a substance to feel better, the stronger the neuro connections in the brain become that drive the person to desire the substance.

One of the important parts of addiction treatment is building new neuropathways the re-teach the brain how to find pleasure in something other than the addict’s substance of choice. It is also important that addicts learn to avoid triggers, and when they do encounter triggers, learn healthier ways of dealing with them. Functioning addicts may be able to participate in most day to day activities. However, their lives are still negatively affected by substances. Many functioning addicts can find outpatient treatment, which can help them regain control of their lives. Addiction is a challenging disease to heal from without help. Fortunately, there are many resources available to those living with this disease.

Drug Abuse in the United States

Drug abuse is a major problem in the United States. It can come in the form of alcohol, tobacco, illicit drugs, or prescription drugs. While some of these substances are legal, when people begin using any kind of substance in an effort to get high, it becomes drug abuse. Drug abuse is a problem that affects a wide range of people, from teenagers to adults, students to professionals, athletes, you name it. Drug abuse can occur for a wide variety of reasons. Therefore, those suffering from drug addiction require a personalized treatment plan in order to begin the process of recovery.

Alcohol is one of the most common drugs. Many people drink alcohol, and in moderation, it can be ok. However, 6.5% of the population in the U.S. admits to heavy drinking. Heavy drinking can lead to problems such as liver and pancreas disease. Women who abuse alcohol while pregnant can event affect their child. Many people discount signs of alcohol abuse because alcohol is “legal.” However, it is a very widely abused substance and should be taken seriously,

Hallucinogens such as PCP and LSD are commonly used among drug abusers
Marijuana is another widely abused substance and is very popular among the teenage demographic. While it may not be as fatal as other drugs, it can still negative effects on the user. Cocaine is another abused drug. People who use cocaine typically do so for its stimulant effects. It keeps people awake for long period s of time and can give the user euphoric effects. While the effects typically only last half an hour, the drug can quickly alter the person’s body putting them at a much higher risk of stroke. Hallucinogens such as PCP and LSD are commonly used among drug abusers. While it’s much harder to overdose from these drugs, many people who utilize them are at risk of secondary injuries from distorted perception such as falling.

Heroin is possibly the most addictive drug in the world. Unfortunately, in recent years, heroin use in the U.S. has surged due to the crackdown on prescription medications. Heroin is extremely addictive because it changes brain function. With regular use, those who use heroin quickly develop a tolerance and find themselves unable to function without more and more heroin in their systems. Another reason for heroin is so addictive is due to the painful detox. Even with one use, people may start feeling withdrawal symptoms after the drug has worn off. People who inject heroin will find themselves at a higher risk of blood-borne infections due to dirty needles. They are also at risk for Hepatitis C, HIV, kidney disease, abscesses, and even death.

There is a multitude of drugs people choose to abuse for various reasons. Sometimes it is because they were legally prescribed, sometimes it is because they were just curious to try a drug. However, regardless of the user’s drug of choice, treatment, and a strong support system is always important in the road to recovery. Much of the recovery includes detox, therapy, and coping mechanisms to help the drug abuser lead a healthier and drug-free lifestyle.

Alcohol Abuse Program

Alcohol abuse is a disease that affects many people throughout the world today. It is a trying situation, not just for the person affected, but also for all the people who care about him or her. Many people who are suffering from alcohol abuse need help in their recovery. The Pacific Bay Recovery Alcohol Abuse Treatment Program in San Diego utilizes a multifaceted approach to helping those afflicted with the disease heal. Each person is unique and requires an individualized approach in order to make treatment effective. While alcohol abuse can make a person or family feel hopeless, it is important to remember there are plenty of treatment options available.

Some people are more susceptible to alcohol abuse due to their genetic makeup. When these people experience stressors, they may have a higher likelihood of turning to alcohol as their coping mechanism. Pacific Bay Recovery aims to not only treat active alcohol abuse, but they also aim to teach patients skills to prevent relapse in the future. This includes everything from learning healthier coping mechanisms to adjusting social influences.

Pacific Bay Recovery takes a holistic approach to alcohol abuse recovery

According to the National Institutes of Health, 15% of Americans have an issue with controlling their alcohol consumption. While alcohol is not a problem when used in moderation, when it gets to the point of taking over a person’s life, there may be a need for outside help. Pacific Bay Recovery’s Inpatient Treatment Center exists to help those suffering from alcohol abuse take back control of their lives.

One of the most difficult parts of alcohol abuse treatment is going through the withdrawal period. This is the reason Pacific Bay Recovery believes inpatient treatment is necessary. By providing inpatient treatment, the patient is able to be managed around the clock during the withdrawal period, and alcohol withdrawal symptoms are less likely to lead to a relapse. Symptoms typically show up 5-10 hours after the last drink and can last up to three days. Once past the withdrawal symptoms, it becomes much easier for the patient to focus on other factors affecting his or her alcohol abuse.

Alcohol abuse is typically the manifestation of a variety of underlying conditions such as, an inability to manage stress, genetic makeup, anxiety and depression, and an overall unhealthy lifestyle. As a result, Pacific Bay Recovery provides patients with mental health addiction counselors to help the patient make overall lifestyle changes in hopes of creating sustained abstinence from alcohol. This can range from creating a healthier sleeping, eating, and exercising schedule to reevaluating personal friendships and relationships that may be unhealthy.

Pacific Bay Recovery provides patients with a full team of advocates composed of a case manager, a doctor, and various mental health specialists in order to create and execute a treatment plan. Patients are expected to complete various chores to help with skills training and rehabilitation. Depending on the patient’s particular needs, he or she may be prescribed various medications to help reduce the desire to drink.

Pacific Bay Recovery takes a holistic approach to alcohol abuse recovery. Every patient is unique, and as a result, an individualized approach must be taken with each patient. The inpatient treatment center allows for a specialized team to create this individualized approach for each patient. Those individuals who are suffering from alcohol abuse and are looking for help should contact Pacific Bay Recovery at (858) 263-9700.

Psilocybin Abuse

Psilocybin is a psychoactive substance contained in several species of mushrooms, which are consumed recreationally. Psilocybin/mushrooms are categorized as psychedelic drugs (or hallucinogens) and are considered to be a Schedule I controlled substance without any indications for medical use by the United States Drug Enforcement Administration 2. However, there is some evidence to suggest that it may have some therapeutic utility for some conditions, such as depression. Approximately, 1.2 million people over the age of 12 have been reported to be users of hallucinogens, and young people with a co-occurring major depressive disorder have been found to be more likely to use hallucinogenic drugs than those without that diagnosis.

These mushrooms containing psilocybin are typically ingested or drank as a brewed beverage. They are hallucinogenic and people consume it to experience a “good trip”, which are vivid perceptual effects (visual and auditory hallucinations) and changes in perception of time. Sometimes, user experience a “bad trip”, which comprise negative experiences while under the influence, and can have lasting effects on the user. Other symptoms include detachment from reality or self, feeling of spiritual experiences, intense emotions, increased respiration, temperature, and blood pressure, heart palpitations, tremors, loss of appetite, dry mouth, sleep disturbances, nausea, blurred vision, dilated pupils, loss of coordination, paranoia, and in extreme cases, psychosis. These users are prone to injury or death as a result of poor judgment while under the influence of psilocybin. Furthermore, they are also at increased risk of poisoning and potential death from accidentally ingesting a misidentified, poisonous mushroom.

These mushrooms containing psilocybin are typically ingested or drank as a brewed beverage

About 4.2% of the users experience what is known as the hallucinogen persisting perception disorder, which includes flashbacks or re-experiencing of psilocybin intoxication despite having abstained from magic mushroom use for an extended period of time.

Persistent use of psilocybin can indeed result in addiction. The signs of psilocybin addiction include craving for mushrooms and spending a lot of time and effort seeking them and using them despite failure to fulfill personal obligations, or having a concern for social/interpersonal problems or health issues. These abusers also repeatedly fail to cut down or quit using mushrooms.

Psilocybin/mushroom treatment becomes necessary for someone who abuses it to the point that they become out of touch with reality. The treatment plan is targeted at weaning them from psilocybin/mushroom dependency. The good news is that psilocybin is not that addictive, so there is no major chemical/pharmacologic dependence; however, the psychological dependence is quite strong. Things get complicated when there is polysubstance abuse. This is not uncommon in these users, as they tend to use other agents as well, such as alcohol, benzodiazepines, stimulants or opioids. Such users would always require a rigorous detox program and rehabilitation in order to have a full recovery. There are various programs especially designed to address not only these addiction issues but also the underlying psychological issues that predispose them to addiction in the first place.

Hashish addiction

Hashish is a plant derivative substance, extracted from the trichomes, flowers, and fragments of leaves and stems of the cannabis plant. It contains tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is the same active ingredients found in marijuana, but at a much higher concentration (up to 15% in hashish as compared to 5% in marijuana). Hash oil is another substance produced by solvent extraction of hashish/marijuana and ends up having even a higher dose of THC.

Based on the way it is prepared, it comes in various forms and preparations. Hash oil comes as a golden syrupy-like substance. Hash is typically consumed by smoking or ingestion, but the effects are much faster and stronger when smoked due to faster entry into the bloodstream through the lungs. How does hashish work? The active substance of hashish, THC acts by binding to cannabinoid receptors in the neurons, which results in physical, emotional, and cognitive effects.

The active substance of hashish, THC acts by binding to cannabinoid receptors in the neurons, which results in physical, emotional, and cognitive effects
While many studies have shown that there are medicinal effects of cannabis products, particularly a substance known as cannabidiol, it should be noted that the United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) still considers cannabis a Schedule I controlled substance, meaning that it is considered to have no medicinal use and a high potential for abuse.

So what does hash abuse look like? Hashish is typically smoked in pipes or bongs. Some users add hashish to food or brew it in a tea, and other casual ways. However, given the potent concentration of THC present in hashish, it has a higher potential for addiction and more serious side effects as compared to marijuana. The typical signs and symptoms of hash addiction include euphoria, increased relaxation, hunger, sore throat, panic, paranoia, anxiety, tachycardia, hypertension, impaired coordination, lack of motivation, impaired concentration, and hallucinations.

Long-term effects of hash abuse include immunosuppression, respiratory issues from chronic lung damage, sexual dysfunction in males, cardiovascular issues, mental issues, etc. As expected, hashish users face significant social issues as well, such as job loss, financial issues, legal issues, strained relationships with spouses, children, and other loved ones, just to name a few.

The use of hashish among teens is disproportionately high. There are several reasons for that – most of them having to do that mainstream acceptance and legalization (in some states) of marijuana, and coupling hashish with it as a comparable alternative, which of course, it isn’t. There is a tendency is downplay the potential for abuse, physical dependence, and other harmful effects of hashish. The teens are even more susceptible to its deleterious effects because of their greater propensity for the development of a substance use disorder. They are also more susceptible to peer pressure and having an underlying ADHD or conduct disorder which increases their predilection for hashish addiction, further leading to polysubstance abuse.

Health awareness and education play an important role in helping teenagers understand the hazards of hashish use. Preventing hashish addiction can also prevent falling prey to other even more serious drugs such as heroin and cocaine.

The Addiction of Sniffing Glue

Sniffing glue is a dangerous addiction. Glue is easily available and provides a degree of euphoria (feeling high) that gets people, especially younger individuals (teenagers) hooked. Solvent glue is categorized as an Inhalant, among others including aerosol sprays, cleaners, etc. There are various forms of solvent glues available, such as model glue and rubber cement.

While it might appear to be a casual activity, it can actually be life-threatening. But even if the result isn’t fatal, it can still lead to brain damage and serious lung injury. The degree of bodily harm this addictive behavior inflicts depends on the type of glue used and the frequency and amount of it inhaled. Some of the symptoms that can help identify someone who is sniffing glue include the chemical odor on clothes and breath, rash around the mouth, headaches, dizziness, nausea and vomiting, mood swings and belligerence, decline in thinking skills, concentration, and decision-making ability, loss of interest in normal activities, lack of interest in personal relationships, numbness and tingling in hands and feet, loss of coordination, fatigue, hearing loss, apathy, impaired judgment, and loss of consciousness.

Inhalants have been known to cause various degrees of brain damage
Some of the most significant organ damage that can result from sniffing glue include:

Lung injury: Sniffing glue can lead to acute respiratory failure, which is a potentially fatal condition. It occurs by direct damage to lung tissue by the chemicals in the glue, which then limits the necessary amount of oxygen being absorbed into the blood. If other substances are being used as well, they can further promote lung damage in these users, and lead to irreversible chronic respiratory failure.

Brain damage: Inhalants have been known to cause various degrees of brain damage. The most widely implicated chemicals are toluene and naphthalene, which can damage the myelin sheath, and cause potentially severe and irreversible damage to brain function.

Cardiac injury: Sniffing inhalants can also cause damage to the heart, specifically its electric circuitry. This can lead to an irregular heartbeat, also known as arrhythmia, and can potentially lead to heart failure. There is a condition known as sudden sniffing death syndrome (SSDS), which may occur even after a single use of an inhalant.

In addition to the above, inhalant use can also cause liver and renal damage.

The treatment for inhalant use is emergent. If the user is found to be unconscious, call 911 immediately and remove them from the toxic environment they were found in. The focus of the emergent treatment is to get the person to be stable, followed by rehab therapy. Rehab therapy is focused on identifying factors that led to the use of inhalants, and help address any underlying causes, such as mental health disorders. While the acute rehab treatment is inpatient, the patient is switched to an outpatient setting once stable enough. It should be followed by relapse prevention programs and support groups to help the recovered patient stay away from the conditions that lead to inhalant use through continued support.

Celebrity Addicts

Are celebrities more prone to addictions than the rest of us mortal human beings who must survive everyday stressors like paying our bills and getting that stain out of the carpet? This is a fair question. And we don’t have an exact answer for you.

But one author-therapist spoke up on the topic, stating clearly that celebrity life includes enormous pressures that most people never experience. Yes, we mortals have severe stress points in our lives. And, yes, the frequent lists on occupations and addictions often names doctors, miners, policemen as very vulnerable to alcoholism and drug abuse. Other lists name forest management, farming, fishermen and sales jobs as high on the list of vulnerable occupations. Seldom do you see celebrities on these lists.

But think of the pressure to be a movie actor, especially one who is the star of the show. If the movie bombs, seldom do the newspapers announce the writer’s career is imperiled. But they frequently write, “if the actor doesn’t find a moneymaker soon to put on his or her resume, their career is cooked.”

 

actors are doubly vulnerable simply because they are sensitive, creative and put their creativity out there for the entire world to see

What’s the problem here? Stress is in the eye of the beholder to a certain degree. If you like chaos, then chaos is not so stressful for you. And, where does this leave doctors? If they make a mistake, the results could be life-changing – devastating. Tell me an actor has more stress than that?

Los Angeles-based Dr. Jenn Mann, an author of a book on relationships, says that actors are doubly vulnerable simply because they are sensitive, creative and put their creativity out there for the entire world to see. In addition, companies invest millions, often hundreds of millions of dollars, in that actor or actress, which puts a lot of heavy expectations on the thespian’s shoulders.

Big Time Pressure

“You take that sort of personality that is already vulnerable to these issues and then you put them in a situation where there is enormous pressure to perform,” Hollywood Life quoted Dr. Mann as saying. “That is unbelievable pressure that very few people can even comprehend in the regular world, because a lot of people go, ‘oh, you’re just getting paid so much money, who cares?” But this is also putting yourself out there and your work and your future,” she said.

What about Money?

Ah, remember money? That’s supposed to be the root of all evil and sometimes it certainly is. What do you do if you’re having an anxiety attack because you have to perform at work the next day – as a doctor, an actor or a businessperson? You might have a drink to calm your nerves. This can become a habit with anyone who lets the alcohol begin to take control. There may be genetic factors involved. You don’t need too much of a push before alcoholism can be diagnosed.

The actor that sparked the interview in Hollywood Life was unknown to me and his name is irrelevant, but he was one of the lead actors to a mega-huge television show. The interesting points of his case included his descriptions in previous interviews about how the months when his character was getting tons and tons of media attention were his worse moments on the show.

Wait — don’t actors live for that kind of attention? Well, yes and no. It’s a double-edged sword. The attention means you will be eligible for a part in another high paying show. But it also means your every move is subjected to public scrutiny, both on the screen and off.

Opportunity

Meanwhile, all that money not only represents pressure but an opportunity. Everyone wants to be your best pal, be part of your life, buy you a drink or have you buy them one … money, money, money. When your paycheck has six zeroes on it, temptations are affordable. Do you want to take the edge off? Six zeroes can certainly make that happen.

In fact, as Dr. Mann said, when you reach “a certain level of stardom,” you suddenly become surrounded by handlers, people who want your attention, your signature, your time, your endorsement. Life begins to swirl and drugs and alcohol can certainly make that swirling go away for a while before the swirling becomes spiraling out of control.

Make A Call

Are you or someone you love suffering from addiction issues? If so, professional help is a phone call away. Call Pacific Bay Recovery in San Diego at 858-263-9700. Call soon and break the cycle.