Call today to schedule your free and confidential consultation.

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Addiction Rehab Center

Opioid Alternatives for Chronic Pain Relief

As we all know, we are in an opioid epidemic in this country. But the good news is that the numbers are beginning to go down. Having said that, the job is still not done. The main reason we still high opioid use (and eventually abuse) is that we still have a very high prevalence of chronic pain (almost 1 in 10). And opioids are still being overprescribed. Hence, there is a pressing need to use opioid alternatives for chronic pain relief.

Not only that opioids have a very high addiction potential  (15-fold greater risk for those who have been taking opioids for three or more months), but also they are not very effective in the management of chronic pain. There are a number of alternative strategies that have been found to be effective against chronic pain, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, acupuncture, medical massage, physical therapy, etc.

Chronic pain is defined as a pain condition that lasts for more than six months. Studies have shown that chronic pain involves the same areas of the brain as the emotional disturbance. Emotional pain is treated with alternative methods, so it is worth exploring if chronic pain can be effectively managed that way as well.
Opioid use has yet to be seen whether these efforts made any difference in preventing addiction
Many healthcare providers have made initiatives to minimize the chance of opioid addiction. Pain clinics assess people for risk of addiction, have them sign a medication contract, educate and counsel them on the risks of addiction and other side effects, perform urine drug testing, undertake pill counts, etc. But it has yet to be seen whether these efforts made any difference in preventing addiction.

The opioid alternatives that are being used for chronic pain management include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), antidepressants and antiseizure medications. Nonpharmacologic options include cognitive behavioral therapy, exercise therapy, physical therapy, etc. There are also some interventional approaches such as nerve blocks, neuromodulation, etc. These methods have been found to be effective in chronic pain management.

There is now one-stop-shop type of pain clinics where the patient can see a physician, a physical therapist, a psychologist, a massage therapist, an acupuncturist, etc., for one’s pain complaint. However, these approaches can be expensive with limited or no insurance coverage.

 

It is being widely understood that opioids can only provide short term from severe acute pain and are ineffective for lasting relief from chronic pain. Instead, a better approach for the latter is to use a combination of alternative modalities mentioned above. But these methods take patience and effort because complying with them takes commitment and the results are not immediate. But when the patient sticks with them, the results are often very rewarding.

It is important to note that these alternative methods are much more effective once somebody is not on opioids. The reason may be psychological, at least in part, that the patients have gotten used to finding immediate relief that comes with taking opioids even if its temporary. But working closely with the therapists and with some encouragement and perseverance, patients are able to overcome chronic pain through these safe methods.

Methamphetamine Drug Rehabilitation

The abuse of illicit drugs is a serious health issue and it causes up to 200,000 lives every year. One of these dangerous drugs is Methamphetamine, which is a stimulant. It has several street names, such as speed, crank or meth. Other similar drugs in this class include levomethamphetamine and dextromethamphetamine (crystal meth).

This crystal meth is often made in illegal home-based labs. It is popular among partygoers and easily found on the streets and in the clubs. It is extremely addictive in nature and can cause dependency after just one use.

 

When a user takes crystal meth by way of snorting or swallowing, it causes a feeling of rush within 15 to 20 minutes. This effect is immediately following injection or smoking of the drug, causing extreme euphoria and a  sense of elation. This effect typically lasts for six to eight hours up to a full day. It may lead one to try more injectable drugs like heroin.

The most common cause of meth-related death is multiple organ failure
When a user is addicted to meth, it causes a withdrawal syndrome when you take away the drug. There is evidence of psychological addiction manifested by extreme shifts in mood, severe insomnia, intense paranoid and delusional behaviors. Physical symptoms include sickness, hunger, and even seizures. Addiction to meth also leads to anhedonia (inability to find joy in anything), which makes it extremely hard to stay abstinent as they seek that joy in abusing meth. It can take up to two years of abstinence to have restored mood and effect.

Prolonged use of crystal meth has devastating effects on one’s physical and mental health. It causes damage to the liver, kidneys, and lungs, leads to hypertension and vascular injury in the brain, increasing the likelihood of stroke and cardiac complications, which can be fatal.  The brain damage can be extensive and lead to stroke, epilepsy, and dementia. Smoking it can cause lung abscesses, snorting it damages nasal mucosa, and injecting it increases the risk of HIV, Hepatitis B and C, and infective endocarditis. Addicts of meth also suffer from tooth decay, psychosis, depressed mood, and weight loss as well.

 

There is now a resurgence of meth-related emergency room visits related to overdose and withdrawals. The most common cause of meth-related death is multiple organ failure. An overwhelming percentage of these patients (86%) have co-occurring HIV infection due to associated risky behavior.

The treatment for meth addiction is extensive and rigorous rehabilitation. While brief stints at a rehabilitation facility can provide short-term benefits, fully recovery warrants a much longer commitment. A treatment period of at least 90 days is recommended to ensure efficacy. The detox process is highly involved and requires close monitoring of experienced staff. The withdrawal process can be challenging and the patients can become violent, which is why a skilled rehab facility should be carefully chosen. With proper professional help, the chances of a successful recovery are fairly high.

How Long is Rehab?

There are several treatment options to choose from based on your specific abuse disorder and needs. The typical length of rehab programs are: 30, 60 and 90 days. There are extended programs as well, such as sober living facilities or halfway houses. The most important thing to consider while choosing a program is that what option has the highest likelihood of success. in that patient’s case. Most commonly availed option is that of months.

Research shows that the best outcomes occur with longer durations of treatment, but they can be costly. They may also seem intimidating at first, but do have the best chance of being successful. It should be reminded to the patient that the more patient they are with themselves and accepting of the treatment process, the more effective it is going to be.

The 30-Day Program
The patient or his/her caregivers don’t know how long the duration needs to be, so starting with this program will provide the insight into whether it is enough or a longer duration program is needed. This program offers enough time to get through any physical withdrawal symptoms and allows time to begin establishing relapse prevention techniques. A 30-day program is easier to commit to and feels less daunting. It is also the most affordable option, so many insurance companies are more likely to cover this type of program.
The first 1-2 weeks are mostly just about getting acclimated and going through the withdrawal process
The 60-Day Program
A 60-day program provides the added time that may be needed in more involved cases. In this program, there is enough time to detox from the substance and undergo therapy sessions to work through any familial, behavioral or situational circumstances at play. It also provides the opportunity to actively practice positive and healthy habits to help maintain sobriety. Insurance may not cover the full 60-day programs, however, many rehab facilities offer payment plans that make it easier to afford it.

The 90-Day Program
It is a significant time commitment to go for this program and it may seem intimidating. However, it is also most likely to be effective as it allows for the full gamut of intake and evaluation, detox, therapy, self-help groups and set up an aftercare plan. This program provides the best shot at becoming adjusted to life without drugs or alcohol. It allows for strengthening one’s skills in resisting any temptations and urges and identifying any potential triggers. This program is highly recommended for those with severe or long-term addictions.

 

Simply put,  the longer a person remains in treatment, the better the outcome. However, it is important to consider factors such as cost, fatigue and reintegrating back to daily life. The first 1-2 weeks are mostly just about getting acclimated and going through the withdrawal process. The real work begins after that – when the patient is feeling better enough to address deeper emotional issues and work on fixing them. One should plan on an extra week to ten days of detox before starting in-patient treatment if it’s under consideration.

It is critical to realize that taking the time one needs to get a solid foundation for your recovery is critical. Leaving treatment prematurely involves the risk of relapsing, and failed therapies make it less likely for future rehab treatment to work. So give the time that is needed to properly heal and succeed in the recovery process.

Drug Dependence vs Drug Addiction – How Our Alternative Approach Prevents These

There is a difference between drug addiction and dependence that is important to understand. Although some use these words interchangeably, the preferred term is now “Substance use disorder”.

Drug dependence often alludes to the physical dependence on a substance and is characterized by the symptoms of tolerance and withdrawal. It typically precedes addiction.

Addiction is characterized by a change in behavior caused by the biochemical changes in the brain after substance abuse has continued over a period of time. The addict develops full dependence on the substance and craves for it and seeks it at all costs, with no regard to the harm it causes to themselves or others. It is highlighted by irrational drug-seeking behavior.

Mental dependence is when a person desires a substance in response to an event or feeling, which are known as “triggers.” Triggers can be set off by another person, events, experiences, etc.

Drug abuse is considered to be the early stage of drug dependence

Addiction becomes evident when both, mental and physical dependence is present.

Drug abuse is considered to be the early stage of drug dependence. When the abuse becomes more frequent, the likelihood of developing a dependence disorder gets greater.

 

It is important to differentiate between addiction and substance dependence. Dependence may be present without addiction, but it frequently leads to addiction.

 

We employ an alternative approach to pain management with a goal in mid to keep patients away from drugs that they can develop dependence for. Opioids, antianxiety meds, and stimulants all have addiction potential. They develop tolerance towards it, which means that when people use it, they need more of it to have the same desired effect. This leads to higher or more frequent dosing (abuse). That eventually leads to dependence and then addiction.

 

In order to prevent this cascade of events, we try to employ alternative methods for pain relief – such as herbal supplements, nonsedating meds with no addiction potential, and nonpharmacologic activities, including acupuncture, meditation, yoga, etc. While they may be less strong pain-relieving methods as compared to opioids, they can be extremely effective. For severe, uncontrolled pain, you would require strong painkillers but a wide range of patients can achieve effective and lasting pain relief from these options. The key benefit of these is the fact that they have no addiction potential, and in most cases, promote a healthy lifestyle.

 

It is important to remember that the key tenet of medicine is – first do no harm. While necessary in some cases, opioids and other anxiolytics and sedatives have a high risk of dependence leading to addiction, which can even be life-threatening. We explore all healthy alternatives to them as much as possible to avoid these problems and heal the patients at the same time. We deeply care about the wellbeing of our patients and strive to improve their life experience as much as possible.

Prescription Drug Abuse Facts – Know the Truth!

Prescription drug abuse is defined as the use of a prescription medication in a way not intended by the prescribing doctor. This type of substance abuse may become ongoing and compulsive, despite the patient facing its negative effects in life.

Prescription drug abuse can affect any age group but it’s more common in young people. It is critical to detect prescription drug abuse early in order to control it through early intervention and to prevent it from turning into addiction.

The most commonly abused drugs include opioid painkillers, sedatives, anti-anxiety medications, and stimulants.

  • Opioids – cause constipation, nausea, euphoria, slow breathing rate, drowsiness, poor coordination.
  • Anti-anxiety medications and sedatives – cause drowsiness, confusion, unsteady gait, slurred speech, dizziness, etc.
  • Stimulants (methylphenidate, dextroamphetamine, amphetamine, dextroamphetamine) – cause reduced appetite, agitation, high body temperature, high blood pressure, irregular heartbeat, anxiety, etc.

Many people abuse prescription drugs in order to feel good, get high, relax or relieve tension
People who abuse these drugs are more likely to steal or forge prescriptions and take higher doses than prescribed. They may also seek prescriptions from more than one doctor

People abuse prescription drugs in order to feel good, get high, relax or relieve tension, to reduce appetite or increase alertness, or to maintain an addiction and prevent withdrawal.

 

People may become addicted to medications prescribed for medical conditions, such as painkillers. Past or present addictions to other substances, such as alcohol and tobacco play a role. Family history of substance abuse problems is also a risk factor. Younger age is another risk factor, although prescription drug abuse in older adults is also on the rise. Mental health issues also predispose patients to drug abuse.

 

At our center, we understand the seriousness of prescription drug abuse – how it starts, what triggers it, how it affects lives and cause devastating and sometimes fatal consequences. This is why we focus on managing pain with non-opioid methods as much as possible.

 

We pay special attention to the existing condition of the patient so that we can best address the current complaint. We take a detailed history and do proper medication reconciliation to identify red flags.

 

There are many situations where alternative methods for pain relief that have less potential for addiction are possible. Once prescribed or recommended, we follow up with our patients to ensure compliance, relief from pain and tolerance issues if any.

 

It is important to provide adequate pain relief, and we understand that alternative pain relief methods, such as non-opioid medication, meditation, yoga, exercise, herbal supplements, aren’t always as effective. We identify those patients who need serious pain relief and refer them accordingly. But in many cases, patients do find relief from these methods. These patients then, don’t get exposed to opioids that they may have side effects from, or develop dependence for and potentially abuse.

 

We also counsel the patient on their pain management and how they can choose alternative methods that are much safer. This leads to better understanding and compliance and in many cases, lead to desired results.

Stress and Alcohol Dependence – A Vicious Cycle?

Stress and drinking are a toxic combination that has somehow gained social acceptance. People who claim to experience high levels of stress admit that they drink more frequently than others. The same is true of people with anxiety and depression.

Does Stress cause Alcoholism?

While people have different reasons for drinking – from celebrating to dealing with pressures. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism defines stress as ‘subjective feeling of pressure or tension’. This is often accompanied by heightened feelings of anxiety, anger, fear, excitement, or sadness.

People who drink regularly to cope with stress initially report temporary comfort but using alcohol as a coping mechanism can lead to catastrophic consequences. For example, those who drink to cope with pressure or stress are more likely to develop a substance abuse disorder.

Drinking Alcohol Increase Stress Levels

The fact is, rather than helping you cope with stress, drinking can actually increase stress levels. Alcohol abuse would negatively impact your work or school performance, personal relationships and finances, all of which would intensify your stress.

Alcohol also stresses the body and the mind. As the body gets rid of the alcohol from the night before, blood sugar levels may fall, adding symptoms of anxiety to the existing stress.

Alcohol leads to an increased level of cortisol, a hormone the body was naturally generating as a response to stressful events. High levels of cortisol can cause inflammation, blood sugar spikes and high blood pressure. Persistent cortisol in your body can damage your central nervous system and other organs.

So, the alcohol that you have been drinking to cope with stress is actually adding to your stress levels. Seek professional help if you experience withdrawal when you try to stop drinking. A reputed alcohol and drug rehab center can help you learn ways to cope with stress in a healthy way without any dependence on alcohol or any other substance.

What Type of Anti-Craving Medications are used for Alcohol Addiction?

Why would anyone want to tiptoe through life, as if it’s a full-fledged cocktail blur?  Getting drunk daily, probably doesn’t sound so appealing to those of us that are not alcoholics. Neither does waking up craving the next liquid courage binge or nightly sweats due to our shallow veins that need to seep with alcohol.

According to the National Council on Drug and Alcohol Abuse, alcohol is the most commonly used addictive substance in the United States: 17.6 million people, or one in every twelve adults, suffer from alcohol abuse or dependence along with several million more who engage in risky, binge drinking patterns that could lead to alcohol problems.

The brains of alcoholics are wired differently, forcing them to have a chemical imbalance, where they crave dependence.  The pleasure can be corrected with certain anti-craving medications but would have to be taken over extended periods of time.

For any specific, powerful solutions in subsiding the desire for alcohol, you MUST admit you have a problem and need help.  Step One is recognizing unhealthy patterns and verbally expressing, you know there is dependence and you are powerless over alcohol and life has become unmanageable.

What can we do about the cravings, to cease taking the first drink?

The FDA has approved pharmaceuticals such as Naltrexone, Antabuse, Acamprosate, and antidepressants (SSRIs) tend to be the most effective.   

Naltrexone – stops you from your dependence on opiate drugs and alcohol.  It has been designed to block the feeling of being “high” that you get when you drink.  This should be combined with rehab and a certified counselor that will help maintain sobriety.

Antabuse – one of the oldest and most commonly used remedies that intercept with alcohol metabolism, thus producing negative side effects when alcohol is consumed, such as vomiting and painful nausea.  The problem occurs when individuals stop taking the medication because they want to drink instead of getting better.

SSRIs – are used for treating depression and balancing serotonin levels.  Alcohol is a depressant, many isolate while abusing alcohol and become hermits, putting them in a state of hibernation.  Who wouldn’t feel depressed while in this state?

Acamprosate – used in the treatment of alcohol dependence, to maintain self-restraint. It has a good success rate for subsiding cravings.

There are all-natural remedies like acupuncture that has been shown to be a highly effective form of treatment (traditionally used in Chinese medicine).

Milk thistle is richly made up of a concentrated antioxidant silymarin that aids in restoring liver functioning and further damage to your liver.

Alcohol depletes our vitamins, nutrients, and minerals – which means we should increase our B Vitamins for energy production. Glutathione becomes depleted in the body from excessive alcohol use and drinking suppresses our appetites – therefore, we consume fewer food products and our bodies lack necessary nutrients.

It is imperative to eat a diet full of antioxidants and take a glutathione supplement to stabilize levels in your body.

We want you to give up alcohol permanently and stop your cravings before they start.  This requires you to recognize what is triggering you reaching for a drink in the first place.

Visit us here https://www.pacificbayrecovery.com/ for additional information on how we can help.

Take the first step with us today and learn how to live alcohol-free and vibrant.

Alcohol Dependence VS Alcohol Abuse – What is the Difference?

Late nights partying at the club – is ok, every now and again.  Going to the occasional dinner gathering or holiday event, where alcohol is overconsumed, perfectly fine.  Binging daily or making it a continuous habit, not so cool.  This type of dangerous behavior could possibly turn deadly.  Alcohol is cunning, baffling and powerful and it is out to destroy.  It does not discriminate, care what your socioeconomic status is, the size of your family or chosen profession.

Let’s define what alcohol dependence VS alcohol abuse is:

Being dependent on an alcoholic drink, both psychologically and physically.  According to the DSM – 5, in 2013, it was reclassified as alcoholism

Once you take the first drink, you cannot stop.  You are unable to put your drink down and you are powerless over the magical liquid. You are drinking to get drunk, every single day.

Alcoholism has you telling yourself you will quit soon, but you are unable to.  For example, you mark days off on the calendar of when you will give up, the day arrives, and you cannot fathom life without a drink.

Your family and close friends notice your behavior is erratic and your life is unmanageable.

Individuals who regularly are dependent on alcohol have consciously chose to pattern themselves in disengaging full responsibility in all areas of their lives.

Often, we will see dependents significantly increase the amount of alcohol they purchase and drink, they will drink for extended periods of time and behaviors are unpredictable.

According to Alcoholics Anonymous, you might be classified as an alcoholic if you can honestly answer YES to at least four or five of the following questions http://www.aa.org/pages/en_US/is-aa-for-you-twelve-questions-only-you-can-answer.

Alcoholism:  the disease that makes you too selfish to see the havoc you created and care about the people you shattered. quotesgram.com

Alcohol abuse is commonly referred to as consuming way too much, too frequently.  You are off to the races, but you can stop after ten, even if you do not pass out.  You probably bask in the euphoria of drinking 4-5, nightly, most days of the week.

Alcohol is probably the easiest substance to abuse because the potential is there.  It’s legal, and it’s available. – Lance Penny, QuoteHD.com

Alcohol not only destroys us, it hurts people we lovingly care about, in the grueling process.  Sometimes an intervention is necessary when an alcoholic has hit rock bottom.  Our team at Pacific Bay Recovery standby to assist you and your family.

Trained, compassionate and successful healthcare experts want to guide you on your path to recovery.  You are welcome to visit our website for additional information and to ask questions https://www.pacificbayrecovery.com/.

We encourage you to seek treatment with the help of caring specialists.  Our facility is different than any other rehab center because you are not just a number with us.  Each person that checks in to our treatment center is designed a special protocol, tailored to your individual recovery needs!

Remember, one day at a time and do not quit five minutes before your miracle.  We want you to live a life of optimal wellness but that means you will face difficult challenges and you must learn to never give up!

Detoxification of Drug Use – What Steps are Necessary for Healing

Drug users have one thing on their minds - how and when will they get their next “high”.

Partying too many nights in a row during our college years …. Normal, yes! Staying out with friends and consuming too much alcohol, is tried by many people.

Getting asked to try drugs – now, that is a different animal altogether. Drug addiction is like a ferocious lion, that rears is loud roar constantly throughout the day until you feed it a pill, shot, hit or fix.

Drug users have one thing on their minds – how and when will they get their next “high”.  They fixate on thoughts of feeling euphoric, altering their state of being and the waves come crashing in around them.  Some are running from their past, carrying unnecessary baggage, numbing from tumultuous life situations and ultimately becoming addicted.

Addiction is not just being dependent upon “street drugs”, plenty of Americans become enslaved to prescription drugs, as well.

Users experience pleasurable sensations due to addiction itself or running away from painful life situations, they have not been able to find a solution for.

When users experience withdrawal, the side effects can be painfully excruciating.

Withdrawal Symptoms can Include the Following:

◻Feeling jitters/shaky/unable to control tremors

◻Headaches

◻Insomnia

◻Stress/anxiety/thoughts of suicide

◻Nauseous/flu-like symptoms/cramping in the abdominal area

◻Irritable

◻Sweating – like you are drenched – “more than a normal”

◻Blurred vision

Unfortunately, if users do not get to a detox center or treatment facility, where they will work on safely detoxifying – they could die.  Detoxing your body of harmful toxins is very challenging.  The process can be tricky and lengthy.

Drugs are depressants, just like alcohol and they alter chemicals in our body, increasing our adrenaline and producing erratic states of being.  Drug users are unpredictable and can cause bodily harm to themselves and others.

First step:  you must accept the fact and admit that you are an addict.  If we continue to lie to ourselves, we can’t face the reality of seeking proper treatment.  You must want to change your life and stay clean and sober.

Ouch …. What a major hurdle to step over but if we don’t admit our problem, it will never go away.  We will be running from ourselves for the rest of our lives. Wherever we go, there we are!  Everything becomes a blur, memories are forgotten or very distant and we isolate to hide our addictions.

Trained clinicians and passionate healthcare employees make a significant difference, on the road to recovery

Trained clinicians and passionate healthcare employees make a significant difference, on the road to recovery.  Here at  https://www.pacificbayrecovery.com/ we assist you in navigating successful care of life-altering addition.

Being just a number makes us feel less than, not important or cared for.  Here at Pacific Bay Recovery, we utilize a different approach to healing. You are treated as an individual, not an addict.  Each person that walks through our doors, is designed a different treatment recovery plan that is tailored specifically for them.

We want our patients to feel welcome, a part of instead of apart from and included like family.

We are here to help you succeed on your road to recovery!  We believe in you and will be here every step of the way.

Should you have any additional questions please send us a message https://www.pacificbayrecovery.com/contact/

Undergoing Medical Detoxification

The process of medical detoxification, or medical detox, is the first step in substance dependence and addiction which allows for an affected individual to adjust to a life without alcohol and/or drugs.

The process is performed slowly under the care and supervision of a trained and experienced healthcare professional. This is done to allow patients the opportunity to withdraw from their addictive substances without having to experience too severe withdrawal symptoms.

Withdrawal Symptoms

An important aspect to take note of is that every addiction is based on the individual and every withdrawal experience is different. Not everyone goes through the same withdrawal process and the severity of symptoms will depend on factors such as the type of drug used, the frequency of its use, how long the substance was used for, and if there is any underlying pathology.

The following are possible withdrawal symptoms that may be experienced depending on the substance that is abused:

  • Alcohol – fever, rapid heartbeat, and confusion.
  • Opioids/narcotics – excessive sweating, muscles aches, anxiety, abdominal discomfort, and agitation.
  • Methamphetamine – uncontrollable shaking, dry mouth, sweating, fatigue, and insomnia.
  • Cocaine – malaise, increased appetite, fatigue, and agitation.

Some other withdrawal symptoms that patients may experience can include:

  • Muscle tremors.
  • Depression.
  • Vomiting.
  • Diarrhea.

process is performed slowly under the care and supervision of a trained and experienced healthcare professional

Some patients may stop experiencing these issues after a few days or weeks, while others may end up struggling with symptoms that linger on for months. The period of time one may ultimately experience the withdrawal symptoms may last longer than anticipated without medical support and this can lead to relapsing back into bad habits.

Severe withdrawal symptoms that warrant definite medical intervention and support include:

  • Severe psychological distress.
  • Hallucinations.
  • Seizures or convulsions.

In the event of such issues, a medical detox administrator can ensure the safety of a patient and reduce the chances of a relapse.

How Does Medical Detox Work?

The following steps take place during a medical detoxification:

  • A trained medical practitioner will take charge over the entire withdrawal process starting with a patient’s history, current health status, and substance use history.
  • The patient will be examined and investigated further if required to rule out and manage any acute and/or chronic medical issues. Any fluid and electrolyte imbalances will also be managed here.
  • A custom detox process will be initiated for the patient to minimize the side effects of the withdrawal process as well as encourage a permanent state of recovery.
  • Depending on the substance that the patient is addicted to, tapering off the drug may be required in order to prevent any severe withdrawal effects from developing. This is especially important for substances such as alcohol, benzodiazepines, and methamphetamine.
  • Once the patients have their withdrawal symptoms under control, they will start to take part in other substance rehabilitation services such as psychotherapy and occupational therapy.

Without having to worry about physical and psychological symptoms of the withdrawal process, the patient can then start to focus on their mental health, long-term recovery plan to avoid relapses and to rebuild their lives and relationships with family members and friends.