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Drug Rehab

How Can I Help Someone Who Has Just Relapsed?

Many recovering drug users experience a relapse at some point during their recovery. This is not a time for disappointment, rather, it is a time for you to figure out how you can help them. In this article, we’re going to talk about how you can help someone who just relapsed.

 

Understanding the Relapse

The first thing for you to do is to try to understand the relapse. This could be difficult if you’ve never used drugs before, but it’s important to try.

 

Recognize that a relapse doesn’t always mean that the drug user wants their habit to start up again. Relapses are usually the result of cravings, and cravings can cause serious physiological and psychological symptoms that can be hard for a user to maintain power over. Cravings are the biggest barrier to success.

A relapse might also mean that the recovering addict is struggling with a psychological problem

A relapse might also mean that the recovering addict is struggling with a psychological problem. In many cases, relapses are caused by the same mental health problems that led someone to use drugs in the first place. If these problems aren’t addressed, then no amount of rehab is guaranteed to keep someone sober.

 

Before proceeding, it’s important to remember that this is the other person’s battle. You can support them as much as you can, but if there’s still something that they need to learn, being overbearing can actually accentuate the problem.

Reaching Someone After a Relapse

If the recovering user is open and honest about the relapse, then this is a good sign. This means that they are already aware of the problem and willing to work to ensure that it doesn’t happen again.

 

Approaching a user who is trying to be secretive about their relapse can be much more difficult. You will have to tread carefully.

 

  • Make sure that you approach them in a manner that shows you are concerned and compassionate. Don’t allow yourself to make any judgments or assumptions.
  • Let them know that you are there to talk with them about any emotional issues that they might have — having someone to talk to can make users less likely to turn to drugs to manage their issues.
  • Provide alternatives. Are they lonely? Offer to hang out more. Do they seem bored? Encourage them to join you in your hobbies and activities, or help them find some of their own.
  • Encourage them. Remind them of how well they were doing, and remind them of the reasons that they wanted to get sober in the first place.
  • Set an example. Show them that healthy living really does have benefits. This can be particularly effective if you have also struggled with addiction in the past. Share with them your experiences of addiction, let them see for themselves how much happier and healthier you are now.

 

Conclusion

It can be difficult watching someone go through a relapse. The most important thing to remember during this time is that they’re still human.

 

Treat them with love and compassion, and provide as much support as you can without being overbearing. This is the best way to encourage them to stay sober.

 

If it’s necessary, consider getting them to go through treatment.

Various Phases of Drug Rehabilitation

Drug rehabilitation is a slow process; it is not something that happens overnight. It is also a process that needs to be tailored for each person. It is not a one size fits all. Drug rehabilitation requires a series of stages an individual must complete to give them the best chance for avoiding relapse. Understanding these phases, and ensuring they are fully followed is the most important component for an addict hoping to recover from his or her disease.

The first stage of drug rehabilitation is withdrawal. This is often present in those people who have become chemically dependent on their substance of choice. The pain of withdrawal is the reason many people are not able to quit using a substance on their own.  At a drug rehabilitation center, medical detox is used to treat withdrawal. The process can last one to two weeks depending on the substance in use. Detox is one of the most difficult stages of drug rehabilitation. Once the patient makes it through detox, he or she is finally able to begin feeling better.

The goal is to have full focus on completely detoxing from the substance of choice

To start, patients will not be allowed to use their cell phones. The goal is to have full focus on completely detoxing from the substance of choice. As patients make it through the inpatient medical detox program, they will slowly begin earning privileges back. In addition, they will attend groups and meetings focused on anger management, healthy lifestyles, and learning what unhealthy patterns they have created for themselves that have led to drug dependence. This inpatient treatment often lasts a few months and is followed by a couple of years of outpatient treatment.

The ultimate goal of drug rehabilitation is to completely clear the drug from the patient’s body and have the patient return to everyday life as soon as possible. It is almost impossible for a person addicted to substances to do this on his or her own. Routine is a significant part of drug rehabilitation. This is the reason patients are encouraged to continue with intensive outpatient care following their inpatient care. Drug rehabilitation sets the tone for the rest of the patient’s life when dealing with addiction issues. Because substance abuse is such a complicated disease, holistic treatments are typically the most effective. By taking a look at the person’s overall life, and understanding all the factors that have led to drug dependence, professionals have a better chance of helping the patient remain drug and alcohol-free.

Drug rehabilitation is no easy feat. It requires a strong support system and a team of professionals to allow for the best results. Each person has a different story. Therefore, each person’s treatment plan will look a little bit different. While there are differences, there are also certain steps that are necessary for drug rehabilitation. Ridding the body of the substance tends to be the most difficult part, and is the time the patient is most likely to relapse. Once medical detox is completed, scheduled meetings, sponsors, and lifestyle changes are the best way to help a person suffering from addiction stay drug and alcohol-free.

What kind of treatment is available for drug addiction?

Drug addiction is a challenging condition that a lot of people struggle through. One of the reasons that many people have trouble managing their addiction is because they are unaware of the types of treatment available, or because they think that certain types of treatment are unavailable to them.

 

In this article, we’re going to describe some of the common forms of treatment available for drug addicts.

 

Rehabilitation for Drug and Alcohol Users

 

The most common form of treatment for drug and alcohol users is total rehabilitation. Rehabilitation can comprise several different things, all of which are important for the treatment of drug and alcohol addictions.

The most common form of treatment for drug and alcohol users is total rehabilitation

It’s important to note that most of these things can be utilized on their own to help people work through their drug addictions. However, rehab is generally believed to be more effective than any of its individual parts because together, they provide a struggling drug user with a framework to help build a new life.

 

Therapy

 

One of the most important aspects of rehab is therapy. Therapy will help struggling addicts identify the issues that led to them using drugs in the first place, and will help provide them with the tools that they need to have a happy life when they complete their program.

Group Meetings

 

Group meetings are available during many rehab programs, and they are also a viable tool to help recovering addicts maintain their sobriety after they have completed treatment. Group meetings allow people to share experiences and knowledge about their addictions.

Detox

 

Depending on the severity of your addiction and the drugs that you’re addicted to, you may be required to go through a medically supervised detox before attending treatment. These will help to ensure that you can work through all the physical withdrawal symptoms before attending treatment.

 

Alternative and Holistic Treatments

 

Many studies and research papers have recognized the importance of holistic treatment for drug addiction. Holistic treatments help to treat both the mind and body of the patient. Instead of simply pushing through withdrawal and teaching an individual how to abstain from drugs, holistic treatments aim to restore health and balance throughout the whole person.

 

These include:

 

  • Biofeedback and neurofeedback programs, which identify neural imbalances that contribute to addiction.
  • Acupuncture, Somato-Emotional repatterning, or other techniques that repattern or redirect an individual’s energy and remove blockages
  • Ibogaine therapy, a form of psychedelic-assisted therapy that has a shockingly high success rate for treating serious addictions
  • Yoga, massage, and meditation, all of which contribute to mental and physical stability and can reduce the rates of relapse

 

Ideally, the best way to treat an addiction would be to tackle it from all possible angles. This would mean that including holistic treatments with traditional rehab would be most likely to lead a recovering addict to success.

 

In Conclusion

 

Drug addiction is a serious issue, and unfortunately, it can be difficult to treat. Fortunately, there are a vast number of different treatments available for helping people work through drug addictions.

How can I know if I need to seek treatment for drug addiction?

Not every drug user is sure of whether or not they need treatment. Some users claim that they are simply recreational drug users, and do not worry that their habit is causing problems.

Rarely, this can be the case. Unfortunately, in most situations, recreational drug users are on a path towards addiction. If you’re not sure of whether or not you need to seek treatment, then this article should give you the insight that you need.

When do I need treatment?

 

The simple way to look at this is to ask yourself if you are experiencing any of the following:

 

  • Signs and symptoms of drug abuse.

  • The development of tolerance.

  • Withdrawal symptoms.

If you do not reduce your drug usage early on, you will quickly experience drug tolerance

Signs and symptoms of drug abuse are the first indicators that you need to seek treatment. If you don’t seek treatment at this stage, you will begin to develop a drug tolerance. If you still refrain from seeking treatment after you’ve developed a tolerance, you are likely to develop withdrawal symptoms.

 

Here are some more details about these stages of addiction.

 

Signs and Symptoms of Drug Abuse

 

If you are displaying any of these signs or symptoms of drug abuse, it’s a good idea to seek treatment before the problem becomes any more serious.

 

  • Spending more money on drugs than you intend to
  • Missing out on social gatherings, work, or family time to do drugs
  • Feeling like you’re unable to socialize or find motivation without drugs
  • Hiding your drug use from friends or family
  • Thinking about drugs when you’re not using them
  • Having to lie or ‘bend the truth’ in regards to your drug use
  • Experiencing problems with authorities as a result of drug use
  • Developing mood instabilities or noticing cognitive issues, like ‘brain fog’ or slow thinking
  • Noticing changes in energy levels, lethargy

 

Drug Tolerance

 

If you do not reduce your drug usage early on, you will quickly experience drug tolerance.

 

A tolerant user requires larger and larger doses of a substance to experience the same effects that they did when they first started using. In most cases, drug tolerance will ‘plateau’ – that is, it will level out at a certain phase.

 

Most often, in this phase, users are unable to achieve the desirable effects that they once did. A person becomes physically or psychologically dependent on the drug and may experience withdrawal symptoms.

 

Withdrawal Symptoms

 

Withdrawal symptoms occur when your body is physically dependent on a drug. At this stage, you will require the drug to function normally. If you aren’t able to use the drug, you may experience symptoms like:

 

  • Sweating
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Pain in the joints and bones
  • Restless legs syndrome
  • Anxiety, depression, and mood instability
  • Inability to socialize
  • Insomnia or excessive sleep
  • Loss of appetite, weight loss
  • Itchy, crawling skin
  • Shaking
  • Diarrhea and digestive issues
  • Dehydration
  • Seizures

 

In Conclusion

 

If you experience any signs and symptoms of drug addiction or abuse, it’s best to seek treatment as soon as possible. If you don’t, then you run the risk of developing a more serious addiction down the road.

 

Written by Nigel Ford

Keys to Successful Drug Addiction Recovery

Drug addiction recovery will look different for each person because all people are unique. Some people may need a stronger emphasis on certain parts of the recovery, and some people may struggle more with other parts. While drug addiction recovery is unique for each person, there are a few key factors that can benefit all people undergoing drug addiction recovery.

First off, typically the longer a treatment program is, the more successful it will be. This especially applies to those addicts who are deep in their addiction. Addiction occurs because neuro pathways in the brain have changed to make the addict need a drug. Every time the addict uses his or her substance of choice, those pathways are reinforced and become even harder to change. Therefore, a person who has been suffering from addiction for many years may benefit from a more extended treatment program than someone who is a new user. Some research has found that programs over 90 days offer the best chance for success.

It is also important for the person undergoing recovery treatment to have a strong network of people who understand their struggle. While healthy family and friend relationships are key to help an addict’s recovery last, it is equally as important for an addict to feel they have a network of people who understand what they have been through. Treatment programs that encompass a full lifestyle change versus solely focusing on no longer using typically have the best results.

While outside influences and support groups are important, at the end of the day, the addict is the most important part of drug addiction recovery. Patients need to be willing to put themselves first, to show up to all meetings, get a sponsor, go to family and individual therapy, re-learn how to manage money and be a productive member of society, and ultimately forgive themselves. Many patients end up relapsing because the guilt and shame they feel are just too much to bear. A key part of drug addiction recovery success is rooted in forgiveness. Forgiveness allows the addict to put themselves first and take the necessary steps to maintain their recovery and avoiding relapse.

There is no shortcut to a successful drug recovery. Patients and families must be willing to put in the work, both in the short term and the long term, to ensure the person suffering from addiction can stay sober. The most important thing is for an addict to undergo recovery for themselves. They need to remember it is ok to prioritize their recovery process, whether that means meetings every day, or therapy, or getting a whole new group of friends. Following the recovery process without taking any shortcuts is key to remaining sober.

Drug addiction recovery is not a one size fits all. Some people may stay in a treatment program for a few months, while others may remain for a year. Each person’s circumstance and needs are different. It is key to find a recovery program that focuses on creating a customized treatment plan. For this reason, it is also important for addicts not to compare themselves to others and to never lose hope. While recovery will not be the same for everyone, having a strong support system, sticking to the program, and forgiving oneself are all necessary keys for an addict to have a successful recovery.

Prescription Drug Treatment

Overcoming prescription drug addiction is one of the most difficult things a person can do. For this reason, it is important to have a team of professionals helping along the way. Prescription drug addiction can negatively affect all aspects of a person’s life, from the ability to hold a job to the ability to maintain healthy relationships. People become addicted to prescription drugs for a wide variety of reasons, such as obtaining the drugs from their own doctor or taking the drugs without a prescription. Regardless of what started the addiction, those who find themselves addicted to prescription drugs should trust professionals to help.

While there are a wide variety of prescription drugs that people abuse, the most common include opiates, stimulants, and sedatives. Oftentimes, there are signs that a person is on the path to addiction, such as, “losing” prescriptions or asking for refills early, visiting multiple doctors, mood swings, and irritability when drugs are not available to name a few. Addiction to different prescription drugs causes different symptoms in the patient. For example, stimulant abuse can manifest as high blood pressure, hostility, and irregular heartbeat. Sedative abuse can manifest as confusion or memory problems. Opiate abuse manifests as low blood pressure, depression, or gastrointestinal problems.

Addiction to different prescription drugs causes different symptoms in the patient
Left untreated, prescription abuse can lead to mental and emotional health problems, issues with keeping a job or with the law, and in the worst cases, prescription addiction can lead to death. While some people take prescription drugs that are not prescribed to them, the majority of prescription drug addicts began taking the medication in the direction of their doctor. Addiction has been shown to have a genetic component. Therefore, some people are more predisposed to addiction than others. It is difficult to know for sure who these people are prior to prescribing them medications. Many of these medications are prescribed after surgery, or to treat pain. Experiencing the “good feelings” that come with the drugs in addition to the bodybuilding up tolerance to the drug, can lead people to take higher and higher doses over time. Thus, leading to drug addiction. In short, most people do not set out to become addicted to prescription drugs. It is a by-product of them following their doctors’ instructions.

Prescription drug abuse is not just a problem in adults, it is a problem in teens as well. People who start abusing prescription drugs as teens are more likely to use other substances as well. Prescription drug abuse is very difficult for a person to overcome on his or her own. Pacific Bay Recovery utilizes a variety of approaches, including a support team, to help people overcome their addiction. Those who choose to seek help at Pacific Bay Recovery will benefit from the support team, along with various medications to help with withdrawal symptoms and drug cravings.

Those who are interested in getting help for their prescription drug addiction should contact Pacific Bay Recovery at (858) 263-9700. Complimentary and confidential evaluations are always offered so patients can understand the methods Pacific Bay Recovery utilizes to help those addicted to prescription drugs.

Drug Abuse in the United States

Drug abuse is a major problem in the United States. It can come in the form of alcohol, tobacco, illicit drugs, or prescription drugs. While some of these substances are legal, when people begin using any kind of substance in an effort to get high, it becomes drug abuse. Drug abuse is a problem that affects a wide range of people, from teenagers to adults, students to professionals, athletes, you name it. Drug abuse can occur for a wide variety of reasons. Therefore, those suffering from drug addiction require a personalized treatment plan in order to begin the process of recovery.

Alcohol is one of the most common drugs. Many people drink alcohol, and in moderation, it can be ok. However, 6.5% of the population in the U.S. admits to heavy drinking. Heavy drinking can lead to problems such as liver and pancreas disease. Women who abuse alcohol while pregnant can event affect their child. Many people discount signs of alcohol abuse because alcohol is “legal.” However, it is a very widely abused substance and should be taken seriously,

Hallucinogens such as PCP and LSD are commonly used among drug abusers
Marijuana is another widely abused substance and is very popular among the teenage demographic. While it may not be as fatal as other drugs, it can still negative effects on the user. Cocaine is another abused drug. People who use cocaine typically do so for its stimulant effects. It keeps people awake for long period s of time and can give the user euphoric effects. While the effects typically only last half an hour, the drug can quickly alter the person’s body putting them at a much higher risk of stroke. Hallucinogens such as PCP and LSD are commonly used among drug abusers. While it’s much harder to overdose from these drugs, many people who utilize them are at risk of secondary injuries from distorted perception such as falling.

Heroin is possibly the most addictive drug in the world. Unfortunately, in recent years, heroin use in the U.S. has surged due to the crackdown on prescription medications. Heroin is extremely addictive because it changes brain function. With regular use, those who use heroin quickly develop a tolerance and find themselves unable to function without more and more heroin in their systems. Another reason for heroin is so addictive is due to the painful detox. Even with one use, people may start feeling withdrawal symptoms after the drug has worn off. People who inject heroin will find themselves at a higher risk of blood-borne infections due to dirty needles. They are also at risk for Hepatitis C, HIV, kidney disease, abscesses, and even death.

There is a multitude of drugs people choose to abuse for various reasons. Sometimes it is because they were legally prescribed, sometimes it is because they were just curious to try a drug. However, regardless of the user’s drug of choice, treatment, and a strong support system is always important in the road to recovery. Much of the recovery includes detox, therapy, and coping mechanisms to help the drug abuser lead a healthier and drug-free lifestyle.

Psilocybin Abuse

Psilocybin is a psychoactive substance contained in several species of mushrooms, which are consumed recreationally. Psilocybin/mushrooms are categorized as psychedelic drugs (or hallucinogens) and are considered to be a Schedule I controlled substance without any indications for medical use by the United States Drug Enforcement Administration 2. However, there is some evidence to suggest that it may have some therapeutic utility for some conditions, such as depression. Approximately, 1.2 million people over the age of 12 have been reported to be users of hallucinogens, and young people with a co-occurring major depressive disorder have been found to be more likely to use hallucinogenic drugs than those without that diagnosis.

These mushrooms containing psilocybin are typically ingested or drank as a brewed beverage. They are hallucinogenic and people consume it to experience a “good trip”, which are vivid perceptual effects (visual and auditory hallucinations) and changes in perception of time. Sometimes, user experience a “bad trip”, which comprise negative experiences while under the influence, and can have lasting effects on the user. Other symptoms include detachment from reality or self, feeling of spiritual experiences, intense emotions, increased respiration, temperature, and blood pressure, heart palpitations, tremors, loss of appetite, dry mouth, sleep disturbances, nausea, blurred vision, dilated pupils, loss of coordination, paranoia, and in extreme cases, psychosis. These users are prone to injury or death as a result of poor judgment while under the influence of psilocybin. Furthermore, they are also at increased risk of poisoning and potential death from accidentally ingesting a misidentified, poisonous mushroom.

These mushrooms containing psilocybin are typically ingested or drank as a brewed beverage

About 4.2% of the users experience what is known as the hallucinogen persisting perception disorder, which includes flashbacks or re-experiencing of psilocybin intoxication despite having abstained from magic mushroom use for an extended period of time.

Persistent use of psilocybin can indeed result in addiction. The signs of psilocybin addiction include craving for mushrooms and spending a lot of time and effort seeking them and using them despite failure to fulfill personal obligations, or having a concern for social/interpersonal problems or health issues. These abusers also repeatedly fail to cut down or quit using mushrooms.

Psilocybin/mushroom treatment becomes necessary for someone who abuses it to the point that they become out of touch with reality. The treatment plan is targeted at weaning them from psilocybin/mushroom dependency. The good news is that psilocybin is not that addictive, so there is no major chemical/pharmacologic dependence; however, the psychological dependence is quite strong. Things get complicated when there is polysubstance abuse. This is not uncommon in these users, as they tend to use other agents as well, such as alcohol, benzodiazepines, stimulants or opioids. Such users would always require a rigorous detox program and rehabilitation in order to have a full recovery. There are various programs especially designed to address not only these addiction issues but also the underlying psychological issues that predispose them to addiction in the first place.

Hashish addiction

Hashish is a plant derivative substance, extracted from the trichomes, flowers, and fragments of leaves and stems of the cannabis plant. It contains tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is the same active ingredients found in marijuana, but at a much higher concentration (up to 15% in hashish as compared to 5% in marijuana). Hash oil is another substance produced by solvent extraction of hashish/marijuana and ends up having even a higher dose of THC.

Based on the way it is prepared, it comes in various forms and preparations. Hash oil comes as a golden syrupy-like substance. Hash is typically consumed by smoking or ingestion, but the effects are much faster and stronger when smoked due to faster entry into the bloodstream through the lungs. How does hashish work? The active substance of hashish, THC acts by binding to cannabinoid receptors in the neurons, which results in physical, emotional, and cognitive effects.

The active substance of hashish, THC acts by binding to cannabinoid receptors in the neurons, which results in physical, emotional, and cognitive effects
While many studies have shown that there are medicinal effects of cannabis products, particularly a substance known as cannabidiol, it should be noted that the United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) still considers cannabis a Schedule I controlled substance, meaning that it is considered to have no medicinal use and a high potential for abuse.

So what does hash abuse look like? Hashish is typically smoked in pipes or bongs. Some users add hashish to food or brew it in a tea, and other casual ways. However, given the potent concentration of THC present in hashish, it has a higher potential for addiction and more serious side effects as compared to marijuana. The typical signs and symptoms of hash addiction include euphoria, increased relaxation, hunger, sore throat, panic, paranoia, anxiety, tachycardia, hypertension, impaired coordination, lack of motivation, impaired concentration, and hallucinations.

Long-term effects of hash abuse include immunosuppression, respiratory issues from chronic lung damage, sexual dysfunction in males, cardiovascular issues, mental issues, etc. As expected, hashish users face significant social issues as well, such as job loss, financial issues, legal issues, strained relationships with spouses, children, and other loved ones, just to name a few.

The use of hashish among teens is disproportionately high. There are several reasons for that – most of them having to do that mainstream acceptance and legalization (in some states) of marijuana, and coupling hashish with it as a comparable alternative, which of course, it isn’t. There is a tendency is downplay the potential for abuse, physical dependence, and other harmful effects of hashish. The teens are even more susceptible to its deleterious effects because of their greater propensity for the development of a substance use disorder. They are also more susceptible to peer pressure and having an underlying ADHD or conduct disorder which increases their predilection for hashish addiction, further leading to polysubstance abuse.

Health awareness and education play an important role in helping teenagers understand the hazards of hashish use. Preventing hashish addiction can also prevent falling prey to other even more serious drugs such as heroin and cocaine.

Opioid Alternatives for Chronic Pain Relief

As we all know, we are in an opioid epidemic in this country. But the good news is that the numbers are beginning to go down. Having said that, the job is still not done. The main reason we still high opioid use (and eventually abuse) is that we still have a very high prevalence of chronic pain (almost 1 in 10). And opioids are still being overprescribed. Hence, there is a pressing need to use opioid alternatives for chronic pain relief.

Not only that opioids have a very high addiction potential  (15-fold greater risk for those who have been taking opioids for three or more months), but also they are not very effective in the management of chronic pain. There are a number of alternative strategies that have been found to be effective against chronic pain, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, acupuncture, medical massage, physical therapy, etc.

Chronic pain is defined as a pain condition that lasts for more than six months. Studies have shown that chronic pain involves the same areas of the brain as the emotional disturbance. Emotional pain is treated with alternative methods, so it is worth exploring if chronic pain can be effectively managed that way as well.
Opioid use has yet to be seen whether these efforts made any difference in preventing addiction
Many healthcare providers have made initiatives to minimize the chance of opioid addiction. Pain clinics assess people for risk of addiction, have them sign a medication contract, educate and counsel them on the risks of addiction and other side effects, perform urine drug testing, undertake pill counts, etc. But it has yet to be seen whether these efforts made any difference in preventing addiction.

The opioid alternatives that are being used for chronic pain management include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), antidepressants and antiseizure medications. Nonpharmacologic options include cognitive behavioral therapy, exercise therapy, physical therapy, etc. There are also some interventional approaches such as nerve blocks, neuromodulation, etc. These methods have been found to be effective in chronic pain management.

There is now one-stop-shop type of pain clinics where the patient can see a physician, a physical therapist, a psychologist, a massage therapist, an acupuncturist, etc., for one’s pain complaint. However, these approaches can be expensive with limited or no insurance coverage.

 

It is being widely understood that opioids can only provide short term from severe acute pain and are ineffective for lasting relief from chronic pain. Instead, a better approach for the latter is to use a combination of alternative modalities mentioned above. But these methods take patience and effort because complying with them takes commitment and the results are not immediate. But when the patient sticks with them, the results are often very rewarding.

It is important to note that these alternative methods are much more effective once somebody is not on opioids. The reason may be psychological, at least in part, that the patients have gotten used to finding immediate relief that comes with taking opioids even if its temporary. But working closely with the therapists and with some encouragement and perseverance, patients are able to overcome chronic pain through these safe methods.