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Drug Rehab

Odds of Dying from Opioid Overdose Surpasses Automobile Accidents

Death rate statistics in the United States now point to a startling turnaround with the likelihood of dying by opioid drug overdose surpassing the chances of dying in an automobile accident. Automobile accident deaths have long been the balancing point in conversations around the country. It is frequently said that a person has more chances of dying in an automobile than they do in an airplane. This is true.
You also hear that automobile deaths are the number one cause of preventable death. That is no longer the case, according to the Odds of Dying report put out by the National Safety Council (NSC). Opioids, their numbers say, are now the No. 1 preventable death threat in the United States.

The numbers are not only scary today, but the numbers have been on a rampage since 2011, coinciding with the arrival of street market fentanyl, which has proved to be as lethal as any illicit drug in the country. Put another way: The odds of dying by opioid overdose have probably not peaked yet. The problem, in part, is getting the message out to the public. “I can tell you without hesitancy, the general public does not like death rates,” Pain Medicine News quoted NSC statistics manager Ken Kolosh as saying. The aim of the NSC is, in fact, to put statistics in a manner in which the public can fully grasp their meaning. As such, the numbers are frightening, as they should be.

Opioids, their numbers say, are now the No. 1 preventable death threat in the United States

It breaks down this way: The U.S. population was approximately 326 million in 2017. The number of accidental opioid-related deaths came to 43,036 that year. Simply divide 326 million by 43,036 and you get one in 7,569, which are the odds of dying of an opioid-related overdose in the entire year. When you divide that by the average life expectancy, which is 78.6 years, you get one in 96. That’s the odds of dying of an opioid-related accident for someone born in the United States in 2019. Do the same numbers for other causes of death and you have heart disease, a one in six chance; cancer a one in seven chance, chronic respiratory disease one in 27, suicide one in 88. If born in 2019, the odds of dying in an automobile accident are one in 103.

Further, the odds of dying in an automobile accident have been improving over the last 10 years, while the odds of dying from overdose have been getting worse … and worse. According to the CDC, there were 47,600 opioid-related overdoses in 2017, which is 67. 8 percent of all drug overdoses. Are we done being scared? Absolutely not. But Pacific Bay Recovery is absolutely confident we have the team in place to turn your drug or alcohol addiction around.

Confidence and fear do not cancel each other out. We certainly know this is tough. We know this is difficult. We know you did not start out life seeking to be addicted to drugs or alcohol. We know how difficult this can be. We know this is scary, but we also know and abide by one absolute: Emotions can change. What if the source of your fear today – facing recovery – becomes a source of your proudest accomplishment in the future? We understand you are scared today, but how will you feel when you get back on your feet when you find you are no longer beholden to any mood altering substance or behavior?

Recovery is scary on day one. It’s scary on day two. It’s frightening for a while. We can help you get through those early fears and move on to a full, fruitful, healthy life in the future. What may seem scary, depressing and isolating today will look very different in the future. Recovery is about restoring hope. It’s about waking up every day with hope in your heart. Every day you have regained control of your life is a day of hope. You can win this struggle.

Don’t be a statistic. Call Pacific Bay Recovery, San Diego’s top drug and alcohol recovery program. Call 858-263-9700 today.

Opioid Alternatives for Chronic Pain Relief

As we all know, we are in an opioid epidemic in this country. But the good news is that the numbers are beginning to go down. Having said that, the job is still not done. The main reason we still high opioid use (and eventually abuse) is that we still have a very high prevalence of chronic pain (almost 1 in 10). And opioids are still being overprescribed. Hence, there is a pressing need to use opioid alternatives for chronic pain relief.

Not only that opioids have a very high addiction potential  (15-fold greater risk for those who have been taking opioids for three or more months), but also they are not very effective in the management of chronic pain. There are a number of alternative strategies that have been found to be effective against chronic pain, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, acupuncture, medical massage, physical therapy, etc.

Chronic pain is defined as a pain condition that lasts for more than six months. Studies have shown that chronic pain involves the same areas of the brain as the emotional disturbance. Emotional pain is treated with alternative methods, so it is worth exploring if chronic pain can be effectively managed that way as well.
Opioid use has yet to be seen whether these efforts made any difference in preventing addiction
Many healthcare providers have made initiatives to minimize the chance of opioid addiction. Pain clinics assess people for risk of addiction, have them sign a medication contract, educate and counsel them on the risks of addiction and other side effects, perform urine drug testing, undertake pill counts, etc. But it has yet to be seen whether these efforts made any difference in preventing addiction.

The opioid alternatives that are being used for chronic pain management include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), antidepressants and antiseizure medications. Nonpharmacologic options include cognitive behavioral therapy, exercise therapy, physical therapy, etc. There are also some interventional approaches such as nerve blocks, neuromodulation, etc. These methods have been found to be effective in chronic pain management.

There is now one-stop-shop type of pain clinics where the patient can see a physician, a physical therapist, a psychologist, a massage therapist, an acupuncturist, etc., for one’s pain complaint. However, these approaches can be expensive with limited or no insurance coverage.

 

It is being widely understood that opioids can only provide short term from severe acute pain and are ineffective for lasting relief from chronic pain. Instead, a better approach for the latter is to use a combination of alternative modalities mentioned above. But these methods take patience and effort because complying with them takes commitment and the results are not immediate. But when the patient sticks with them, the results are often very rewarding.

It is important to note that these alternative methods are much more effective once somebody is not on opioids. The reason may be psychological, at least in part, that the patients have gotten used to finding immediate relief that comes with taking opioids even if its temporary. But working closely with the therapists and with some encouragement and perseverance, patients are able to overcome chronic pain through these safe methods.

Methamphetamine Drug Rehabilitation

The abuse of illicit drugs is a serious health issue and it causes up to 200,000 lives every year. One of these dangerous drugs is Methamphetamine, which is a stimulant. It has several street names, such as speed, crank or meth. Other similar drugs in this class include levomethamphetamine and dextromethamphetamine (crystal meth).

This crystal meth is often made in illegal home-based labs. It is popular among partygoers and easily found on the streets and in the clubs. It is extremely addictive in nature and can cause dependency after just one use.

 

When a user takes crystal meth by way of snorting or swallowing, it causes a feeling of rush within 15 to 20 minutes. This effect is immediately following injection or smoking of the drug, causing extreme euphoria and a  sense of elation. This effect typically lasts for six to eight hours up to a full day. It may lead one to try more injectable drugs like heroin.

The most common cause of meth-related death is multiple organ failure
When a user is addicted to meth, it causes a withdrawal syndrome when you take away the drug. There is evidence of psychological addiction manifested by extreme shifts in mood, severe insomnia, intense paranoid and delusional behaviors. Physical symptoms include sickness, hunger, and even seizures. Addiction to meth also leads to anhedonia (inability to find joy in anything), which makes it extremely hard to stay abstinent as they seek that joy in abusing meth. It can take up to two years of abstinence to have restored mood and effect.

Prolonged use of crystal meth has devastating effects on one’s physical and mental health. It causes damage to the liver, kidneys, and lungs, leads to hypertension and vascular injury in the brain, increasing the likelihood of stroke and cardiac complications, which can be fatal.  The brain damage can be extensive and lead to stroke, epilepsy, and dementia. Smoking it can cause lung abscesses, snorting it damages nasal mucosa, and injecting it increases the risk of HIV, Hepatitis B and C, and infective endocarditis. Addicts of meth also suffer from tooth decay, psychosis, depressed mood, and weight loss as well.

 

There is now a resurgence of meth-related emergency room visits related to overdose and withdrawals. The most common cause of meth-related death is multiple organ failure. An overwhelming percentage of these patients (86%) have co-occurring HIV infection due to associated risky behavior.

The treatment for meth addiction is extensive and rigorous rehabilitation. While brief stints at a rehabilitation facility can provide short-term benefits, fully recovery warrants a much longer commitment. A treatment period of at least 90 days is recommended to ensure efficacy. The detox process is highly involved and requires close monitoring of experienced staff. The withdrawal process can be challenging and the patients can become violent, which is why a skilled rehab facility should be carefully chosen. With proper professional help, the chances of a successful recovery are fairly high.

Drug Rehabilitation with Pain management

There are many causes of chronic pain – injury, accident or illness. One of the biggest healthcare crisis of our times is the opioid abuse crisis. Opioids are typically prescribed for severe and/or chronic pain, to which the patient ultimately develops tolerance and becomes addicted. However, an integrated approach that includes pharmacotherapy, physical therapy, individual counseling, and group support, can be the right choice for patients suffering from chronic pain. Drug rehab with pain management includes this approach for the effective treatment of chronic pain.

According to a recently published study, patients who suffer from drug addiction and chronic pain tend to receive inadequate pain control compared to non-addicted patients. Doctors in rehab facilities may be hesitant to provide opioid pain medications given their predisposition to addiction. However, these patients deserve adequate relief is the pain is severe, the same way as any other patient. Drug rehabilitation for chronic pain is an approach that treats the patient’s substance abuse without compromising pain control.
Drug rehab with pain management focuses on not only the substance abuse and pain control components but also other facets of health
Chronic pain can debilitating — physically, emotionally and socially. The end results of under-treated pain can be isolation, depression, substance abuse or worse, suicide.

Chronic pain is actually underreported. Many patients suffer from it and assume it as a part of growing old.  Adequate pain control can dramatically improve their quality of life and functionality.

It is true as well that prescription painkillers can be abused. These patients are vulnerable to getting addicted as they develop tolerance to them. This is why it is extremely important to provide them with pain in a controlled setting with careful monitoring. Patients undergoing drug rehab are in a structured program under careful supervision and it is important to provide them with adequate pain relief and monitor them for warning signs of abuse.

 

Having said that, giving alternatives to opioids for pain relief is advisable in patients with a past or current history of substance abuse. Some of the non-opioid options for pain relief, with varying degree of strength and efficacy, include buprenorphine, psychological counseling and behavioral modification, massage, acupuncture, hydrotherapy and herbal therapy, physical therapy, etc.

Psychotherapy can help identify negative behaviors and thought patterns that contribute to addiction, but it is not an actual pain relief method. Drug rehab with pain management focuses on not only substance abuse and pain control components but also other facets of health, such as nutrition, exercise, etc. As drug addicts tend to ignore these, addressing them is likely to help them regain physical and mental health. Pain should not be ignored. It should be addressed by the right clinicians and a personalized plan for pain relief should be sketched out keeping in view the unique history and health status of each patient. A comprehensive approach is likely to yield successful results in the recovery process of the patients and improve their overall quality of life.

Substance Abuse Treatment Plan

Addiction affects parts of the brain involved in reward and motivation, learning and memory, and control over behavior, rendering the addict feeling helpless in coping with it. It takes a highly specialized approach to treat someone’s addiction. Addiction is a chronic problem and fixing it requires a long-term plan to stop using completely and recover their lives.

The goals for addiction treatment include getting the patient to stop using drugs, stay drug-free, and be productive in the family, at work, and in society.

An effective treatment program should identify addiction as being a complex but treatable disease and that the treatments need to be personalized, as no single treatment works for everyone. It is important to account for the fact that people need to have quick access to treatment. It needs to be a holistic program that effectively addresses all of the patient’s needs, not just the drug use. The program needs to be comprehensive, with a focus on counseling and other behavioral therapies. Medications are also necessary, especially when combined with behavioral therapies. Patients’ needs change, so the treatment plans must be reviewed often and modified to fit the current status.

When patients don’t receive treatment following detox, they are very likely to resume their drug use

Treatment should also address other possible coexisting mental disorders. Treatment sometimes has to be involuntary to be effective. Of course, drug use during treatment must be monitored continuously. It is also necessary to screen these patients for HIV/AIDS, hepatitis B and C, tuberculosis, and other infectious diseases as well as educate them on ways to reduce their risk of contracting these illnesses. Following treatment, a long-term follow-up is necessary to prevent relapse. Follow-up care may include community- or family-based recovery support systems.

Medications and devices can be used to manage withdrawal symptoms, prevent relapse, and treat co-existing conditions. Detoxification is the first step of the treatment. When patients don’t receive treatment following detox, they are very likely to resume their drug use. While medications are the mainstay option in detox, recently FDA granted the use of an electronic stimulation device, NSS-2 Bridge, for use in helping reduce opioid withdrawal symptoms.

Medications are also helpful in relapse prevention. They can help to re-establish normal brain function and decrease cravings. They are especially helpful in opioid, tobacco and alcohol addiction treatment.

These medications are used for the following addictions:

 

Opioids: Methadone (Dolophine®, Methadose®), buprenorphine (Suboxone®, Subutex®, Probuphine® , Sublocade™), and naltrexone (Vivitrol®).

 

Nicotine addiction: bupropion (Zyban®) and varenicline (Chantix®).

 

Alcohol: Disulfiram (Antabuse®), Acamprosate (Campral®), Naltrexone have been FDA-approved for treating alcohol addiction and a fourth, topiramate, has shown promise in clinical trials.

Behavioral therapies can greatly help these patients be aiming to modify their attitudes and behaviors related to drug use and by trying to increase healthy life skills.
Most of the programs involve individual or group drug counseling and include cognitive-behavioral therapy, multidimensional family therapy, motivational interviewing, etc.

Inpatient or residential treatment can be necessary in some cases, especially for those with more severe problems. Licensed residential treatment facilities offer 24-hour structured and intensive care, including safe housing and medical attention, and aimed at helping the patient live a drug-free, healthy and productive lifestyle after treatment.

How Long is Rehab?

There are several treatment options to choose from based on your specific abuse disorder and needs. The typical length of rehab programs are: 30, 60 and 90 days. There are extended programs as well, such as sober living facilities or halfway houses. The most important thing to consider while choosing a program is that what option has the highest likelihood of success. in that patient’s case. Most commonly availed option is that of months.

Research shows that the best outcomes occur with longer durations of treatment, but they can be costly. They may also seem intimidating at first, but do have the best chance of being successful. It should be reminded to the patient that the more patient they are with themselves and accepting of the treatment process, the more effective it is going to be.

The 30-Day Program
The patient or his/her caregivers don’t know how long the duration needs to be, so starting with this program will provide the insight into whether it is enough or a longer duration program is needed. This program offers enough time to get through any physical withdrawal symptoms and allows time to begin establishing relapse prevention techniques. A 30-day program is easier to commit to and feels less daunting. It is also the most affordable option, so many insurance companies are more likely to cover this type of program.
The first 1-2 weeks are mostly just about getting acclimated and going through the withdrawal process
The 60-Day Program
A 60-day program provides the added time that may be needed in more involved cases. In this program, there is enough time to detox from the substance and undergo therapy sessions to work through any familial, behavioral or situational circumstances at play. It also provides the opportunity to actively practice positive and healthy habits to help maintain sobriety. Insurance may not cover the full 60-day programs, however, many rehab facilities offer payment plans that make it easier to afford it.

The 90-Day Program
It is a significant time commitment to go for this program and it may seem intimidating. However, it is also most likely to be effective as it allows for the full gamut of intake and evaluation, detox, therapy, self-help groups and set up an aftercare plan. This program provides the best shot at becoming adjusted to life without drugs or alcohol. It allows for strengthening one’s skills in resisting any temptations and urges and identifying any potential triggers. This program is highly recommended for those with severe or long-term addictions.

 

Simply put,  the longer a person remains in treatment, the better the outcome. However, it is important to consider factors such as cost, fatigue and reintegrating back to daily life. The first 1-2 weeks are mostly just about getting acclimated and going through the withdrawal process. The real work begins after that – when the patient is feeling better enough to address deeper emotional issues and work on fixing them. One should plan on an extra week to ten days of detox before starting in-patient treatment if it’s under consideration.

It is critical to realize that taking the time one needs to get a solid foundation for your recovery is critical. Leaving treatment prematurely involves the risk of relapsing, and failed therapies make it less likely for future rehab treatment to work. So give the time that is needed to properly heal and succeed in the recovery process.

7 Tools to Beat Addiction

Substance abuse is a serious mental issue. Addiction can be of various types and can get extremely challenging to get rid of. Let’s review some of the most useful tools that can be used to overcome addiction.

 

  • Socialize (with non-addicts)
    Interacting with people without a habit that you’re trying to beat is a very basic yet effective way to overcome it. It works by providing a perspective of how people behave in normal settings and shows that it is possible and easier to normalize than perceived in your head. It also provides motivation and encouragement. In ideal cases, the company provides support and anchorage when it seems that succumbing to your addiction is the only way to survive.

 

  • Read

Reading books is a very engaging experience. It keeps your mind from staying in the vicious circle of thinking about your “fix” and you may have a better chance of not succumbing to your craving. Books can serve as wonderful reminders to stay on course.

 

  • Being Accountable
    Find a friend (or work with your counselor) to whom you can honestly account your feelings, cravings and indeed, slip-ups. Having such a person to confess to and get feedback from helps us to stay the course and focus on facing the reality and not lie to ourselves as addiction tends to make people do.

Anybody can fight addiction for a better future

  • Work on your weak spots
    Contemplate on what triggers your craving psychologically or if there are certain cues that you in the state of mind – an event, occurrence, place, environment, person, feeling, memory, etc. Then see if you create a situation where you are least confronted with those stimuli – especially places and people.

 

  • Distract Yourself
    You can have a list of “distractions,” activities that can take her mind off of your addiction. It can be anything like crossword puzzles, novels, Sudoku, walking the dog, card games, movies, etc. Like reading, it helps to keep you engaged and from succumbing to your craving.

 

  • Exercise
    This is extremely helpful. It helps your mental health tremendously to perform light, regular exercises. It is obviously good for your physical health but it also gives you a sense of purpose, motivation, goals, engaging sessions and a brighter perspective. If done at a gym, it can lead to socializing with healthy people who are likely to motivate you to have a healthier lifestyle and approach to things. The release of endorphins is also thought to help you fight addiction and feel happiness.

 

  • Keep a Record
    Record your thoughts, your feelings. Jot down accounts of how you faced your craving, how you resisted or reacted to it -especially your small but important successes overcoming it. If you look back and read your journal entries about your down times, it will give you perspective as to how you’ve fought and how far you’ve come. It will provide an opportunity to build up on that and do even better.

All these tools can help you fight what seems to be an undefeatable enemy within. With some support and persistence, using these tools go a long way in giving you strength in this fight.

Opioid Use Disorder

Opioid Use Disorder is a new diagnosis introduced in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). It is a combination of two previous diagnoses – Opioid Dependence and Opioid Abuse.

There are a variety of different opioid drugs, including street drugs such as heroin, and those used in healthcare settings such as methadone, morphine, codeine, oxycontin, etc. The most notorious type of opioid use disorder is of Heroin (10% of people aged 12-17 years old in the United States with opioid use disorder take heroin). The most common one is that of analgesic opioids.

 

The diagnosis of opioid use disorder is made when someone has been using opioid drugs and has at least two of the following symptoms within a 12 month period:

  • Abuse – Taking more than intended/prescribed.
  • Dependence – Wanting to control use without success.
  • Seeking – Spending a lot of time obtaining, taking, or recovering from the effects of opioid drugs.
  • Craving – Having a strong urge towards it.
  • Dysfunction – Failing to carry out important roles at home, work or school because of opioid use.
  • Neglect – Continuing to use opioids, despite the use of the drug causing relationship or social problems.
  • Preference – Giving up or reducing other activities because of opioid use.
  • Lack of concern – Using opioids even when it is physically and psychologically harmful.
  • Tolerance – Needing a higher dose for the same effect
  • Withdrawal – when opioids are not taken.

Chronic users can develop normal physical responses to prolonged drug exposure

Addictive disorders are primarily psychological in nature. Chronic users can develop normal physical responses to prolonged drug exposure, but that alone does not constitute an opioid use disorder if they have no cravings for the drug, no difficulty using appropriate dosages, and no lifestyle problems as a result of taking the drug. Using an illicit opioid drug such as heroin does not mean that the individual has an opioid use disorder unless they manifest signs of addiction. It is possible for heroin users to control their drug use, and show no psychological, physical or social signs of addiction. They do not qualify for this diagnosis as they are able to regulate their drug use, use safer methods of taking the drug, can stop when they need to, and keep their drug use from hurting their social life. These users who are able to control and manage their use tend to be more psychologically healthy and socially well-adjusted. Conversely, those who develop heroin use disorder often have very significant psychological problems, to begin with.

The most common way to screen substance abuse disorder is the CAGE questionnaire. If someone answers yes to any of these questions, they would undergo a more comprehensive assessment.

C – “cut down” – “Have you tried to cut down on your drinking or drug use, but couldn’t?”

A -“annoyed” – “Are family and friends annoyed about your drinking or drug use?”

G -“guilty” –  “Do you ever feel guilty about your drinking or drug use?”

E -“eye opener” – “Do you have a drink or use drugs as an ‘eye-opener” in the morning?

There are other more sophisticated tools, such as Opioid Risk Tool, which calculates the factors that place individuals at greater risk of having a substance use disorder, such as the past family and personal history of substance use, a history of childhood sexual abuse, age, and history of past or present psychological disorders, etc.

What is Cannabis Use Disorder and How Do I Overcome It?

Marijuana abuse is far more common than people realize and affects almost 4 million citizens of the United States of America each and every year. Cannabis use has increased significantly in the USA as it has become legal in more and more states. But as this decriminalization occurs, so does the incidence of cannabis use disorder increased. How do you identify if you have an issue with marijuana abuse and what is available for people with this disorder?

 

What is a cannabis use disorder? Do I have one?

 

Smoking marijuana in itself does not mean you are addicted. There is a strict definition of abuse which is when the use of the substance begins to impact one’s life in a negative way. Officially it is defined as

 

Cannabis use disorder is the continued use of cannabis despite clinically significant distress or impairment which usually includes:

 

  • A strong desire to take cannabis
  • Difficulties in controlling its use
  • Persisting in its use despite harmful consequences
  • A higher priority is given to cannabis use than other activities and obligations
  • Increased tolerance
  • A physical withdrawal state when the drug is not ingested”

 

If you or somebody you know suffers from these symptoms, they may be suffering from a cannabis use disorder.

Cannabis use disorder is the continued use of cannabis despite clinically significant distress or impairment

The withdrawal symptoms can be significant in around one-half of patients. The symptoms can include:

 

  • Anxiety
  • Irritability
  • Depression
  • Restlessness
  • Disturbed sleep
  • GI symptoms such as diarrhea or constipation
  • A reduced appetite

 

As such some patients wish to enter a rehabilitation facility during this time. These symptoms often resolve within a few weeks – but they can be abated via various medical treatments in the inpatient facilities.

 

 

How do they treat marijuana abuse?

 

Treatment is often undertaken at specialist rehabilitation centers across the United States of America. This treatment is, of course, dependent on the individual and will be tweaked dependent on your specific set of circumstances. However, there are a number of options and treatment often involves:

 

  • Psychological treatments like cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), which tries not to focus on the pass but on the present. CBT tries to change your actions by helping you understand why you act in a certain way.
  • Other psychological treatments include things like motivational interviewing, whereby the therapist tried to induce the motivation to quit from within you.
  • No medicine treats the actual disease, but there are a number of medications that can be prescribed during the withdrawal period (eg anxiolytics like Diazepam can be given on a short-term basis to reduce symptoms of anxiety during the withdrawal).

 

 

If you or somebody you know is suffering from an addiction such as marijuana abuse then get in contact with a specialist rehabilitation centre today. Cannabis abuse is an epidemic across the USA today but is severely under recognised and under treated. Often family practitioners are not equipped to deal with this mental health disorder and specialist treatment is often the best option.

Drug Dependence vs Drug Addiction – How Our Alternative Approach Prevents These

There is a difference between drug addiction and dependence that is important to understand. Although some use these words interchangeably, the preferred term is now “Substance use disorder”.

Drug dependence often alludes to the physical dependence on a substance and is characterized by the symptoms of tolerance and withdrawal. It typically precedes addiction.

Addiction is characterized by a change in behavior caused by the biochemical changes in the brain after substance abuse has continued over a period of time. The addict develops full dependence on the substance and craves for it and seeks it at all costs, with no regard to the harm it causes to themselves or others. It is highlighted by irrational drug-seeking behavior.

Mental dependence is when a person desires a substance in response to an event or feeling, which are known as “triggers.” Triggers can be set off by another person, events, experiences, etc.

Drug abuse is considered to be the early stage of drug dependence

Addiction becomes evident when both, mental and physical dependence is present.

Drug abuse is considered to be the early stage of drug dependence. When the abuse becomes more frequent, the likelihood of developing a dependence disorder gets greater.

 

It is important to differentiate between addiction and substance dependence. Dependence may be present without addiction, but it frequently leads to addiction.

 

We employ an alternative approach to pain management with a goal in mid to keep patients away from drugs that they can develop dependence for. Opioids, antianxiety meds, and stimulants all have addiction potential. They develop tolerance towards it, which means that when people use it, they need more of it to have the same desired effect. This leads to higher or more frequent dosing (abuse). That eventually leads to dependence and then addiction.

 

In order to prevent this cascade of events, we try to employ alternative methods for pain relief – such as herbal supplements, nonsedating meds with no addiction potential, and nonpharmacologic activities, including acupuncture, meditation, yoga, etc. While they may be less strong pain-relieving methods as compared to opioids, they can be extremely effective. For severe, uncontrolled pain, you would require strong painkillers but a wide range of patients can achieve effective and lasting pain relief from these options. The key benefit of these is the fact that they have no addiction potential, and in most cases, promote a healthy lifestyle.

 

It is important to remember that the key tenet of medicine is – first do no harm. While necessary in some cases, opioids and other anxiolytics and sedatives have a high risk of dependence leading to addiction, which can even be life-threatening. We explore all healthy alternatives to them as much as possible to avoid these problems and heal the patients at the same time. We deeply care about the wellbeing of our patients and strive to improve their life experience as much as possible.