Call today to schedule your free and confidential consultation.

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Drug Rehab Center

Benefits of Inpatient Addiction Recovery

Many people are familiar with the 12 step program addicts undergo when attempting to heal from their addiction problems. While this program is important, it is not always enough by itself. After patients complete medical detox, inpatient treatment is often recommended to help the patient down the right road to recovery. Inpatient recovery typically addresses holistic measures to help the person better cope with his or her addiction.

For addicts to fully recover, and live a healthy life, treatment must address both psychological and medical components of addiction. Addressing both parts typically leads to better outcomes. Inpatient rehabilitation provides access to physicians who prescribe medication to help change brain chemistry, curb alcohol or drug cravings, and reduce or eliminate the unpleasant symptoms associated with withdrawal. Inpatient programs typically last for 90 days or three months. Research shows that 90-day programs produce success rates that are more than double the success rates of 30-day programs. After completing the inpatient rehabilitation, 12 step programs are more likely to succeed.

. After inpatient care is completed, patients are eased into an outpatient program

Many people are hesitant to consider inpatient treatment because they cannot work. While this may discourage some, most companies offer medical leave for their employees. After inpatient care is completed, patients are eased into an outpatient program, at which point they can begin working again. In many cases, by the point a patient comes into inpatient rehabilitation, they have already lost their job due to their addiction. Fortunately, many inpatient clinics help patients to find new jobs as part of their recovery. The goal of inpatient rehabilitation is to help patients adjust to a healthier way of living. This means all parts of life, including work, are taken into account. Help with resumes, interviews, and determining their new path in life is all part of the rehabilitation process.

When initially beginning inpatient therapy, phones are taken away. While patients do have the ability to call their families, it may be an initial shock. As the patient continues to make progress, certain rewards and incentives, such as the phone, are given back to the patient. Drug testing is typically done daily to help monitor levels in patients. While it may seem like inpatient rehabilitation comes with a lot of “rules,” the rules are designed to help the patient break the unhealthy cycle, and regain control of his or her life. New habits are introduced in place of old habits. Some of these healthy habits include yoga, counseling, personal training, massage therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, nutrition, and meditation.

Inpatient rehabilitation is an important step in living a healthy, alcohol, and drug-free life. Inpatient recovery bridges the gap between medical detoxification and outpatient therapy. While inpatient recovery does require more cost and more missed work, it is a three month period that doubles the patient’s chance for success when compared to the standard 30-day program. The longer a person stays in treatment, the more time that person has to develop the necessary skills to remain abstinent. Inpatient recovery is a major investment. However, it is an investment in your health and life that has been scientifically proven to pay off in the long run.

What Happens When An Addict Fails Treatment Recovery?

Ideally, all addiction patients who go through the recovery process will recover from their disease and never relapse. Unfortunately, the world is not perfect, and many times, patients relapse. After a relapse, many addiction patients may find it very difficult to return to the recovery process. However, it is important to remember than many people experience relapse, and it is never too late, nor is a patient ever too far gone to begin the recovery process again.

One of the most challenging things for a patient to do is face their family and mend broken relationships. Restoring broken relationships with the family is an important step in ensuring the addict has a strong support system to help with rehabilitation. Often, it is helpful for the addict and family to have an unbiased person facilitating the initial conversations. Many families do not fully understand addiction, and in some cases, may actually be enabling the addict in their disease.

Another step to successful recovery includes creating healthy boundaries within the family. This can be everything from financial boundaries, boundaries in what is discussed about treatment and the addict’s disease, and understanding sensitive topics. Every family is different, so these boundaries may differ. However, all addicts need boundaries to help them in their recovery. If things go back to exactly the way they were, they may run the risk of relapse again. This is also why it is also important for addicts to seek out support groups aside from their families who may better understand their situation such as Alcoholics Anonymous or similar groups.

It is important for addicts who have failed treatment to remember that as long as they are willing to try again, it is a misstep, not a failure. Many people in the world have relapsed multiple times. The beauty of addiction treatment programs is they always offer a place for addicts to start when they are ready to deal with their disease.

Typically, people who follow the rehabilitation program steps will have success in remaining sober. However, relapse usually occurs when one or more of the steps is not followed. If treatment recovery fails, the addict, the family, and the rehabilitation center need to figure out where the breakdown was, so relapse does not occur again. In some cases, it may be that the addict was skipping appoints, or reverted to an old friend group, and in other cases, it may be that the addict’s family was enabling them.

There is a multitude of reasons why treatment recover fails. But, the important thing to remember is there is always time to start again. When an addict and their family are committed to fighting addiction, there is hope. Many rehabilitation centers encompass treatment for the patient, along with education for the family. Addiction is a terrifying disease and can do a lot of harm to a person’s life. It may take several tries before successful treatment occurs. The most important thing is to remember never to give up hope. There is always help right around the corner.

Keys to Successful Drug Addiction Recovery

Drug addiction recovery will look different for each person because all people are unique. Some people may need a stronger emphasis on certain parts of the recovery, and some people may struggle more with other parts. While drug addiction recovery is unique for each person, there are a few key factors that can benefit all people undergoing drug addiction recovery.

First off, typically the longer a treatment program is, the more successful it will be. This especially applies to those addicts who are deep in their addiction. Addiction occurs because neuro pathways in the brain have changed to make the addict need a drug. Every time the addict uses his or her substance of choice, those pathways are reinforced and become even harder to change. Therefore, a person who has been suffering from addiction for many years may benefit from a more extended treatment program than someone who is a new user. Some research has found that programs over 90 days offer the best chance for success.

It is also important for the person undergoing recovery treatment to have a strong network of people who understand their struggle. While healthy family and friend relationships are key to help an addict’s recovery last, it is equally as important for an addict to feel they have a network of people who understand what they have been through. Treatment programs that encompass a full lifestyle change versus solely focusing on no longer using typically have the best results.

While outside influences and support groups are important, at the end of the day, the addict is the most important part of drug addiction recovery. Patients need to be willing to put themselves first, to show up to all meetings, get a sponsor, go to family and individual therapy, re-learn how to manage money and be a productive member of society, and ultimately forgive themselves. Many patients end up relapsing because the guilt and shame they feel are just too much to bear. A key part of drug addiction recovery success is rooted in forgiveness. Forgiveness allows the addict to put themselves first and take the necessary steps to maintain their recovery and avoiding relapse.

There is no shortcut to a successful drug recovery. Patients and families must be willing to put in the work, both in the short term and the long term, to ensure the person suffering from addiction can stay sober. The most important thing is for an addict to undergo recovery for themselves. They need to remember it is ok to prioritize their recovery process, whether that means meetings every day, or therapy, or getting a whole new group of friends. Following the recovery process without taking any shortcuts is key to remaining sober.

Drug addiction recovery is not a one size fits all. Some people may stay in a treatment program for a few months, while others may remain for a year. Each person’s circumstance and needs are different. It is key to find a recovery program that focuses on creating a customized treatment plan. For this reason, it is also important for addicts not to compare themselves to others and to never lose hope. While recovery will not be the same for everyone, having a strong support system, sticking to the program, and forgiving oneself are all necessary keys for an addict to have a successful recovery.

Prescription Drug Treatment

Overcoming prescription drug addiction is one of the most difficult things a person can do. For this reason, it is important to have a team of professionals helping along the way. Prescription drug addiction can negatively affect all aspects of a person’s life, from the ability to hold a job to the ability to maintain healthy relationships. People become addicted to prescription drugs for a wide variety of reasons, such as obtaining the drugs from their own doctor or taking the drugs without a prescription. Regardless of what started the addiction, those who find themselves addicted to prescription drugs should trust professionals to help.

While there are a wide variety of prescription drugs that people abuse, the most common include opiates, stimulants, and sedatives. Oftentimes, there are signs that a person is on the path to addiction, such as, “losing” prescriptions or asking for refills early, visiting multiple doctors, mood swings, and irritability when drugs are not available to name a few. Addiction to different prescription drugs causes different symptoms in the patient. For example, stimulant abuse can manifest as high blood pressure, hostility, and irregular heartbeat. Sedative abuse can manifest as confusion or memory problems. Opiate abuse manifests as low blood pressure, depression, or gastrointestinal problems.

Addiction to different prescription drugs causes different symptoms in the patient
Left untreated, prescription abuse can lead to mental and emotional health problems, issues with keeping a job or with the law, and in the worst cases, prescription addiction can lead to death. While some people take prescription drugs that are not prescribed to them, the majority of prescription drug addicts began taking the medication in the direction of their doctor. Addiction has been shown to have a genetic component. Therefore, some people are more predisposed to addiction than others. It is difficult to know for sure who these people are prior to prescribing them medications. Many of these medications are prescribed after surgery, or to treat pain. Experiencing the “good feelings” that come with the drugs in addition to the bodybuilding up tolerance to the drug, can lead people to take higher and higher doses over time. Thus, leading to drug addiction. In short, most people do not set out to become addicted to prescription drugs. It is a by-product of them following their doctors’ instructions.

Prescription drug abuse is not just a problem in adults, it is a problem in teens as well. People who start abusing prescription drugs as teens are more likely to use other substances as well. Prescription drug abuse is very difficult for a person to overcome on his or her own. Pacific Bay Recovery utilizes a variety of approaches, including a support team, to help people overcome their addiction. Those who choose to seek help at Pacific Bay Recovery will benefit from the support team, along with various medications to help with withdrawal symptoms and drug cravings.

Those who are interested in getting help for their prescription drug addiction should contact Pacific Bay Recovery at (858) 263-9700. Complimentary and confidential evaluations are always offered so patients can understand the methods Pacific Bay Recovery utilizes to help those addicted to prescription drugs.

Psilocybin Abuse

Psilocybin is a psychoactive substance contained in several species of mushrooms, which are consumed recreationally. Psilocybin/mushrooms are categorized as psychedelic drugs (or hallucinogens) and are considered to be a Schedule I controlled substance without any indications for medical use by the United States Drug Enforcement Administration 2. However, there is some evidence to suggest that it may have some therapeutic utility for some conditions, such as depression. Approximately, 1.2 million people over the age of 12 have been reported to be users of hallucinogens, and young people with a co-occurring major depressive disorder have been found to be more likely to use hallucinogenic drugs than those without that diagnosis.

These mushrooms containing psilocybin are typically ingested or drank as a brewed beverage. They are hallucinogenic and people consume it to experience a “good trip”, which are vivid perceptual effects (visual and auditory hallucinations) and changes in perception of time. Sometimes, user experience a “bad trip”, which comprise negative experiences while under the influence, and can have lasting effects on the user. Other symptoms include detachment from reality or self, feeling of spiritual experiences, intense emotions, increased respiration, temperature, and blood pressure, heart palpitations, tremors, loss of appetite, dry mouth, sleep disturbances, nausea, blurred vision, dilated pupils, loss of coordination, paranoia, and in extreme cases, psychosis. These users are prone to injury or death as a result of poor judgment while under the influence of psilocybin. Furthermore, they are also at increased risk of poisoning and potential death from accidentally ingesting a misidentified, poisonous mushroom.

These mushrooms containing psilocybin are typically ingested or drank as a brewed beverage

About 4.2% of the users experience what is known as the hallucinogen persisting perception disorder, which includes flashbacks or re-experiencing of psilocybin intoxication despite having abstained from magic mushroom use for an extended period of time.

Persistent use of psilocybin can indeed result in addiction. The signs of psilocybin addiction include craving for mushrooms and spending a lot of time and effort seeking them and using them despite failure to fulfill personal obligations, or having a concern for social/interpersonal problems or health issues. These abusers also repeatedly fail to cut down or quit using mushrooms.

Psilocybin/mushroom treatment becomes necessary for someone who abuses it to the point that they become out of touch with reality. The treatment plan is targeted at weaning them from psilocybin/mushroom dependency. The good news is that psilocybin is not that addictive, so there is no major chemical/pharmacologic dependence; however, the psychological dependence is quite strong. Things get complicated when there is polysubstance abuse. This is not uncommon in these users, as they tend to use other agents as well, such as alcohol, benzodiazepines, stimulants or opioids. Such users would always require a rigorous detox program and rehabilitation in order to have a full recovery. There are various programs especially designed to address not only these addiction issues but also the underlying psychological issues that predispose them to addiction in the first place.

Celebrity Addicts

Are celebrities more prone to addictions than the rest of us mortal human beings who must survive everyday stressors like paying our bills and getting that stain out of the carpet? This is a fair question. And we don’t have an exact answer for you.

But one author-therapist spoke up on the topic, stating clearly that celebrity life includes enormous pressures that most people never experience. Yes, we mortals have severe stress points in our lives. And, yes, the frequent lists on occupations and addictions often names doctors, miners, policemen as very vulnerable to alcoholism and drug abuse. Other lists name forest management, farming, fishermen and sales jobs as high on the list of vulnerable occupations. Seldom do you see celebrities on these lists.

But think of the pressure to be a movie actor, especially one who is the star of the show. If the movie bombs, seldom do the newspapers announce the writer’s career is imperiled. But they frequently write, “if the actor doesn’t find a moneymaker soon to put on his or her resume, their career is cooked.”

 

actors are doubly vulnerable simply because they are sensitive, creative and put their creativity out there for the entire world to see

What’s the problem here? Stress is in the eye of the beholder to a certain degree. If you like chaos, then chaos is not so stressful for you. And, where does this leave doctors? If they make a mistake, the results could be life-changing – devastating. Tell me an actor has more stress than that?

Los Angeles-based Dr. Jenn Mann, an author of a book on relationships, says that actors are doubly vulnerable simply because they are sensitive, creative and put their creativity out there for the entire world to see. In addition, companies invest millions, often hundreds of millions of dollars, in that actor or actress, which puts a lot of heavy expectations on the thespian’s shoulders.

Big Time Pressure

“You take that sort of personality that is already vulnerable to these issues and then you put them in a situation where there is enormous pressure to perform,” Hollywood Life quoted Dr. Mann as saying. “That is unbelievable pressure that very few people can even comprehend in the regular world, because a lot of people go, ‘oh, you’re just getting paid so much money, who cares?” But this is also putting yourself out there and your work and your future,” she said.

What about Money?

Ah, remember money? That’s supposed to be the root of all evil and sometimes it certainly is. What do you do if you’re having an anxiety attack because you have to perform at work the next day – as a doctor, an actor or a businessperson? You might have a drink to calm your nerves. This can become a habit with anyone who lets the alcohol begin to take control. There may be genetic factors involved. You don’t need too much of a push before alcoholism can be diagnosed.

The actor that sparked the interview in Hollywood Life was unknown to me and his name is irrelevant, but he was one of the lead actors to a mega-huge television show. The interesting points of his case included his descriptions in previous interviews about how the months when his character was getting tons and tons of media attention were his worse moments on the show.

Wait — don’t actors live for that kind of attention? Well, yes and no. It’s a double-edged sword. The attention means you will be eligible for a part in another high paying show. But it also means your every move is subjected to public scrutiny, both on the screen and off.

Opportunity

Meanwhile, all that money not only represents pressure but an opportunity. Everyone wants to be your best pal, be part of your life, buy you a drink or have you buy them one … money, money, money. When your paycheck has six zeroes on it, temptations are affordable. Do you want to take the edge off? Six zeroes can certainly make that happen.

In fact, as Dr. Mann said, when you reach “a certain level of stardom,” you suddenly become surrounded by handlers, people who want your attention, your signature, your time, your endorsement. Life begins to swirl and drugs and alcohol can certainly make that swirling go away for a while before the swirling becomes spiraling out of control.

Make A Call

Are you or someone you love suffering from addiction issues? If so, professional help is a phone call away. Call Pacific Bay Recovery in San Diego at 858-263-9700. Call soon and break the cycle.

What is Cannabis Use Disorder and How Do I Overcome It?

Marijuana abuse is far more common than people realize and affects almost 4 million citizens of the United States of America each and every year. Cannabis use has increased significantly in the USA as it has become legal in more and more states. But as this decriminalization occurs, so does the incidence of cannabis use disorder increased. How do you identify if you have an issue with marijuana abuse and what is available for people with this disorder?

 

What is a cannabis use disorder? Do I have one?

 

Smoking marijuana in itself does not mean you are addicted. There is a strict definition of abuse which is when the use of the substance begins to impact one’s life in a negative way. Officially it is defined as

 

Cannabis use disorder is the continued use of cannabis despite clinically significant distress or impairment which usually includes:

 

  • A strong desire to take cannabis
  • Difficulties in controlling its use
  • Persisting in its use despite harmful consequences
  • A higher priority is given to cannabis use than other activities and obligations
  • Increased tolerance
  • A physical withdrawal state when the drug is not ingested”

 

If you or somebody you know suffers from these symptoms, they may be suffering from a cannabis use disorder.

Cannabis use disorder is the continued use of cannabis despite clinically significant distress or impairment

The withdrawal symptoms can be significant in around one-half of patients. The symptoms can include:

 

  • Anxiety
  • Irritability
  • Depression
  • Restlessness
  • Disturbed sleep
  • GI symptoms such as diarrhea or constipation
  • A reduced appetite

 

As such some patients wish to enter a rehabilitation facility during this time. These symptoms often resolve within a few weeks – but they can be abated via various medical treatments in the inpatient facilities.

 

 

How do they treat marijuana abuse?

 

Treatment is often undertaken at specialist rehabilitation centers across the United States of America. This treatment is, of course, dependent on the individual and will be tweaked dependent on your specific set of circumstances. However, there are a number of options and treatment often involves:

 

  • Psychological treatments like cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), which tries not to focus on the pass but on the present. CBT tries to change your actions by helping you understand why you act in a certain way.
  • Other psychological treatments include things like motivational interviewing, whereby the therapist tried to induce the motivation to quit from within you.
  • No medicine treats the actual disease, but there are a number of medications that can be prescribed during the withdrawal period (eg anxiolytics like Diazepam can be given on a short-term basis to reduce symptoms of anxiety during the withdrawal).

 

 

If you or somebody you know is suffering from an addiction such as marijuana abuse then get in contact with a specialist rehabilitation centre today. Cannabis abuse is an epidemic across the USA today but is severely under recognised and under treated. Often family practitioners are not equipped to deal with this mental health disorder and specialist treatment is often the best option.

The Dangers of Abusing Prescription Stimulant Drugs

 

The most commonly abused prescription stimulant medications include amphetamines (Dexedrine and Adderall) and methylphenidate (Ritalin and Concerta).

The amphetamines and methylphenidate are used to manage medical conditions such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and works by changing the amounts of specific neurotransmitters (hormones) in the brain. The medication’s function then is to:

  • Help increase an affected person’s ability to pay attention.
  • Control behavioral problems.
  • Allow the patient to stay focused for a longer period of time.
  • Reduce daytime fatigue and for this reason, is also indicated for those patients who struggle with narcolepsy.

Methylphenidate can also be prescribed off-label to help manage treatment-resistant cases of:

  • Major depression.
  • Bipolar mood disorder.

Use by Students

These prescription stimulants are sometimes used by students to help enhance their mental abilities in order to improve their concentration for purposes of studying. There are individuals who state that denying these students the medications, who are essentially not struggling with any conditions that the medications are indicated for, would be denying them the opportunity to better themselves academically.

However, if one is to prescribe individuals who do not exhibit any pathology medications that alter their brain chemistry, then one is bound to expose them to certain adverse effects.

Dependence and Addiction

Psychological dependence and addiction to amphetamines and methylphenidate are possible, especially if taken at high doses as a recreational drug. As with all addictive drugs, dependence on prescription stimulants causes changes in the brain’s neurotransmitter levels and this leads to addictive behavior.

Overdose

Addiction can lead to an overdose of prescription stimulants. This can result in central nervous system overstimulation which can cause issues such as:

  •        Agitation.
  •        Tremors.
  •        Vomiting.
  •        Muscle twitching.
  •        Euphoria.
  •        Increased reflexes.
  •        Confusion.
  •        Delirium.
  •        Hallucinations.
  •        Hyperthermia.
  •        Flushing.
  •        Sweating.
  •        Headaches.
  •        Heart palpitations.
  •        Rapid heart rate.
  •        Abnormal heart rhythm.
  •        Elevated blood pressure.
  •        Dry mucous membranes.

A severe overdose which will require immediate medical attention may result in the following problems:

  •        Increased core body temperature.
  •        Paranoia.
  •         Convulsions.
  •         Repetitive movements.
  •         A severe drop in blood pressure.
  •         Rapid muscle breakdown.
  •         Sympathomimetic toxidrome or an adrenergic storm which is a rapid increase of epinephrine levels in the body which causes the heart rate to spike and possibly become abnormal.

Fortunately, a prescription stimulant drug overdose is rarely fatal if one receives the appropriate medical care.

Rehabilitation

Becoming addicted to prescription stimulant drugs can become problematic, especially when the medication is taken in higher than required dosages as this can lead to the above-mentioned problems.

There are rehabilitation centers available where inpatient rehabilitation is offered. This will be beneficial to patients who are addicted to prescription stimulant drugs as the following services will be made available to them:

  • Safe withdrawal from the stimulant drug.
  • Management of any underlying mental health issues or stressors.
  • Psychological counseling to aid in the development of coping skills.
  • Time and study management or any other advice regarding everyday tasks and functions so that one doesn’t have to rely on taking stimulant drugs on a recreational basis.

 

Withdrawal Symptoms Caused by Stopping Addictive Substances and How to Manage Them

Substance dependence occurs when an individual who is using addictive substances such as alcohol, narcotics, prescription medications, or other illegal drugs experiences withdrawal symptoms if they stop using the product. The body becomes used to the substance to the point that it needs the product in order to function adequately.

Drug Addict Going Through Addiction CrisisOnce the substance is discontinued, the body will experience the following general signs and symptoms within a few hours:

  • Excessive yawning.
  • Increased sweating.
  • Muscles aches and pains.
  • Increased agitation or anxiety.
  • Mood swings.
  • A runny nose and teary eyes as well as other flu-like symptoms.
  • Cravings for the addictive product.
  • Difficulty with getting to sleep (insomnia).

These are not life-threatening issues but they can make the affected individual very uncomfortable which is why they rather choose to continue using the addictive substance.

Certain withdrawal symptoms may also specifically occur when discontinuation the following substances:

  • Depressants such as benzodiazepines and alcohol – agitation, anxiety, tremors, hallucinations, and seizures.
  • Narcotics such as opioid pain medications and heroin – Bone, joint, and muscle aches, gastrointestinal issues, and increased pain sensitivity.
  • Stimulants such as the amphetamines and cocaine – anxiety, aggression, depression, sweating, fevers, stomach aches, and tremors.
  • Bath salts – paranoia, tremors, depression, and sleeping difficulties.

The duration, intensity, and severity of withdrawal symptoms will depend on the following factors:

  • The length of the addiction to the substance.
  • How much of the substance is in the individual’s body when they discontinue the product.
  • How many different substances are used by the individual at the same time.
  • If there are any physical or mental disorders present.
  • How long it takes the substance to be eliminated from the body (half-life of the product).

Medical detox

  • Medical detoxification (detox) is a therapy used to help addicts to go through the withdrawal process with as little discomfort as possible.
  • Alcohol and drug rehabilitation programs use applicable medications with appropriate dosing regimens to help reduce the duration and severity of withdrawal symptoms when the offending substance is discontinued.
  • This is performed on an inpatient basis so that the patient can be monitored by healthcare personnel in order to provide the correct level of care to the patient and so that any emergency situations may be dealt with properly.
  • Admission to inpatient substance rehabilitation centers is the safest way to detox, especially when co-morbid mental health disorders affect the patient. Psychological counseling and psychiatric consultations are offered to these patients to help address mental health problems.
  • There are various methods of medical detox including the “cold-turkey” method (meaning stopping the medication with only medical supervision), short-term medicated detox, and long-term medicated detox.

The following medications are prescribed for patients to help reduce withdrawal symptoms associated with the respective addictive substances:

 

  • Short–acting benzodiazepines – used in those who use stimulants such as alcohol as well as in marijuana users.
  • Desipramine – used in long-term stimulant users.
  • Disulfiram – prescribed for users to prevent them from using alcohol. The medication causes a metabolite of alcohol to build up in the body causing moderate to severe gastrointestinal symptoms.
  • Methadone or buprenorphine – used in addicts of narcotics such as heroin and opioid pain medications.

Outpatient Rehab – Is it Right for Me?

For those whose lives still remain functional, outpatient rehab may be an option to consider. With this type of program, you see a counselor locally and work with therapy groups, attend AA/NA meetings, and complete assignments to help you with becoming drug- and/or alcohol-free. While you do have the freedom to live your life, random drug/alcohol tests are likely with this type of program, and you must be willing to submit to them, especially if it is court ordered outpatient care.

Addictive Medications and Minor AddictionsMinor Addictions

If you have trouble removing drugs and/or alcohol from your life, outpatient treatment may be right for you. This is especially the case if your life does not revolve solely around drinking and using drugs.  When you blow off friends, family, or general adult responsibilities to bar hop, consume an entire 12-pack of beer or bottle of alcohol, it’s time to get help. If you’d rather sit and completely lose your mind to get high instead of cleaning the house, grocery shopping, or spending time with your kids, it’s time to get help. This might be the right situation for you since you’re still able to function in daily life.

Remain in your Own Home

When attending outpatient rehab, you don’t have to deal with the stress of being in a strange place with conflicting personalities or those that are near death from their addictions. Being able to stay home with your family or in transitional housing while getting treatment has proven higher success rates. You have to take this program just as seriously as you would an inpatient center.

The transitional housing idea is to keep you in a dry household with others that are also in recovery. You still go to work, pay your bills, and have some freedom. There are curfews and some house rules to adhere to while seeing your counselor, participating in maintaining the home, and attending group sessions.

Live Normal Life without Drugs or Alcohol

In an outpatient program, you learn how to live life and make use of the extra time that you’d normally spend drinking or getting high. Some counselors suggest taking night college courses, painting, cooking, or taking up a hobby. It’s also an open invitation to get more involved with your spouse and children. Taking a more active role in your family is healing in itself and has plenty of benefits. You’re treating the addiction with your family, rather than being separated from them and feeling awkward returning home in a sober state.

Outpatient programs don’t work for everyone. This is the case with addicts where the only method of detection is by a blood sample or spinal tap. These expensive procedures have to be paid for by the patient and most cannot afford them. For those that recognize their problem and cannot afford inpatient care, this is a good place to start. It can be considered as temporary treatment while you look for financial aid or “scholarship” funds to get clean and live a healthy, substance-free lifestyle again.