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Alcohol Detox

How To Stay Sober During the COVID-19 Quarantine?

Nobody could have expected how quickly the COVID-19 situation blew out of control.

One of the measures that have been taken to reduce the spread of the disease is making sure that people stay away from each other. This has resulted in people socially distancing, isolating, and flat-out quarantining themselves.

While this might be an admirable thing to do in regard to (regarding) the spread of the disease, this can present a number of (several) issues – especially for people who are struggling with their recovery after going through rehab. In this article, we’ll talk about how you can hope to stay sober during the COVID-19 quarantine.

 

Why Quarantine Is a Risk

 

When you’re in recovery, it’s important to stay busy and connected. You want to fill up your time as much as possible with activities that are socially, mentally, and emotionally fulfilling. Basically, you want to make sure that you fill all the same voids that you were filling with drugs.

Unfortunately, being thrown into quarantine can toss a wrench in someone’s recovery plan. Suddenly you might not be able to go to A.A. or N.A. meetings. You might be laid off and find yourself with too much free time. Maybe you aren’t able to connect with your new, sober friends or your support group.

There are a lot of reasons that quarantine could lead to some serious risks. Here’s what you can do to minimize the risk.

Reducing Risks and Staying Sober in Quarantine

 

These are some tips that might help you stay sober during the quarantine.

 

  •   Stay connected. And not just with social media. Take at least 15-20 minutes out of your day to connect with a friend or family member over the phone or with video chat. This will help make sure that you feel emotionally fulfilled and socially connected. Without these two things, you may be more prone to drinking alcohol or using drugs.

 

  •   Practice your hobbies. Many people who have been working for a long time have a hard time re-engaging with their hobbies. Make sure to try out an old hobby, or find a new one. Pick up a paintbrush, write a poem or a story, make a sculpture, break out the old card collection – anything is better than thinking about drugs or alcohol!

 

  •   Watch your stress. You’d figure that having time off work would make you less stressed out, but some people find the notion of having unfilled free time to be equally stressful and can lead to addiction. This is a good time to ask yourself why you’re uncomfortable having nothing to do. Take up meditating, get to know yourself, and learn to enjoy your own company.

 

  •   Don’t catch the fear. At this point, everyone’s doing what they can. Being scared will not help the problem, and in your fear, you become more likely to turn to drugs or alcohol. Turn off the news. Focus on solutions instead of problems. Again, pick up meditation. “Modern society tells everyone to panic because things are out of control. A Christian would tell you to relax because everything’s out of your control.”

 

Conclusion

Without a doubt, we were living through the craziest time in the 20th century – but we don’t need to let that scare us. Follow these tips, and you’ll be able to pull through your quarantine sober and with grace – and you can avoid having to go to detox after quarantine’s over.

 

3 Extremely Dangerous Drugs

All drugs are dangerous, some deadlier than others. Here is a look at three extremely dangerous drugs.

Opiates

Opiates are some of the most addictive drugs with terrible effects. Opiates include heroin, fentanyl, and some prescription drugs, such as promethazine-codeine or Oxycontin. Most can be injected, snorted, swallowed, or smoked.

Upon consumption, opiates release an enormous amount of dopamine (the “feel good” chemical) in the brain. Users become addicted to that dopamine release. Opioids and opiates even change the way an addict thinks and behaves, such as no concern of negative consequences.

Long-term use produces negative long-term effects, such as liver failure, kidney failure, changes in brain function, and even death.

Stimulants

Stimulants, or uppers, include cocaine, crack, and meth (methamphetamine), and abusing Adderall and Ritalin. Stimulants cause the brain to release dopamine, resulting in increased blood pressure and heart rate. Addicts often start using stimulants to increase attention, energy, and alertness.

Synthetic Drugs

Synthetic drugs, also known as designer or club drugs, have been chemically-created in a lab. These drugs include bath salts, flakka, and carfentanil. They are made with man-made chemicals and mimic the effects of drugs, like heroin or cocaine, but they slightly alter the chemical structure.

Examples of these types of drugs are ecstasy, molly, and ketamine. They produce hallucinations and feelings of euphoria. Negative effects include organ damage, seizures, possible violent aggression, suicidal thoughts, even permanent brain damage.

There are many dangerous drugs out there and different types of drug problems. A student may begin using a friend’s Adderall prescription to help them study. Another person may become addicted to opiates after getting a prescription to relieve pain after suffering an injury. Over time, they become addicted. You may think you have control over your drug use, but continued use will certainly become a problem. Addiction takes over quicker than you may think.

Risks of Getting Sober Without Rehab

Rehab can be a bit of a hurdle for someone who has never gone before. The time commitment involved, as well as the financial concerns, lead many people to decide to get sober without actually going to rehab.

 

While this is certainly possible, it can be quite a bit more difficult. One of the things that you’re paying for when you attend rehab is peace of mind, knowledge, and communication with people who specialize in addiction recovery.

 

If you are, however, determined to get sober without going to rehab, there are a few things to consider.

Safety and Health Concerns

The first and foremost thing that you will want to consider is your safety and health. The primary concern is that of withdrawal symptoms.

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Risk Factors for Alcohol Abuse

Alcohol abuse is an all-too-common problem in our society. Alcohol is ubiquitous – it can be purchased at stores across the nation, advertisements for alcohol are displayed everywhere, and the movies portray drinking as something desirable and entertaining.

 

This might lead someone to think that everyone is vulnerable to alcohol addiction – and this is, unfortunately, the case. However, some people are more likely to develop problems with alcohol abuse than others.

 

Understanding the risk factors for alcohol abuse can be one of the best ways to prevent or prepare for potential alcohol problems. In this article, we’ll talk about some of the most common risk factors involved in alcohol abuse.

Common Risk Factors

Many people are in danger of alcohol addiction because of a number of risk factors. Some of the most common risk factors that could lead someone down the road to alcohol addiction include:

 

Family History of Alcoholism

People who have a family history of alcoholism are more likely to experience problems with alcohol abuse. This can be because of the time spent with alcoholic parents, grandparents, or siblings. There is also some evidence that alcoholism can be hereditary, meaning that it may be more likely for someone born to alcoholic parents to become an alcoholic even if the parents no longer drink.

 

Anxiety, Stress, Depression

Many people use alcohol as a form of self-medication. These people are often unaware that they have mental health problems as well as an addiction, or they simply prefer to self-medicate rather than seek help from a doctor.

 

In some cases, these people may reside in an area where there are no medical facilities or doctors. In these situations, alcohol may be one of the only forms of medicine available. This leads us to our next risk factor:

 

Poverty

Many people who live in poor or impoverished areas are more likely to turn to alcohol. People living in poverty often struggle with many problems related to health, education, social security, and safety. These problems can make someone more likely to develop a problem with alcohol.

Environment

An individual’s environment can affect the likelihood of developing an alcohol problem. The environment can heavily influence people at any stage of their lives, not just during childhood.

 

Children who grow up in unhealthy or toxic environments are particularly likely to develop problems with alcohol abuse, as they may develop issues related to trauma. Children who live in houses or neighborhoods where alcoholism is prominent may also be more likely to develop alcohol problems.

Conclusion

Alcohol abuse is a very common problem, and anyone can fall victim to the dangers of alcoholism. Unfortunately, some people are more likely than others to develop problems with alcohol abuse.

 

If you or any of your loved ones or friends meet the criteria for some of these risk factors, it could be a good idea for you to seek help from a rehab facility or from a counselor. These can help you better understand the problem and prepare for any dangers that may be lurking around the corner.

 

Written By Nigel Ford

4 Signs of a Relapse

For people in recovery, relapse is big concern. Relapse can be a step backward, compromising your hard-earned progress. Contrary to popular belief, relapse doesn’t happen abruptly. It creeps up on you in stages, and there are red flags before a person experiences a full-blown relapse.

Recklessness

Engaging in reckless behaviors or decision-making can impact your recovery even if those actions do not directly involve drugs or alcohol. Healthy risk-taking can aid recovery by helping you to move past your comfort zone but impulsive decisions can prove self-destructive, and lead you to pick up alcohol or drugs again.

Negative thoughts and emotions

Persistent feelings of self-pity, sadness, frustration, and isolation can impact your recovery. You may feel deprived during early recovery, but with treatment, you can learn how to cope with difficult emotions and establish healthy thinking patterns. If you notice yourself falling prey to negative thoughts and emotions, they may trigger a relapse.

Neglecting responsibilities

A lack of motivation to fulfill your responsibilities could be another red flag. If you find yourself, or your loved one in recovery, skipping support group meetings or falling out of your routine, seek help right away.

Lying and denial

Right before a relapse, people may tell themselves that a small amount of a substance won’t hurt. This is a dangerous thought for those in recovery. Alternately, the person may be making repeated excuses to cover up certain behaviors. Being honest and sound judgment are critical to a successful recovery.

Seek help if you spot any of the above-mentioned red flags.

 

Signs of Cocaine Addiction

Cocaine is second biggest killer among illegal drugs. However, recognizing the signs of cocaine addiction is not easy. You could look out for these red flags.

Signs of Cocaine Use

The effects of cocaine use start soon after consumption and may last about an hour. Some of these are immediate side effects while others are the result of prolonged use.

  • Physical Signs – Nosebleeds, jaw clenching, muscle twitches, tremors or shakiness, increased body temperature, weight loss
  • Mental / Emotional Signs – Excitability, overconfidence, mood swings, depression, restlessness, paranoia, talkativeness
  • Other signs – Social isolation, risky behaviors, changes in sleeping and eating patterns, poor personal hygiene, financial problems

Since the high from cocaine lasts a relatively short period, users may use several doses. Consuming large quantities can lead to unpredictable and even violent behavior. Such changes in your loved one’s behavior could be signs of a cocaine abuse problem.

Drug Paraphernalia

Apart from the signs mentioned above, there are other indications of cocaine use – drug paraphernalia, such as white powder buildup, syringes, or glass pipes. And some of these items may be hiding in plain sight. For instance, dollar bills in a wallet are normal but rolled up dollar bills in a drawer aren’t. Watch out for –

  • Dollar bills
  • Hollow pens
  • Snuff bullets
  • Small mirrors
  • Lockets and bulky rings
  • Small, re-sealable plastic bags
  • Razor blades
  • Plastic cards

Harmful Effects of Long-Term Cocaine Use

Symptoms of prolonged use include:

  • Loss of smell
  • Trouble swallowing
  • Tooth decay
  • Headaches
  • Loss of appetite
  • Sexual dysfunction
  • Severe depression
  • Seizures
  • Delirium or psychosis
  • Liver and kidney damage
  • Lung damage
  • Heart disease
  • Rare autoimmune diseases
  • Permanent damage to blood vessels

If you suspect a loved one of cocaine use, seek help right away.

 

Is Medical Detox Necessary?

Medical detox is a necessary part of addiction treatment. It is the only way those suffering from addiction problems can return to a normal life without long term inpatient treatment. It is also the most important part of addiction recovery. Medical detox is the first step to recovery and is always supervised by medical professionals. Once medical detox is completed, the patient can begin the rest of the hard work on the road to recovery.

Medical detox is necessary because patients typically enter rehabilitation at a time when their drug use is at an all-time high. With drugs still active in their system, medical detox is necessary before taking any other steps. In many cases, addicts continue to use because the feeling of going through detox seems impossible to deal with. This is where medical professionals come into play. By getting help through medical detox, patients are allowed access to medications that can help lessen the symptoms of detox, and allow the patient to complete the process of detox, before continuing with his or her recovery.

 

Overcoming urge is one of the most challenging parts of addiction recovery. It is also one of the main reasons medical detox is necessary. Many people attempt to detox on their own. However, the unpleasant symptoms of withdrawal typically result in relapse. Having medical professionals who use medications to alleviate those symptoms is key to making it through the first week of detox. These medications act on the brain in the same way drugs and alcohol do. This tricks the brain into allowing the body to detox, without as many unpleasant feelings as withdrawal on its own would normally cause.

After substances are entirely out of a person’s body, he or she is finally ready to begin the journey to recovery. Starting detox in a medical facility allows the patient access to mental health professionals, along with those who are helping with the physical symptoms of addiction. Addiction requires just as much psychological work as it does physical work. In addition to medical detox, counseling and therapy are equally as important in ensuring a successful recovery.

Medical detox allows for a safe withdrawal from drugs and alcohol. Normal withdrawal side effects include nausea, vomiting, shaking, diarrhea, bone or muscle pain, and seizures. In some cases, withdrawal can lead to death. For this reason, it is important to have the help of a medical professional. Surprisingly, alcohol can be one of the worst substances to detox from. The painful and unpleasant side effects of withdrawal often lead the patient to relapse. Fortunately, with the help of a medical team, full detox is possible, which allows the patient to continue on his or her road to recovery. With the physical state playing such a significant role, the mental state of a person addicted to substances is often forgotten about. Ensuring a strong support system of medical professionals, friends, and family is key in the road to recovery. Detoxification can seem like a very daunting process to go through alone. Fortunately, medical aid is available to help patients through the process.

Alcohol Abuse Program

Alcohol abuse is a disease that affects many people throughout the world today. It is a trying situation, not just for the person affected, but also for all the people who care about him or her. Many people who are suffering from alcohol abuse need help in their recovery. The Pacific Bay Recovery Alcohol Abuse Treatment Program in San Diego utilizes a multifaceted approach to helping those afflicted with the disease heal. Each person is unique and requires an individualized approach in order to make treatment effective. While alcohol abuse can make a person or family feel hopeless, it is important to remember there are plenty of treatment options available.

Some people are more susceptible to alcohol abuse due to their genetic makeup. When these people experience stressors, they may have a higher likelihood of turning to alcohol as their coping mechanism. Pacific Bay Recovery aims to not only treat active alcohol abuse, but they also aim to teach patients skills to prevent relapse in the future. This includes everything from learning healthier coping mechanisms to adjusting social influences.

Pacific Bay Recovery takes a holistic approach to alcohol abuse recovery

According to the National Institutes of Health, 15% of Americans have an issue with controlling their alcohol consumption. While alcohol is not a problem when used in moderation, when it gets to the point of taking over a person’s life, there may be a need for outside help. Pacific Bay Recovery’s Inpatient Treatment Center exists to help those suffering from alcohol abuse take back control of their lives.

One of the most difficult parts of alcohol abuse treatment is going through the withdrawal period. This is the reason Pacific Bay Recovery believes inpatient treatment is necessary. By providing inpatient treatment, the patient is able to be managed around the clock during the withdrawal period, and alcohol withdrawal symptoms are less likely to lead to a relapse. Symptoms typically show up 5-10 hours after the last drink and can last up to three days. Once past the withdrawal symptoms, it becomes much easier for the patient to focus on other factors affecting his or her alcohol abuse.

Alcohol abuse is typically the manifestation of a variety of underlying conditions such as, an inability to manage stress, genetic makeup, anxiety and depression, and an overall unhealthy lifestyle. As a result, Pacific Bay Recovery provides patients with mental health addiction counselors to help the patient make overall lifestyle changes in hopes of creating sustained abstinence from alcohol. This can range from creating a healthier sleeping, eating, and exercising schedule to reevaluating personal friendships and relationships that may be unhealthy.

Pacific Bay Recovery provides patients with a full team of advocates composed of a case manager, a doctor, and various mental health specialists in order to create and execute a treatment plan. Patients are expected to complete various chores to help with skills training and rehabilitation. Depending on the patient’s particular needs, he or she may be prescribed various medications to help reduce the desire to drink.

Pacific Bay Recovery takes a holistic approach to alcohol abuse recovery. Every patient is unique, and as a result, an individualized approach must be taken with each patient. The inpatient treatment center allows for a specialized team to create this individualized approach for each patient. Those individuals who are suffering from alcohol abuse and are looking for help should contact Pacific Bay Recovery at (858) 263-9700.

Systematic Withdrawal

Medical detoxification is a systematic process that involves safe withdrawal from drugs or alcohol for individuals who have an addiction. It is also known as Systematic withdrawal.

 

Abuse of harmful substances makes an individual physically dependent on them, which leads to withdrawal symptoms when they attempt to stop abruptly or unplanned. Detoxification systematically removes these toxins while addressing and treating the effects of withdrawal, and it is ideally carried out in a structured environment under a physician’s supervision.

Depending on the substance abused and the setting care, there are different types of Detox methods:

  • Alcohol detoxification
  • Inpatient detoxification
  • Opiate detoxification
  • Outpatient detoxification
  • Psychological withdrawal detoxification

 

Detoxification includes psychotherapeutic treatments to better address the underlying mental health issues that might have predisposed the patient to substance abuse and study the effects of it on the brain. Detox comprises of a structured rehabilitation program that is specific to the substance abused. Patients enroll in life skills classes to learn how to maintain responsibilities and function in a healthy manner as they recover. They participate in family and personal therapy sessions. Routine visits are scheduled for medical care to prevent self-medicating. An action plan is also created for relapse prevention.

Withdrawal syndrome is a collection of signs and symptoms that occur once the use of a drug is reduced or stopped

Withdrawal syndrome is a collection of signs and symptoms that occur once the use of a drug is reduced or stopped. The nature, severity, duration, and variety of withdrawal symptoms vary with the type of drug.

Heroin withdrawal presents with restlessness, musculoskeletal pain, insomnia, diarrhea, vomiting, etc.

Mental symptoms include irrational mood swings, anger, hallucinations. Physical symptoms usually disappear by the time detoxification process is complete, but the mental symptoms may last longer.

Medical supervision is recommended for the majority of addicts as they undergo systematic withdrawal, primarily to ensure adherence and prevent a relapse. Very few will succeed at detoxification without any type of supervision, and these are typically patients who were abusing for a very short time. Detox can be life-threatening in case of a hard drug addiction causing severe withdrawal symptoms. Some patients will experience liver failure, heart palpitations, or even brain aneurysms. Therefore, it is critical for a trained and experienced medical professional to carefully monitor your withdrawal and manage it meticulously.

It is highly recommended that you enter treatment immediately after detoxing is complete. There are resources available to help you transition to treatment facilities. Many times, inpatient drug and alcohol treatment centers incorporate an initial period of structured detox into their program, so there is a more seamless transition from detox to follow-up treatment.
Some of these treatment options include inpatient residential treatment, outpatient treatment, individual counseling, group counseling, support groups, and especially for those recovering from alcoholism, 12-Step programs, and sober living houses. Medical detox is a comprehensive program for the effective treatment of patients suffering from various kinds of substance abuse and chances of a full recovery and return to normalcy are high if carefully managed.

What Type of Anti-Craving Medications are used for Alcohol Addiction?

Why would anyone want to tiptoe through life, as if it’s a full-fledged cocktail blur?  Getting drunk daily, probably doesn’t sound so appealing to those of us that are not alcoholics. Neither does waking up craving the next liquid courage binge or nightly sweats due to our shallow veins that need to seep with alcohol.

According to the National Council on Drug and Alcohol Abuse, alcohol is the most commonly used addictive substance in the United States: 17.6 million people, or one in every twelve adults, suffer from alcohol abuse or dependence along with several million more who engage in risky, binge drinking patterns that could lead to alcohol problems.

The brains of alcoholics are wired differently, forcing them to have a chemical imbalance, where they crave dependence.  The pleasure can be corrected with certain anti-craving medications but would have to be taken over extended periods of time.

For any specific, powerful solutions in subsiding the desire for alcohol, you MUST admit you have a problem and need help.  Step One is recognizing unhealthy patterns and verbally expressing, you know there is dependence and you are powerless over alcohol and life has become unmanageable.

What can we do about the cravings, to cease taking the first drink?

The FDA has approved pharmaceuticals such as Naltrexone, Antabuse, Acamprosate, and antidepressants (SSRIs) tend to be the most effective.   

Naltrexone – stops you from your dependence on opiate drugs and alcohol.  It has been designed to block the feeling of being “high” that you get when you drink.  This should be combined with rehab and a certified counselor that will help maintain sobriety.

Antabuse – one of the oldest and most commonly used remedies that intercept with alcohol metabolism, thus producing negative side effects when alcohol is consumed, such as vomiting and painful nausea.  The problem occurs when individuals stop taking the medication because they want to drink instead of getting better.

SSRIs – are used for treating depression and balancing serotonin levels.  Alcohol is a depressant, many isolate while abusing alcohol and become hermits, putting them in a state of hibernation.  Who wouldn’t feel depressed while in this state?

Acamprosate – used in the treatment of alcohol dependence, to maintain self-restraint. It has a good success rate for subsiding cravings.

There are all-natural remedies like acupuncture that has been shown to be a highly effective form of treatment (traditionally used in Chinese medicine).

Milk thistle is richly made up of a concentrated antioxidant silymarin that aids in restoring liver functioning and further damage to your liver.

Alcohol depletes our vitamins, nutrients, and minerals – which means we should increase our B Vitamins for energy production. Glutathione becomes depleted in the body from excessive alcohol use and drinking suppresses our appetites – therefore, we consume fewer food products and our bodies lack necessary nutrients.

It is imperative to eat a diet full of antioxidants and take a glutathione supplement to stabilize levels in your body.

We want you to give up alcohol permanently and stop your cravings before they start.  This requires you to recognize what is triggering you reaching for a drink in the first place.

Visit us here https://www.pacificbayrecovery.com/ for additional information on how we can help.

Take the first step with us today and learn how to live alcohol-free and vibrant.