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Alcohol Detox

Is Medical Detox Necessary?

Medical detox is a necessary part of addiction treatment. It is the only way those suffering from addiction problems can return to a normal life without long term inpatient treatment. It is also the most important part of addiction recovery. Medical detox is the first step to recovery and is always supervised by medical professionals. Once medical detox is completed, the patient can begin the rest of the hard work on the road to recovery.

Medical detox is necessary because patients typically enter rehabilitation at a time when their drug use is at an all-time high. With drugs still active in their system, medical detox is necessary before taking any other steps. In many cases, addicts continue to use because the feeling of going through detox seems impossible to deal with. This is where medical professionals come into play. By getting help through medical detox, patients are allowed access to medications that can help lessen the symptoms of detox, and allow the patient to complete the process of detox, before continuing with his or her recovery.

Medical detox allows for a safe withdrawal from drugs and alcohol

Overcoming urge is one of the most challenging parts of addiction recovery. It is also one of the main reasons medical detox is necessary. Many people attempt to detox on their own. However, the unpleasant symptoms of withdrawal typically result in relapse. Having medical professionals who use medications to alleviate those symptoms is key to making it through the first week of detox. These medications act on the brain in the same way drugs and alcohol do. This tricks the brain into allowing the body to detox, without as many unpleasant feelings as withdrawal on its own would normally cause.

After substances are entirely out of a person’s body, he or she is finally ready to begin the journey to recovery. Starting detox in a medical facility allows the patient access to mental health professionals, along with those who are helping with the physical symptoms of addiction. Addiction requires just as much psychological work as it does physical work. In addition to medical detox, counseling and therapy are equally as important in ensuring a successful recovery.

Medical detox allows for a safe withdrawal from drugs and alcohol. Normal withdrawal side effects include nausea, vomiting, shaking, diarrhea, bone or muscle pain, and seizures. In some cases, withdrawal can lead to death. For this reason, it is important to have the help of a medical professional. Surprisingly, alcohol can be one of the worst substances to detox from. The painful and unpleasant side effects of withdrawal often lead the patient to relapse. Fortunately, with the help of a medical team, full detox is possible, which allows the patient to continue on his or her road to recovery. With the physical state playing such a significant role, the mental state of a person addicted to substances is often forgotten about. Ensuring a strong support system of medical professionals, friends, and family is key in the road to recovery. Detoxification can seem like a very daunting process to go through alone. Fortunately, medical aid is available to help patients through the process.

Alcohol Abuse Program

Alcohol abuse is a disease that affects many people throughout the world today. It is a trying situation, not just for the person affected, but also for all the people who care about him or her. Many people who are suffering from alcohol abuse need help in their recovery. The Pacific Bay Recovery Alcohol Abuse Treatment Program in San Diego utilizes a multifaceted approach to helping those afflicted with the disease heal. Each person is unique and requires an individualized approach in order to make treatment effective. While alcohol abuse can make a person or family feel hopeless, it is important to remember there are plenty of treatment options available.

Some people are more susceptible to alcohol abuse due to their genetic makeup. When these people experience stressors, they may have a higher likelihood of turning to alcohol as their coping mechanism. Pacific Bay Recovery aims to not only treat active alcohol abuse, but they also aim to teach patients skills to prevent relapse in the future. This includes everything from learning healthier coping mechanisms to adjusting social influences.

Pacific Bay Recovery takes a holistic approach to alcohol abuse recovery

According to the National Institutes of Health, 15% of Americans have an issue with controlling their alcohol consumption. While alcohol is not a problem when used in moderation, when it gets to the point of taking over a person’s life, there may be a need for outside help. Pacific Bay Recovery’s Inpatient Treatment Center exists to help those suffering from alcohol abuse take back control of their lives.

One of the most difficult parts of alcohol abuse treatment is going through the withdrawal period. This is the reason Pacific Bay Recovery believes inpatient treatment is necessary. By providing inpatient treatment, the patient is able to be managed around the clock during the withdrawal period, and alcohol withdrawal symptoms are less likely to lead to a relapse. Symptoms typically show up 5-10 hours after the last drink and can last up to three days. Once past the withdrawal symptoms, it becomes much easier for the patient to focus on other factors affecting his or her alcohol abuse.

Alcohol abuse is typically the manifestation of a variety of underlying conditions such as, an inability to manage stress, genetic makeup, anxiety and depression, and an overall unhealthy lifestyle. As a result, Pacific Bay Recovery provides patients with mental health addiction counselors to help the patient make overall lifestyle changes in hopes of creating sustained abstinence from alcohol. This can range from creating a healthier sleeping, eating, and exercising schedule to reevaluating personal friendships and relationships that may be unhealthy.

Pacific Bay Recovery provides patients with a full team of advocates composed of a case manager, a doctor, and various mental health specialists in order to create and execute a treatment plan. Patients are expected to complete various chores to help with skills training and rehabilitation. Depending on the patient’s particular needs, he or she may be prescribed various medications to help reduce the desire to drink.

Pacific Bay Recovery takes a holistic approach to alcohol abuse recovery. Every patient is unique, and as a result, an individualized approach must be taken with each patient. The inpatient treatment center allows for a specialized team to create this individualized approach for each patient. Those individuals who are suffering from alcohol abuse and are looking for help should contact Pacific Bay Recovery at (858) 263-9700.

Systematic Withdrawal

Medical detoxification is a systematic process that involves safe withdrawal from drugs or alcohol for individuals who have an addiction. It is also known as Systematic withdrawal.

 

Abuse of harmful substances makes an individual physically dependent on them, which leads to withdrawal symptoms when they attempt to stop abruptly or unplanned. Detoxification systematically removes these toxins while addressing and treating the effects of withdrawal, and it is ideally carried out in a structured environment under a physician’s supervision.

Depending on the substance abused and the setting care, there are different types of Detox methods:

  • Alcohol detoxification
  • Inpatient detoxification
  • Opiate detoxification
  • Outpatient detoxification
  • Psychological withdrawal detoxification

 

Detoxification includes psychotherapeutic treatments to better address the underlying mental health issues that might have predisposed the patient to substance abuse and study the effects of it on the brain. Detox comprises of a structured rehabilitation program that is specific to the substance abused. Patients enroll in life skills classes to learn how to maintain responsibilities and function in a healthy manner as they recover. They participate in family and personal therapy sessions. Routine visits are scheduled for medical care to prevent self-medicating. An action plan is also created for relapse prevention.

Withdrawal syndrome is a collection of signs and symptoms that occur once the use of a drug is reduced or stopped

Withdrawal syndrome is a collection of signs and symptoms that occur once the use of a drug is reduced or stopped. The nature, severity, duration, and variety of withdrawal symptoms vary with the type of drug.

Heroin withdrawal presents with restlessness, musculoskeletal pain, insomnia, diarrhea, vomiting, etc.

Mental symptoms include irrational mood swings, anger, hallucinations. Physical symptoms usually disappear by the time detoxification process is complete, but the mental symptoms may last longer.

Medical supervision is recommended for the majority of addicts as they undergo systematic withdrawal, primarily to ensure adherence and prevent a relapse. Very few will succeed at detoxification without any type of supervision, and these are typically patients who were abusing for a very short time. Detox can be life-threatening in case of a hard drug addiction causing severe withdrawal symptoms. Some patients will experience liver failure, heart palpitations, or even brain aneurysms. Therefore, it is critical for a trained and experienced medical professional to carefully monitor your withdrawal and manage it meticulously.

It is highly recommended that you enter treatment immediately after detoxing is complete. There are resources available to help you transition to treatment facilities. Many times, inpatient drug and alcohol treatment centers incorporate an initial period of structured detox into their program, so there is a more seamless transition from detox to follow-up treatment.
Some of these treatment options include inpatient residential treatment, outpatient treatment, individual counseling, group counseling, support groups, and especially for those recovering from alcoholism, 12-Step programs, and sober living houses. Medical detox is a comprehensive program for the effective treatment of patients suffering from various kinds of substance abuse and chances of a full recovery and return to normalcy are high if carefully managed.

What Type of Anti-Craving Medications are used for Alcohol Addiction?

Why would anyone want to tiptoe through life, as if it’s a full-fledged cocktail blur?  Getting drunk daily, probably doesn’t sound so appealing to those of us that are not alcoholics. Neither does waking up craving the next liquid courage binge or nightly sweats due to our shallow veins that need to seep with alcohol.

According to the National Council on Drug and Alcohol Abuse, alcohol is the most commonly used addictive substance in the United States: 17.6 million people, or one in every twelve adults, suffer from alcohol abuse or dependence along with several million more who engage in risky, binge drinking patterns that could lead to alcohol problems.

The brains of alcoholics are wired differently, forcing them to have a chemical imbalance, where they crave dependence.  The pleasure can be corrected with certain anti-craving medications but would have to be taken over extended periods of time.

For any specific, powerful solutions in subsiding the desire for alcohol, you MUST admit you have a problem and need help.  Step One is recognizing unhealthy patterns and verbally expressing, you know there is dependence and you are powerless over alcohol and life has become unmanageable.

What can we do about the cravings, to cease taking the first drink?

The FDA has approved pharmaceuticals such as Naltrexone, Antabuse, Acamprosate, and antidepressants (SSRIs) tend to be the most effective.   

Naltrexone – stops you from your dependence on opiate drugs and alcohol.  It has been designed to block the feeling of being “high” that you get when you drink.  This should be combined with rehab and a certified counselor that will help maintain sobriety.

Antabuse – one of the oldest and most commonly used remedies that intercept with alcohol metabolism, thus producing negative side effects when alcohol is consumed, such as vomiting and painful nausea.  The problem occurs when individuals stop taking the medication because they want to drink instead of getting better.

SSRIs – are used for treating depression and balancing serotonin levels.  Alcohol is a depressant, many isolate while abusing alcohol and become hermits, putting them in a state of hibernation.  Who wouldn’t feel depressed while in this state?

Acamprosate – used in the treatment of alcohol dependence, to maintain self-restraint. It has a good success rate for subsiding cravings.

There are all-natural remedies like acupuncture that has been shown to be a highly effective form of treatment (traditionally used in Chinese medicine).

Milk thistle is richly made up of a concentrated antioxidant silymarin that aids in restoring liver functioning and further damage to your liver.

Alcohol depletes our vitamins, nutrients, and minerals – which means we should increase our B Vitamins for energy production. Glutathione becomes depleted in the body from excessive alcohol use and drinking suppresses our appetites – therefore, we consume fewer food products and our bodies lack necessary nutrients.

It is imperative to eat a diet full of antioxidants and take a glutathione supplement to stabilize levels in your body.

We want you to give up alcohol permanently and stop your cravings before they start.  This requires you to recognize what is triggering you reaching for a drink in the first place.

Visit us here https://www.pacificbayrecovery.com/ for additional information on how we can help.

Take the first step with us today and learn how to live alcohol-free and vibrant.

Alcohol Dependence VS Alcohol Abuse – What is the Difference?

Late nights partying at the club – is ok, every now and again.  Going to the occasional dinner gathering or holiday event, where alcohol is overconsumed, perfectly fine.  Binging daily or making it a continuous habit, not so cool.  This type of dangerous behavior could possibly turn deadly.  Alcohol is cunning, baffling and powerful and it is out to destroy.  It does not discriminate, care what your socioeconomic status is, the size of your family or chosen profession.

Let’s define what alcohol dependence VS alcohol abuse is:

Being dependent on an alcoholic drink, both psychologically and physically.  According to the DSM – 5, in 2013, it was reclassified as alcoholism

Once you take the first drink, you cannot stop.  You are unable to put your drink down and you are powerless over the magical liquid. You are drinking to get drunk, every single day.

Alcoholism has you telling yourself you will quit soon, but you are unable to.  For example, you mark days off on the calendar of when you will give up, the day arrives, and you cannot fathom life without a drink.

Your family and close friends notice your behavior is erratic and your life is unmanageable.

Individuals who regularly are dependent on alcohol have consciously chose to pattern themselves in disengaging full responsibility in all areas of their lives.

Often, we will see dependents significantly increase the amount of alcohol they purchase and drink, they will drink for extended periods of time and behaviors are unpredictable.

According to Alcoholics Anonymous, you might be classified as an alcoholic if you can honestly answer YES to at least four or five of the following questions http://www.aa.org/pages/en_US/is-aa-for-you-twelve-questions-only-you-can-answer.

Alcoholism:  the disease that makes you too selfish to see the havoc you created and care about the people you shattered. quotesgram.com

Alcohol abuse is commonly referred to as consuming way too much, too frequently.  You are off to the races, but you can stop after ten, even if you do not pass out.  You probably bask in the euphoria of drinking 4-5, nightly, most days of the week.

Alcohol is probably the easiest substance to abuse because the potential is there.  It’s legal, and it’s available. – Lance Penny, QuoteHD.com

Alcohol not only destroys us, it hurts people we lovingly care about, in the grueling process.  Sometimes an intervention is necessary when an alcoholic has hit rock bottom.  Our team at Pacific Bay Recovery standby to assist you and your family.

Trained, compassionate and successful healthcare experts want to guide you on your path to recovery.  You are welcome to visit our website for additional information and to ask questions https://www.pacificbayrecovery.com/.

We encourage you to seek treatment with the help of caring specialists.  Our facility is different than any other rehab center because you are not just a number with us.  Each person that checks in to our treatment center is designed a special protocol, tailored to your individual recovery needs!

Remember, one day at a time and do not quit five minutes before your miracle.  We want you to live a life of optimal wellness but that means you will face difficult challenges and you must learn to never give up!

Alcohol Dependence vs Abuse: When is drinking too much and when is drinking an addiction?

Maybe you had a crazy night out with friends, fueled by many alcoholic drinks. Maybe you attended a party and consumed so much alcohol you don’t remember anything. If something like this happens more than once, is it a problem? Does drinking like this lead to addiction? What is alcohol dependence versus alcohol abuse?

 

Searching for answers to these questions or reaching out for support should never be discouraged. Pacific Bay Recovery Drug Treatment Center can help, www.pacificbayrecovery.com. Thanks to significant advances, there are a variety of treatment methods, and Pacific Bay Recovery Treatment Center can create a plan to treat both the body and the mind.

 

How Much Can You Drink?

Many adults drink moderately, without complications. Recent research even touts modest health benefits from alcohol consumption. For women, low-risk drinking is defined as no more than three drinks a day, not to exceed more than seven drinks per week. For men, it is no more than four drinks a day, with no more than 14 drinks per week.

An estimated 16.6 million Americans have Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD

When is Drinking Dependence or Abuse?

An estimated 16.6 million Americans have Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD), which includes a range of mild, moderate and severe alcohol problems. AUD is identified by compulsive alcohol use, loss of control over drinking alcohol, and a negative emotional state when not drinking.

According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) There are several questions to ask to determine when to seek help:

 

  • Experienced drinking more or for extended periods of time than intended?
  • Tried to stop drinking or cut down, without success?
  • Experienced a strong need to drink?
  • Spent a great deal of time seeking relief from the aftereffects?
  • Has drinking, or becoming sick from drinking, interfered with taking care of home or family, or caused job or school problems?
  • Continued to drink even though it caused trouble with family or friends?
  • Skipped activities, or reduced participation in things important to you or that gave you pleasure, to drink?
  • Experienced unsafe situations more than once while or after drinking (such as driving, swimming, using machinery, walking in dangerous areas, or having unsafe sex)?
  • Increased drinking to achieve desired effects or found the usual number of drinks less effective than before?
  • Continued to drink even when depressed or anxious, or adding to another health problem or after experiencing a memory blackout?
  • When the effects of alcohol wear off, experienced withdrawal symptoms, such as trouble sleeping, shakiness, irritability, anxiety, depression, restlessness, nausea, or sweating, or even sensed things that were not there?

If you have any of these symptoms, this may be a cause for concern. The more symptoms you experience, the more urgent the need is to change.

A health professional at Pacific Bay Recovery Drug Treatment Center,  www.pacificbayrecovery.com, can provide a formal assessment of your symptoms. Ultimately, receiving treatment improves chances of success and provides a better path to enjoy life.

Sources:

https://www.niaaa.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/niaaa-recognizes-alcohol-awareness-month-2015

https://www.niaaa.nih.gov/alcohol-health/overview-alcohol-consumption/alcohol-use-disorders

Systematic and Medically Supervised Withdrawal from a Drug

Medically supervised withdrawal from a drug, also referred to as detoxification, is the first step in substance abuse treatment programs and it involves the removal of these toxic products from the bloodstream.

An indicator of addiction to a substance is the onset of withdrawal symptoms when trying to remove the drugs from the body. These can range from mild to severe in nature, and there are situations which can be life-threatening depending on the drug used as well as the level of dependency and the method of intake.

Withdrawal symptoms can be both psychological and physical and abruptly stopping the offending drug is usually not suggested. Therefore, medically assisted detoxification is recommended to prevent patients experiencing unwanted withdrawal effects.

assisted or Supervised Withdrawal

Medically Assisted Withdrawal

Medically assisted detoxification is accomplished in a controlled facility which is supervised by healthcare professionals 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Some patients may need to be weaned down from the drugs they are using in order to slowly get the product in their system down to nothing, and others may require being prescribed other medications in order to manage withdrawal symptoms and cravings.

The patients most likely to require medically assisted withdrawal include those who are addicted to drugs such as:

  • Prescription opioids
  • Heroin
  • Alcohol
  • Benzodiazepines

Prescription Opioids and Heroin

Prescription opioid addiction is a public health emergency currently in the United States with over 40 Americans dying from opioid overdoses every day in the country. In 2012 alone, over 2 million Americans over the age of 12 were addicted to these medications and another near 500,000 people were addicted to heroin. Heroin is also an opioid but an illegal one.

Opioid addiction needs to be managed medically since withdrawing from these drugs causes uncomfortable symptoms and signs such as:

  • Excessive sweating with intermittent chills
  • Nausea and/or vomiting
  • Generalized muscle aches and pains
  • Restlessness
  • Agitation
  • Sleeping disturbances
  • Depression
  • Irritability
  • Anxiety

Patients addicted to prescription opioids are usually managed by gradually reducing the dose of the drug until it has worked out completely from their bodies. Heroin is managed differently in that methadone is dispensed to these patients to take over the effects caused by the drug. The methadone is then gradually tapered down until it can be stopped.

Medications such as buprenorphine and buprenorphine combined with naloxone are also used to help treat opioid addiction and dependency.

Alcohol

Suddenly stopping the intake of alcohol in someone who has a severe dependency on this product can be life-threatening.

A condition known as delirium tremens (DT) can develop as a result of alcohol withdrawal and may present with the following symptoms and signs:

  • Agitation
  • Fevers
  • Confusion
  • Hallucinations
  • Seizures

In order to avoid these severe conditions, medically assisted withdrawal from alcohol is often necessary and entails the use of medications such as benzodiazepines. Mineral and vitamin supplementation may also be prescribed to replace those lost as a result of excessive alcohol use.

Benzodiazepines

These drugs do have their place in treating anxiety and sleep disorders but there are patients who become dependent on them and need help to remove them from their system.

Benzodiazepine withdrawal is performed in a similar fashion to that of opioid withdrawal in that the dosage of the medication is tapered down until it is completely metabolized by the body and completely removed from the patient’s bloodstream.

Patients addicted to short-acting benzodiazepines are prescribed longer-acting ones during medically managed withdrawal in order to reduce the chance of potential side effects.

How to Detox Your Liver From Alcohol Without 30 Day Rehab Programs

Detox Your Liver From AlcoholIn the past few years, more and more scrutiny has been placed on America’s addiction to short rehab programmes. Countless articles have why the current 30-day trend is outdated, expensive and has poor rates of return. Some estimate that only 10% of addicts going into a 30-day rehab programme will stay sober.  In an interview with Slate magazine, one Outpatient clinic owner noted: “You don’t treat a chronic illness with 30 days of intensive rehab – that’s absurd”. He’s got a point. The real question is what’s the solution? Luckily there are other options on how to detox your liver from alcohol.

 

Symptoms of Detox

Detox can be a painful process. Not only are symptoms of withdrawal severe and often very unpleasant, chronic alcohol abuse and addiction is a long built habit that takes time, effort and a certain amount of skill to break. The most obvious negative to alcohol detox is the withdrawal symptoms. Patients get a number of symptoms including:

  • Irritability
  • Anxiety
  • Nightmares
  • Fatigue
  • Sweating
  • Shaking
  • Hallucinations
  • Confusions
  • Seizures
  • Death

That final one is the biggest takeaway. Detox can be dangerous. In some ways, the 30-day alcohol detox rehab programme made sense when it was first invented. Get the addict safely off alcohol without some of the more severe side effects and back to their family sober. But the more we learn about addiction the more we learn this just doesn’t work. Here’s why:

  • Addiction isn’t just withdrawal. Whilst addicts don’t want to stop because they fear the withdrawal – this isn’t the only reason they are addicted.
  • Old habits die hard. How long does it take to make or break a habit? If you took up a new hobby would 30 days of doing that hobby count as a new habit? No. People take much longer, up to 90 days to make habits.
  • Addiction takes time to open up to. Often 30 days isn’t long enough to build trusting therapeutic relationships with the staff at these clinics
  • The addicts don’t want to be there. It’s no surprise that family members and loved ones want alcoholics to seek help. But often convincing them to go to a 30-day programme won’t be enough. They have to make a long-term commitment to change and signing up to 30 days isn’t a big enough commitment. Longer treatments take dedication and real willpower – the exact characteristics an alcoholic needs to overcome their addiction.

 

Unrealistic Expectations – Outpatient or Longer Stays are the Only Way

As we’ve seen – 30-day alcohol detox programs aren’t working. The success rates are low, sometimes lower than 10% completing and continuing the programme. There are, however, a number of solutions. One alternative is longer residential programmes. Those deeply ingrained habits, that have years and years of history are far more likely to be broken by much longer stays, perhaps 3 or more months. Many recovery practices do offer this service and it typically has a much higher rate of success (up to 2 or 3X higher than the best 30-day programmes). Another option is outpatient recovery, with skilled doctors prescribing the best medications to guide a person through the process and stop dangerous withdrawal. In fact, studies have shown for all substance abuse, including alcohol, that longer stays in rehab simply work better.

 

 

Learning New Habits in Quitting Alcohol and Drugs

Let’s face it, quitting alcohol and drugs, is very hard or everyone would be doing it. To kick a habit, a person goes through withdrawals, suffers depression, and has severe mood changes. What you do during these times is critical to your health and recovery. Knowing the habits that caused addiction will help, and learning new healthy habits is the best way to say goodbye to drugs and/or alcohol for good.

Quitting Alcohol and DrugsJournaling

Some people keep a diary of how they are feeling with times and dates when the worst urges come and go so they can track their behavior and find other things to do during these difficult times. This is called journaling. Some activities that become new habits include taking walks, riding bikes, or even swimming down at you favorite swimming hole. Whatever you do, you must not fall prey to the urges and fall back into the pitfall that is drugs and alcohol, such as pouring a drink to calm yourself instead take that walk in the fresh air until the urge subsides. Instead, take a long bike ride with your kids and have some fun exploring the neighborhood again.

Journaling is a way to discover what works and what doesn’t, how long it took before your urge left your mind, and what makes you go back to your happy place. Everyone must find out what works for them, as each addict has unique triggers and habits. By not giving up and experimenting with other options, rather than drugs and alcohol, you will be on your way to staying drug- and alcohol-free.

intensive outpatient treatment Make a List of Reasons to Quit

Another way of learning new habits is making a list for yourself of reasons you are quitting drugs and alcohol. Make goals for yourself that you can accomplish and place this list somewhere you can see it, such in your wallet or on your nightstand to view when you wake up in the first thing that morning. When you get those urges to use drugs and/or alcohol, read the list and give your mind the positive reasons you are doing this and exchange the bad habits with good ones. Experts advise us that it takes the mind 21 days of repetitive positive change before it becomes a new habit. Don’t worry, those urges will fade with time, and you will be one step closer to your goals.

Celebrate Recovery

Remember to celebrate your daily recovery, as there will be good days as well as the bad ones. There are going to be days when life is good, and there will be those days when everything reminds you of your old habits. This is perfectly normal as, of course, we are all only human. You must realize both types of days are quite dangerous, so don’t get overly confident that you have the beast under control. Always know addiction is deep inside of you waiting for a reason to jump out and take back control over you. Understanding that you are a recovering addict for life and living each day away from you drug or alcohol addictions brings you closer to a full and productive recovery.

Facts on Alcohol and Drug Detox from a San Diego Addiction Center

Many people go through detoxification (detox), whether it is related to alcohol or drugs. It is a fact you can die from alcohol detox, due to the lack of the alcohol chemical the body has been used to for some time. Going through this alcohol detox, canstockphoto43350234around 5 percent of all heavy alcoholics will die. This is significant number, especially considering that 2.5 million alcoholics seek substance abuse treatment each year in America alone.

Drug detox some great findings would be 70 percent is the highest among patients discharged from hospital residential treatment center, detox at 67% and short term residential treatments follows at 59%.  The treatment competition rates were much lower in long term and or less structured settings at 44% and outpatient came in at 40%.

     Differences between Alcohol and Drug Detox

With these statistics in mind, we need to now look at the difference between alcohol and drug detoxification. The two processes are similar but different in the actual way they are conducted by centers. Both can be done at a residential facility where the patient is detoxed in a few days and under medical supervision.

In some cases, detox is done with medical prescription drugs to help with the withdrawal symptoms. These withdrawal symptoms include seizures, headaches, physical shakes, depression, emotional mood swings, outbursts, fatigue, and a heart attack. The differences with the detox between alcohol and drugs would involve the approach of the treatments, as well as the method used by the counselor who gives you therapy and counseling. 

Drug Detox San DiegoThe cravings and triggers for drugs and alcohol are different, so the therapy and coping skills are taught and presented differently to the individuals and to the groups. Drug detox will get rid of all the toxins in your body that accumulate from the drugs. This helps your body adjust slowly back to normal. Detox will also get rid of the alcohol toxins, as well, but you have to be aware that by medically detoxing doesn’t come without side effects. Some individuals who take methadone and Suboxone never stop taking the drug, or they completely relapse to their drug of choice. So, choosing the right treatment and center is crucial to your success.

Holistic Detox Approach

Some success in drug and alcohol abuse has been seen by centers taking a holistic approach to detoxification. These facilities use programs that exercise regiments, nutritional programs, and saunas, as sweating the toxins from the body naturally freeing the toxins from the body. After completing the holistic approach to detox, many patients report that they have reduced cravings for drugs. They feel happier, are more alert, and think clearer, giving them a stronger will to continue the next steps in the rehab program and getting on their way to a happier healthier drug free life without addiction.

Pacific Bay Recovery offers exceptional drug and alcohol detox programs along with rehab programs that are effective and long lasting. Call us today to find out about the best addiction treatment center in San Diego!

Resources

DrugsRehabs.info  (2014). Alcohol Information and detox facts and myths. Retrieved from: http:www.drugrehabs.info/alcohol-info-and-resources/alcohol-      detox-facts-and-myths/

SAMHSA (2014). A Life in the community for everyone . Retrieved from: http:www.samhsa.gov/samhsanewletter/Volume_17_Number_4/TreatmentDischarges.aspx