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Behavioral Rehab

What Are Psychological Withdrawal Symptoms?

When people discuss drug and alcohol withdrawal, they generally focus on physical symptoms. While the physical symptoms are certainly more apparent, the psychological withdrawal symptoms are often those that lead people towards a relapse.

 

In this article, we’re going to talk about the psychological component of withdrawal. If you or a loved one are going to be struggling with withdrawal in the near future, don’t hesitate to get a hold of a San Diego drug rehab center to help you with your treatment.

 

What Is Withdrawal?

 

Withdrawal is the term used to describe a collection of symptoms that occur when someone suddenly stops using drugs. Withdrawal symptoms generally only happen when someone is physically dependent on a drug, though sometimes people may experience solely psychological withdrawal.

In the case of physical addiction, withdrawal occurs because the body has become accustomed to being fuelled with drugs. It then stops producing its own hormones, neurotransmitters, and chemicals. When the addict stops using drugs, the body then falls into a deficit which leads to physical and mental turmoil.

 

However, some people may still undergo some degree of psychological withdrawal even if they’re not physically addicted. These people often have a psychological dependence: they believe that they need a drug or alcohol to function, even though this might not be the case.

 

Nonetheless, this self-imposed belief tends to lead to psychological withdrawal symptoms if they’re unable to get their fix. This also tends to occur in behavioural addictions that don’t involve the consumption of drugs or alcohol.

 

Psychological Withdrawal Symptoms

 

Psychological withdrawal symptoms can vary in severity. They can be mild, moderate, or quite debilitating depending on the intensity of the addiction. These are some of the most common psychological withdrawal symptoms.

 

  • Anxiety
  • Social withdrawal
  • Emotional instability, depression
  • Irritability, anger, emotional outbursts
  • Self-doubt and self-confidence issues
  • Delusions
  • Negative belief patterns preventing one from achieving their goals
  • Anhedonia (being unable to find pleasure in activities)
  • Difficulty thinking or processing situations, trouble concentrating
  • Inability to perform at cognitive tasks
  • Memory problems
  • Intense cravings, thoughts about drugs or alcohol

 

As you can see, these problems can be very difficult.

 

Managing Psychological Withdrawal Symptoms

 

Psychological withdrawal symptoms can be uncomfortable to manage. However, there are some things that you can do.

 

In many cases, psychological withdrawal symptoms are actually indicating an underlying problem. Many people harbor anxieties or insecurities before trying to cover them up with drugs. When they enter withdrawal, they no longer have the drug to cover up their emotional problems. This resurgence makes the problems more prominent than ever.

 

Seeking San Diego drug and alcohol rehab can provide you with the therapy that you need to overcome these psychological issues.

 

Conclusion

 

While physical withdrawal is most often discussed, psychological withdrawal symptoms are still no joke. Learning how to overcome psychological withdrawal symptoms is important for anyone who is going to stop using drugs.

 

 

Written by Nigel Ford

 

Goals of Addiction Treatment

Addiction treatment is complex. This is because substance abuse and addiction disrupt almost all aspects of an individual’s life.

Addiction treatment helps individuals to stop using, cultivate an addiction-free lifestyle, and achieve a productive life once they leave rehab.

Substance abuse treatment goals or addiction treatment goals are goals that the recovering individual works toward achieving. These goals must be specific and meaningful to the individual so that they can help them maintain sobriety. (more…)

Peer Pressure and Addiction

Peer pressure comes in many forms. It is most widely acknowledged for being a pervasive force during school years; however, peer pressure can affect people of all ages.

Peer pressure is any sort of influence that pressures someone to act a certain way. Peer pressure can be direct or indirect, but the result is often the same: it results in someone changing their behavior to match that of their peer group.

Unfortunately, many people succumb to addiction as a result of peer pressure. In this article, we’re going to talk about how peer pressure can lead to addiction. (more…)

The Importance of Healthy Relationships for Preventing Addiction

One of the most important things that can help a person avoid addiction is having healthy relationships with the people in their lives. This is particularly true during childhood. Maintaining healthy relationships with family members, friends, and even school teachers can be instrumental in helping to prevent addiction.

In this article, we’ll explain exactly why relationships are so important for helping to prevent addictions. If you are struggling with addiction, or if you’re in the care of a loved one, make sure that healthy relationships are a priority in your life.

What Makes Relationships So Important?

A person learns a tremendous amount through the relationships that they share with others. People often tend to learn about themselves the most through relationships. If one is observant, they can make careful observations about themselves based on the relationships that they hold with other people.

Relationships are even more important for children and youth, though they may not be as aware of the implications of healthy relationships. For the younger generations, relationships are generally important because they can help people develop a healthy sense of self. In the long-term, this can help prevent the development of mental health problems like anxiety.

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Drug Abuse and Trauma

Drug abuse and trauma often go hand-in-hand. Many drug users are the victims of trauma already, and yet the addictions that they are likely to fall into may cause even more trauma. This is part of the vicious cycle of drug addiction, and one of the most difficult barriers on the road to recovery.

In this article, we’ll talk about how drug abuse and trauma are linked together and how understanding these issues can make someone more likely to overcome their addictions.

How Trauma Can Lead to Addiction

One of the main leading causes of addiction is trauma.

Trauma is an emotional issue that arises when a person has to go through an intense experience that they are unable to mentally cope with. Since the mind is incapable of coping with the experience, it is internalized in the body in the form of trauma.

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Triggers that Can Cause Drug Cravings

One of the biggest problems that recovering drug addicts must deal with is a relapse. The rates of relapse are incredibly high, even among people who have successfully gone through rehab. One of the reasons for this is because people may not properly learn how to deal with their drug cravings and the triggers that lead up to them.

 

A trigger can be a person, place, situation, or thing that causes an individual to crave drugs. Drug cravings can be dealt with in a number of ways, but one of the best ways to deal with them is a preventative measure: be aware of your triggers, and learn how to deal with or avoid these triggers so that the cravings don’t come in the first place.

 

This article will outline some of the most common triggers for people who are going through drug cravings.

Most Common Drug Craving Triggers

Understanding these triggers can be a huge help for any recovering addict who wants to avoid risking a relapse. Here are some of the most common triggers for recovering users:

 

  • Being in an area where drugs were frequently used. The environment a recovering user puts themselves in is incredibly important, as going anywhere that they used drugs can be a huge trigger.

    This trigger is especially important to consider when you recognize that many users abuse drugs in their hometown. People who have recovered and are hoping to make their way to school or work may want to plan a travel route that allows them to avoid any houses or parks that they used to use drugs at.

    In some serious cases, people have found it necessary to move to a different town because their hometown (or the town that they were addicted to) causes them to crave drugs.

  • Being around other drug users, especially ones that you used with. Being around any sort of drug users can be a trigger for a recovering addict, but cravings can become particularly intense if they spend time with someone that they frequently used drugs with. This can bring back fond memories and become a serious trigger.
  • Seeing or hearing media related to drugs. A news story about drugs, a rap song with lyrics related to drug use, or movies that show drug use can all be huge triggers for anyone recovering from an addiction. These triggers can be difficult to avoid, as they can often arise without warning.
  • Boredom can be a trigger in itself. Many recovering addicts are aware that if they get high, they will suddenly feel motivated and enthusiastic. Unfortunately, this is likely to lead back down the road to addiction. Boredom should be avoided by developing a lifestyle filled with activities and hobbies.

 

Conclusion

As you can see, there are many different triggers for recovering addicts. We’ve listed just a few in this article, but there are many more to be aware of. If you or a loved one are working through recovery, don’t hesitate to get in touch with a rehab center or a drug counselor to help you along the path.

 

Written by Nigel Ford

Risk Factors for Drug Addiction

Drug addiction is not selective. There are no specific types of people who will develop an addiction – the problem can strike people from all walks of life.

However, some risk factors may make people more likely to use drugs or become susceptible to addiction than others. Things like environment, heredity, diseases, and mental health problems can all make someone more likely to develop an addiction.

In this article, we’re going to talk about some of the most common risk factors that could contribute to the development of drug addiction.

What Are Risk Factors?

A risk factor is something that can put you at risk of developing a condition, trait, or behavior. In regards to addiction, risk factors are issues that would make you more likely to develop a drug addiction at some point in life.

Understanding risk factors is useful for helping to prevent and manage addictions. While living with one or more of these risk factors by no means guarantees that you will develop an addiction, accepting and understanding these risk factors can help you avoid the possibility entirely.

Risk Factors for Drug Addiction

These are some of the most common risk factors that can increase the likelihood of someone developing an addiction.

Environment
A person’s environment – especially during childhood – can have a huge impact on the likelihood of them developing an addiction. Children raised by parents who struggle with addictions, or who grow up in neighborhoods or cities where drug addiction is prevalent are more likely to develop drug addictions later in life.

It’s not just children who are susceptible to their environments, though. An individual who has spent their whole life sober may suddenly be at risk for addiction if they move to a new town where drugs run rampant.

Heredity
While the link is not exactly clear, there is some evidence that heredity can affect someone’s likelihood to use drugs. People who are born to parents who have had addictions are more likely to use drugs themselves – even if their parents never used drugs around them.

Mental Disorders
People who struggle with mental disorders, such as anxiety, depression, and chronic stress, are much more likely to use drugs than other people. These drugs may be illicit, or they may be prescribed by a doctor – whatever the case, drug abuse, and addiction are much more common among people who have mental health problems – a problem that leads to a dual diagnosis.

People who seek medical assistance often assume that they are less likely to develop an addiction because their medication will be regulated. Unfortunately, statistically, huge numbers of Americans have gotten addicted to prescription drugs even when taking them according to their doctor’s orders.

Physical Health Problems
People with physical health problems also become more likely to abuse drugs. This is particularly true for people who are prescribed strong prescription painkillers without being properly informed about the risks and dangers involved with using these drugs.

Lack of Education
People who are uneducated about drugs and addiction may simply not see addiction as a threat. This can make them much more likely to use drugs to self-medicate or to have fun, without being aware of any of the repercussions.

Conclusion

Nobody is exempt from the dangers of drug addiction, but some people are more likely to experience problems with drugs than others. Risk factors for drug addiction include mental health problems, education, and environmental issues.

If you or a loved one are at risk of developing an addiction, don’t hesitate to seek help from a rehab facility.

Written By Nigel Ford

Is group therapy helpful for treating drug addiction?

Group therapies of all sorts are available for helping people who are struggling with drug addiction. The most popular group therapy for drug addiction is known as Narcotics Anonymous, and many people have reported that the group was instrumental in helping them stay clean and sober.

 

In this article, we’ll discuss what group therapy is and how it can be useful for helping encourage people to stay sober.

 

What is group therapy?

Group therapy is a form of therapy that allows a number of people to engage in some form of therapy.

 

In its most common form, group therapy for recovering drug users provides a format in which a number of different recovering users can share their experiences with each other.

Depending on the particular group and its facilitator, there may or may not be a ‘theme’ to the therapy session. In many cases, there is no theme, and instead, just an open discussion. However, some forms of group therapy – particularly those that are provided during a rehab program – are facilitated by a counselor or psychiatrist, who will guide the group through some therapeutic practice.

 

In most group therapy sessions, individuals will meet in a room where a number of chairs are arranged in a circle. This allows all the members of the group to engage with each other. In open-ended discussions, there is no ‘head’ of the group, and discussion will be organic.

 

Benefits of Group Therapy

Group therapy provides a number of benefits that one might not be able to experience if they were participating in one-on-one therapy.

 

  • During group therapy, a recovering drug user will be able to communicate with other drug users who have had similar experiences. Any drug user who has gone to therapy can attest to the difficulty of trying to explain addiction to someone who has never been addicted to drugs themselves.
  • Members of the group can share their own experiences, advice, tips, and tricks that they’ve used for managing their own addiction.
  • Group therapy provides recovering users an open, non-judgmental space where they can be open and honest about their addictions. Many users have a hard time finding a safe space where they can openly express themselves without being stigmatized.
  • Struggling group members will be able to model their behavior by figures in the group who have tackled their problems. Group sessions can provide recovering users with positive influences.
  • Group members can work together to overcome feelings of shame, guilt, pain, or stress, which they may otherwise have a difficult time confronting on their own or with friends and family who have never used.
  • Recovering drug users will be able to practice new social skills to help themselves reintegrate into society after sobering up.

 

These are just a few of the benefits that group therapy can provide.

 

Conclusion

Group therapy has been instrumental in helping many recovering drug users to stay sober. The group dynamic allows for a greater exchange of information and learning. If you or a loved one are struggling with recovery, perhaps group therapy could help propel you further down the road to recovery.

What kind of treatment is available for drug addiction?

Drug addiction is a challenging condition that a lot of people struggle through. One of the reasons that many people have trouble managing their addiction is because they are unaware of the types of treatment available, or because they think that certain types of treatment are unavailable to them.

 

In this article, we’re going to describe some of the common forms of treatment available for drug addicts.

 

Rehabilitation for Drug and Alcohol Users

 

The most common form of treatment for drug and alcohol users is total rehabilitation. Rehabilitation can comprise several different things, all of which are important for the treatment of drug and alcohol addictions.

 

It’s important to note that most of these things can be utilized on their own to help people work through their drug addictions. However, rehab is generally believed to be more effective than any of its individual parts because together, they provide a struggling drug user with a framework to help build a new life.

Therapy

 

One of the most important aspects of rehab is therapy. Therapy will help struggling addicts identify the issues that led to them using drugs in the first place, and will help provide them with the tools that they need to have a happy life when they complete their program.

Group Meetings

 

Group meetings are available during many rehab programs, and they are also a viable tool to help recovering addicts maintain their sobriety after they have completed treatment. Group meetings allow people to share experiences and knowledge about their addictions.

Detox

 

Depending on the severity of your addiction and the drugs that you’re addicted to, you may be required to go through a medically supervised detox before attending treatment. These will help to ensure that you can work through all the physical withdrawal symptoms before attending treatment.

 

Alternative and Holistic Treatments

 

Many studies and research papers have recognized the importance of holistic treatment for drug addiction. Holistic treatments help to treat both the mind and body of the patient. Instead of simply pushing through withdrawal and teaching an individual how to abstain from drugs, holistic treatments aim to restore health and balance throughout the whole person.

 

These include:

 

  • Biofeedback and neurofeedback programs, which identify neural imbalances that contribute to addiction.
  • Acupuncture, Somato-Emotional repatterning, or other techniques that repattern or redirect an individual’s energy and remove blockages
  • Ibogaine therapy, a form of psychedelic-assisted therapy that has a shockingly high success rate for treating serious addictions
  • Yoga, massage, and meditation, all of which contribute to mental and physical stability and can reduce the rates of relapse

 

Ideally, the best way to treat an addiction would be to tackle it from all possible angles. This would mean that including holistic treatments with traditional rehab would be most likely to lead a recovering addict to success.

 

In Conclusion

 

Drug addiction is a serious issue, and unfortunately, it can be difficult to treat. Fortunately, there are a vast number of different treatments available for helping people work through drug addictions.

What are the Most Effective Forms of Addiction Treatment?

There are a lot of different treatments that one can undergo if they’re struggling through addiction. There are various forms of rehabilitation, many holistic treatments and alternative approaches, and many different types of aftercare that can be employed.

 

The main concern that many people experience after they have completed a rehab program is whether or not they are going to relapse. Unfortunately, relapse rates with traditional rehab programs are relatively high. For this reason, it’s important to understand what forms of treatment will be the most effective for you.

 

Different Types of Addiction Treatment

 

These are some of the basic types of treatment programs available for struggling drug addicts.

 

  • Comprehensive rehab. Be it inpatient or outpatient rehab; a full rehab program often provides users with a number of the treatments described below – particularly therapy and group sessions. Rehab targets addiction from several angles, providing users with the tools and skills to avoid relapsing.
  • Many methods of therapy are employed in addiction treatment, ranging from cognitive behavioral therapy, group therapy, family therapy, and counseling. Therapy can help identify issues leading to addiction and uproot the problems at their core.
  • Group meetings. Group meetings, like Alcoholics Anonymous, can help drug addicts and alcoholics share stories, feelings, and knowledge about their recovery with other recovering users. Group meetings are often cited as being highly effective for preventing relapse.
  • Iboga is a very powerful hallucinogenic substance that thousands of people have used to treat their addictions. Iboga is a very intense experience that is not for everyone – however, those who are willing to work with iboga find a shockingly high rate of success when treating their drug addictions.
  • Alternative treatments. Many different alternative treatments can help drug addicts recover, including acupuncture, yoga, massage, biofeedback, and Somato-Emotional Release therapy.

What Types of Treatment Are Most Effective?

 

Ultimately, the type of treatment that would be effective for you depends a lot upon your personal psychology and physiology. One treatment that is effective for someone else may not work for you.

 

This is why it’s important to seek a treatment center that can help you develop a routine tailored to your own needs. Some factors to consider when ensuring effective treatment include:

 

  • Family therapy. Will you be given a chance to share with your family in a counseling setting?
  • Legal services. If necessary, will you have legal services available to help you?
  • Mental health services. Therapy and other services are necessary for recovering addicts.
  • Medical services. Things like detox, HIV/AIDS treatment, and other medical services are important.
    Educational services. It’s important to learn about addiction and psychology during recovery.
  • Continued care. Once you complete the program, will you be taken care of afterward with group meetings and checkups?

 

All of these things can make or break a recovering addict’s chances for success, so it’s important to look out for what you need to ensure that treatment will be effective.

Conclusion

 

The efficacy of addiction treatment is largely dependent on the individual and the type of treatment involved. If you are able to secure a treatment plan that meets your needs and is offered by qualified professionals using evidence-based techniques, then you will be most likely to succeed in your treatment.

 

Written by Nigel Ford