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Tag Archive: addiction treatment

What are the Most Effective Forms of Addiction Treatment?

There are a lot of different treatments that one can undergo if they’re struggling through addiction. There are various forms of rehabilitation, many holistic treatments and alternative approaches, and many different types of aftercare that can be employed.

 

The main concern that many people experience after they have completed a rehab program is whether or not they are going to relapse. Unfortunately, relapse rates with traditional rehab programs are relatively high. For this reason, it’s important to understand what forms of treatment will be the most effective for you.

 

Different Types of Addiction Treatment

 

These are some of the basic types of treatment programs available for struggling drug addicts.

One treatment that is effective for someone else may not work for you

  • Comprehensive rehab. Be it inpatient or outpatient rehab; a full rehab program often provides users with a number of the treatments described below – particularly therapy and group sessions. Rehab targets addiction from several angles, providing users with the tools and skills to avoid relapsing.
  • Many methods of therapy are employed in addiction treatment, ranging from cognitive behavioral therapy, group therapy, family therapy, and counseling. Therapy can help identify issues leading to addiction and uproot the problems at their core.
  • Group meetings. Group meetings, like Alcoholics Anonymous, can help drug addicts and alcoholics share stories, feelings, and knowledge about their recovery with other recovering users. Group meetings are often cited as being highly effective for preventing relapse.
  • Iboga is a very powerful hallucinogenic substance that thousands of people have used to treat their addictions. Iboga is a very intense experience that is not for everyone – however, those who are willing to work with iboga find a shockingly high rate of success when treating their drug addictions.
  • Alternative treatments. Many different alternative treatments can help drug addicts recover, including acupuncture, yoga, massage, biofeedback, and Somato-Emotional Release therapy.

What Types of Treatment Are Most Effective?

 

Ultimately, the type of treatment that would be effective for you depends a lot upon your personal psychology and physiology. One treatment that is effective for someone else may not work for you.

 

This is why it’s important to seek a treatment center that can help you develop a routine tailored to your own needs. Some factors to consider when ensuring effective treatment include:

 

  • Family therapy. Will you be given a chance to share with your family in a counseling setting?
  • Legal services. If necessary, will you have legal services available to help you?
  • Mental health services. Therapy and other services are necessary for recovering addicts.
  • Medical services. Things like detox, HIV/AIDS treatment, and other medical services are important.
    Educational services. It’s important to learn about addiction and psychology during recovery.
  • Continued care. Once you complete the program, will you be taken care of afterward with group meetings and checkups?

 

All of these things can make or break a recovering addict’s chances for success, so it’s important to look out for what you need to ensure that treatment will be effective.

Conclusion

 

The efficacy of addiction treatment is largely dependent on the individual and the type of treatment involved. If you are able to secure a treatment plan that meets your needs and is offered by qualified professionals using evidence-based techniques, then you will be most likely to succeed in your treatment.

 

Written by Nigel Ford

Systematic and Medically Supervised Withdrawal from a Drug

Medically supervised withdrawal from a drug, also referred to as detoxification, is the first step in substance abuse treatment programs and it involves the removal of these toxic products from the bloodstream.

An indicator of addiction to a substance is the onset of withdrawal symptoms when trying to remove the drugs from the body. These can range from mild to severe in nature, and there are situations which can be life-threatening depending on the drug used as well as the level of dependency and the method of intake.

Withdrawal symptoms can be both psychological and physical and abruptly stopping the offending drug is usually not suggested. Therefore, medically assisted detoxification is recommended to prevent patients experiencing unwanted withdrawal effects.

assisted or Supervised Withdrawal

Medically Assisted Withdrawal

Medically assisted detoxification is accomplished in a controlled facility which is supervised by healthcare professionals 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Some patients may need to be weaned down from the drugs they are using in order to slowly get the product in their system down to nothing, and others may require being prescribed other medications in order to manage withdrawal symptoms and cravings.

The patients most likely to require medically assisted withdrawal include those who are addicted to drugs such as:

  • Prescription opioids
  • Heroin
  • Alcohol
  • Benzodiazepines

Prescription Opioids and Heroin

Prescription opioid addiction is a public health emergency currently in the United States with over 40 Americans dying from opioid overdoses every day in the country. In 2012 alone, over 2 million Americans over the age of 12 were addicted to these medications and another near 500,000 people were addicted to heroin. Heroin is also an opioid but an illegal one.

Opioid addiction needs to be managed medically since withdrawing from these drugs causes uncomfortable symptoms and signs such as:

  • Excessive sweating with intermittent chills
  • Nausea and/or vomiting
  • Generalized muscle aches and pains
  • Restlessness
  • Agitation
  • Sleeping disturbances
  • Depression
  • Irritability
  • Anxiety

Patients addicted to prescription opioids are usually managed by gradually reducing the dose of the drug until it has worked out completely from their bodies. Heroin is managed differently in that methadone is dispensed to these patients to take over the effects caused by the drug. The methadone is then gradually tapered down until it can be stopped.

Medications such as buprenorphine and buprenorphine combined with naloxone are also used to help treat opioid addiction and dependency.

Alcohol

Suddenly stopping the intake of alcohol in someone who has a severe dependency on this product can be life-threatening.

A condition known as delirium tremens (DT) can develop as a result of alcohol withdrawal and may present with the following symptoms and signs:

  • Agitation
  • Fevers
  • Confusion
  • Hallucinations
  • Seizures

In order to avoid these severe conditions, medically assisted withdrawal from alcohol is often necessary and entails the use of medications such as benzodiazepines. Mineral and vitamin supplementation may also be prescribed to replace those lost as a result of excessive alcohol use.

Benzodiazepines

These drugs do have their place in treating anxiety and sleep disorders but there are patients who become dependent on them and need help to remove them from their system.

Benzodiazepine withdrawal is performed in a similar fashion to that of opioid withdrawal in that the dosage of the medication is tapered down until it is completely metabolized by the body and completely removed from the patient’s bloodstream.

Patients addicted to short-acting benzodiazepines are prescribed longer-acting ones during medically managed withdrawal in order to reduce the chance of potential side effects.

Change can be Hard regarding Drugs and Alcohol

alcohol rehab san diego In the beginning, change is very difficult to any drug- or alcohol-addicted person. This is due to the possibility of changing your surroundings, friends, and sometimes family upon who you socialize. You may need to find new friends, leave your family home, or even stop frequenting your normal hangouts to continue the healing process and start making the change to the path to recovery. At this step, you start thinking about the good ole times when you hung out and partied with friends before you really got serious about becoming clean and sober. The one thing you forget is that they don’t want you to be clean and sober. Rather, they still want you down there with them, living the life of an addict.

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse National Survey on Drug Use and Health, chronic alcohol use affects the lives of 50 percent of the population in the U.S. In noting some of the alcohol recovery statistics out there, there are nearly 22.5 million people in the U.S. who are in need of treatment or alternatives to alcohol treatment and sadly only 3.8 million people will actually get the help they need.

The NIDA also reports that approximately 41 percent of admissions to recovery treatment programs are for alcohol use. Of the people admitted to alcohol programs, 60 percent were white, 21 percent were African-American, and 13.7 percent were of Hispanic origin..

AA and NA

For a successful recovery from drugs and alcohol, you need to now find a support group that will help you through the process, preferably a group that has succeeded and can help you see the signs of relapse. Support is important because recovering addicts have been there and can pull you back out before you drink or do drugs again. There are many online resources and groups that can help you with your recovery.

Two of the most successful is Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and Narcotics Anonymous (NA). These are support groups that usually meet 2-3 days a week and are formed of recovering drug and/or alcohol addicts that have been clean and sober for many years and are experts in reading the signs of relapse. They will even assign you a sponsor who you can talk with any time day or night along your road to recovery in between meetings if you start to fall prey to the addiction again.

The results of AA’s most recent study in 2007 were promising. According to AA, 33 percent of the 8,000 North American members it surveyed had remained sober for over 10 years. Twelve percent were sober for 5 to 10 years; 24 percent were sober 1 to 5 years; and 31 percent were sober for less than a year.

Alcohol Abuse

Relapses on the Road to Recovery

If you start using the substance again, it will be harder for you to quit. You may try to just tell yourself only one drink, that’s all, or “I will have or just one pill today, but I can stop.” This is the time when you need a meeting or to contact your sponsor and be truthful and honest of your urges and wants. This is a normal sign every drug and alcohol addict goes through. The ones that reach for help have a higher rate of success in getting through this step towards recovery. During this period of time, communication is a key factor to express your urges and desires instead of reaching for a drink or a pill to make yourself feel better.

For any drug or alcohol addict, the change step will always be crucial and difficult in many ways. Regardless, completing this step is a huge accomplishment both mentally and physically. Making the right changes and correct choices will help guide you towards your goal of recovery. You just need to be strong when your old pals call and try to get you to come over. When those negative thoughts that drove you to drink and use medication creep back in to your mind, just say ”No!” Instead, surround yourself with the people that support you and can help you from falling back into addiction.

Pacific Bay Recovery is the top drug and alcohol addiction treatment center in San Diego CA. With over a 90% success rate long term, the providers at Pacific Bay enjoy working with drug, alcohol and dual diagnosis patients! Call us today for the top private inpatient rehab center in all of California.

Resources:

The Fix Does AA Really Work? A Round-Up of Recent Studies Retrieved http://www.thefix.com/content/the-real-statistics-of-aa7301

 

Saintjude Retreats Addiction Recovery Statistics Retrieved http://www.soberforever.net/addictions-recovery/addiction-recovery-statistics.cfm