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Tag Archive: prescription drugs

Prescription Drug Treatment

Overcoming prescription drug addiction is one of the most difficult things a person can do. For this reason, it is important to have a team of professionals helping along the way. Prescription drug addiction can negatively affect all aspects of a person’s life, from the ability to hold a job to the ability to maintain healthy relationships. People become addicted to prescription drugs for a wide variety of reasons, such as obtaining the drugs from their own doctor or taking the drugs without a prescription. Regardless of what started the addiction, those who find themselves addicted to prescription drugs should trust professionals to help.

While there are a wide variety of prescription drugs that people abuse, the most common include opiates, stimulants, and sedatives. Oftentimes, there are signs that a person is on the path to addiction, such as, “losing” prescriptions or asking for refills early, visiting multiple doctors, mood swings, and irritability when drugs are not available to name a few. Addiction to different prescription drugs causes different symptoms in the patient. For example, stimulant abuse can manifest as high blood pressure, hostility, and irregular heartbeat. Sedative abuse can manifest as confusion or memory problems. Opiate abuse manifests as low blood pressure, depression, or gastrointestinal problems.

Addiction to different prescription drugs causes different symptoms in the patient
Left untreated, prescription abuse can lead to mental and emotional health problems, issues with keeping a job or with the law, and in the worst cases, prescription addiction can lead to death. While some people take prescription drugs that are not prescribed to them, the majority of prescription drug addicts began taking the medication in the direction of their doctor. Addiction has been shown to have a genetic component. Therefore, some people are more predisposed to addiction than others. It is difficult to know for sure who these people are prior to prescribing them medications. Many of these medications are prescribed after surgery, or to treat pain. Experiencing the “good feelings” that come with the drugs in addition to the bodybuilding up tolerance to the drug, can lead people to take higher and higher doses over time. Thus, leading to drug addiction. In short, most people do not set out to become addicted to prescription drugs. It is a by-product of them following their doctors’ instructions.

Prescription drug abuse is not just a problem in adults, it is a problem in teens as well. People who start abusing prescription drugs as teens are more likely to use other substances as well. Prescription drug abuse is very difficult for a person to overcome on his or her own. Pacific Bay Recovery utilizes a variety of approaches, including a support team, to help people overcome their addiction. Those who choose to seek help at Pacific Bay Recovery will benefit from the support team, along with various medications to help with withdrawal symptoms and drug cravings.

Those who are interested in getting help for their prescription drug addiction should contact Pacific Bay Recovery at (858) 263-9700. Complimentary and confidential evaluations are always offered so patients can understand the methods Pacific Bay Recovery utilizes to help those addicted to prescription drugs.

The Facts on Fentanyl

Fentanyl is a drug that has been around a while, but just now is becoming abused. This drug is a powerful synthetic opioid that is prescribed under the brand names Duragesic, Actiq, and Sublimaze. Here are some facts about fentanyl.

About the Drug

Fentanyl is similar to the opioid morphine, but it is actually 100 times more potent. The drug fentanyl is a schedule II prescription drug that is only given to patients with severe, intractable pain. Street names for fentanyl are GoodFella, Jackpot, Friend, Dance Fever, China Girl, China White, Apache, Murder 8, TNT, and Tango & Cash.

How People use Fentanyl

When prescribed by a doctor, fentanyl is administered via transdermal patch, injection, or in lozenges. However, fentanyl and its analogs associated with overdoses have been produced in clandestine laboratories. Nonpharmaceutical fentanyl is sold as a power, spiked on blotter paper, as tablets that mimic other opioids, or mixed with or substituted for heroin. Because drug dealers are now manufacturing fentanyl, people can snort, swallow, or inject the synthetic drug.

How Fentanyl Patches are Abused

Duragesic patches are abused by people who just wish to get high. People who abuse fentanyl are not in pain. The fentanyl patches contain a gel in a pouch lying between two membranes. The abuser will eat the fentanyl gel, giving them a big dose all at once. Many fentanyl abusers steal the patches from a friend, family member, or person in his/her care, and then apply them to their skin or eat the gel.

Who Abuses Fentanyl

Fentanyl abuse can occur when a person exaggerates his/her pain in order to get a prescription from the doctor. An injured person could pretend to be in great pain just to get fentanyl. Physicians may over-prescribe fentanyl by giving the patient the medication when he/she does not need it, or for longer than he/she requires the drug. In addition, healthcare and pharmacy workers can become addicted to or abuse fentanyl, because they have access to prescriptions and medications.

How Fentanyl affects your Brain

Fentanyl works by binding with the body’s natural opioid receptors, which are located in areas of the brain that control emotions and pain. Like morphine and heroin, fentanyl has a high addiction potential. When opioid drugs bind to the body’s opioid receptors, they drive up dopamine levels in reward area, which produces a state of relaxation and euphoria. The effects of fentanyl also include confusion, nausea, vomiting, constipation, drowsiness, sedation, addiction, tolerance, respiratory depression, unconsciousness, coma, and with overdose, death.

What Makes Fentanyl Dangerous

Fentanyl is a dangerous drug when used recreationally. Opioid receptors found in the brain control breathing rate. When fentanyl is consumed or absorbed in high doses, it can cause your breathing to completely stop. This is especially true when a the drug user is not aware of what he/she is taking. Fentanyl sold on the street poses many dangers, as it amplifies the potency of heroin and cocaine.

The Drug Abuse/Use Problem in America

According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), 39 million people in the U.S. have used prescription drugs for non-medical purposes. That’s roughly 10% of the entire population. Of those who abuse drugs, teens and adolescents make up 3 million of them.

Signs and Symptoms of Fentanyl Abuse

There are a number of signs and symptoms that alert you that someone you know, love, and wish to help is abusing fentanyl. These signs and symptoms include:

  • Difficulty seeingDetox Center San Diego
  • Depression
  • Loss of appetite
  • Itching
  • Nausea and/or vomiting
  • Retention of urine
  • Dry mouth
  • Pin-point pupils (constriction)
  • Sweating
  • Hallucinations
  • Bad dreams
  • Weight loss

Pacific Bay Recovery is the top drug rehab center in Southern California, offering first rate treatment for both prescription and illicit drugs. Most insurance is accepted at the San Diego drug rehab center, call us today!

Resources

Higashikawa Y, Suzuki S. Studies on 1-(2-phenethyl)-4-(N-propionylanilino) piperidine (fentanyl) and its related compounds. VI. Structure-analgesic activity relationship for fentanyl, methyl-substituted fentanyls and other analogues. Forensic Toxicol. 2008;26(1):1-5. doi:10.1007/s11419-007-0039-1.

Nelson L, Schwaner R. Transdermal fentanyl: Pharmacology and toxicology. J Med Toxicol. 2009;5(4):230-241. doi:10.1007/BF03178274.

Volpe DA, Tobin GAM, Mellon RD, et al. Uniform assessment and ranking of opioid Mu receptor binding constants for selected opioid drugs. Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 2011;59(3):385-390. doi:10.1016/j.yrtph.2010.12.007.