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Tag Archive: drug addiction

How to Heal a Family Damaged by Addiction

Addiction doesn’t just damage the person who’s addicted. It affects friends, families, co-workers, and pretty much everyone else who is involved in the addict’s life. While this damage can be difficult to cope with – and, in some cases, quite severe – it can always be healed. In this article, we’re going to discuss how you can help your family heal after it has been affected by addiction.

 Remember, seeking San Diego drug rehab is one of the best ways to help you and your loved ones stay safe in recovery.

 

How Families Can Be Affected by Addiction

 

There are a lot of ways that a family can be affected by someone’s addiction. A family can be affected when one of its members becomes addicted, or when one of its member’s friends or partners struggles with addiction.

 These are some of the most common issues faced by families with loved ones in addiction.

 ● The simple stress of caring for a loved one struggling with an addiction can be traumatic. 

 ● Many drug users and alcoholics struggle financially, and some of them turn to theft to help them finance their addictions. This can break trust among their family members or anyone else that they steal with.

 ● Drug addiction tends to lead to emotional instability. Drug addicts are more likely to lash out and behave irrationally than sober people. This can lead to long-lasting repercussions and alter relationships.

 ● Some drug addicts and alcoholics can become violent during their addictions. This can lead to domestic abuse and related traumas.

 As you can see, there are plenty of ways in which addiction can affect a family. These issues can be exacerbated if you’re living with a drug user during the COVID-19 quarantine. Fortunately, there are many ways to overcome this damage.

 

How to Heal from Familial Damage

 

The first thing that you’re going to need to do is to ensure that the addict is sobered up, or at least committed to recovery. Otherwise, they’ll likely fall into the same behavior patterns. Once they have sobered up, you can begin to start rebuilding trust.

 ● Consider seeking family therapy. Some rehab companies offer family therapy that can help the family and the addict reconcile their issues.

 ● Start slowly. If you were stolen from, you may not feel comfortable leaving your purse lying around in the same room as the recovering addict. However, over time, you will become more comfortable leaving valuables around them.

 ● Be open and honest. Discuss the issues. Chances are the recovering addict who feels guilty about what they’ve done. Even though you are upset, try to approach them with compassion and understanding.

 

Conclusion

 

Drug addiction can be dangerous and destructive, and it can impact the families of those who are addicted. However, in most cases, this damage doesn’t have to be permanent. As long as you are open-minded and willing to forgive, you should be able to heal any familial damage done by a struggling drug user.

 

Written by Nigel Ford

Risk Factors for Drug Addiction

Drug addiction is not selective. There are no specific types of people who will develop an addiction – the problem can strike people from all walks of life.

 

However, some risk factors may make people more likely to use drugs or become susceptible to addiction than others. Things like environment, heredity, diseases, and mental health problems can all make someone more likely to develop an addiction.

 

In this article, we’re going to talk about some of the most common risk factors that could contribute to the development of drug addiction.

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Drug Abuse and Trauma

Drug abuse and trauma often go hand-in-hand. Many drug users are the victims of trauma already, and yet the addictions that they are likely to fall into may cause even more trauma. This is part of the vicious cycle of drug addiction, and one of the most difficult barriers on the road to recovery.

In this article, we’ll talk about how drug abuse and trauma are linked together and how understanding these issues can make someone more likely to overcome their addictions.

How Trauma Can Lead to Addiction

One of the main leading causes of addiction is trauma.

Trauma is an emotional issue that arises when a person has to go through an intense experience that they are unable to mentally cope with. Since the mind is incapable of coping with the experience, it is internalized in the body in the form of trauma.

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Risk Factors for Drug Addiction

Drug addiction is not selective. There are no specific types of people who will develop an addiction – the problem can strike people from all walks of life.

However, some risk factors may make people more likely to use drugs or become susceptible to addiction than others. Things like environment, heredity, diseases, and mental health problems can all make someone more likely to develop an addiction.

In this article, we’re going to talk about some of the most common risk factors that could contribute to the development of drug addiction.

What Are Risk Factors?

A risk factor is something that can put you at risk of developing a condition, trait, or behavior. In regards to addiction, risk factors are issues that would make you more likely to develop a drug addiction at some point in life.

Understanding risk factors is useful for helping to prevent and manage addictions. While living with one or more of these risk factors by no means guarantees that you will develop an addiction, accepting and understanding these risk factors can help you avoid the possibility entirely.

Risk Factors for Drug Addiction

These are some of the most common risk factors that can increase the likelihood of someone developing an addiction.

Environment
A person’s environment – especially during childhood – can have a huge impact on the likelihood of them developing an addiction. Children raised by parents who struggle with addictions, or who grow up in neighborhoods or cities where drug addiction is prevalent are more likely to develop drug addictions later in life.

It’s not just children who are susceptible to their environments, though. An individual who has spent their whole life sober may suddenly be at risk for addiction if they move to a new town where drugs run rampant.

Heredity
While the link is not exactly clear, there is some evidence that heredity can affect someone’s likelihood to use drugs. People who are born to parents who have had addictions are more likely to use drugs themselves – even if their parents never used drugs around them.

Mental Disorders
People who struggle with mental disorders, such as anxiety, depression, and chronic stress, are much more likely to use drugs than other people. These drugs may be illicit, or they may be prescribed by a doctor – whatever the case, drug abuse, and addiction are much more common among people who have mental health problems – a problem that leads to a dual diagnosis.

People who seek medical assistance often assume that they are less likely to develop an addiction because their medication will be regulated. Unfortunately, statistically, huge numbers of Americans have gotten addicted to prescription drugs even when taking them according to their doctor’s orders.

Physical Health Problems
People with physical health problems also become more likely to abuse drugs. This is particularly true for people who are prescribed strong prescription painkillers without being properly informed about the risks and dangers involved with using these drugs.

Lack of Education
People who are uneducated about drugs and addiction may simply not see addiction as a threat. This can make them much more likely to use drugs to self-medicate or to have fun, without being aware of any of the repercussions.

Conclusion

Nobody is exempt from the dangers of drug addiction, but some people are more likely to experience problems with drugs than others. Risk factors for drug addiction include mental health problems, education, and environmental issues.

If you or a loved one are at risk of developing an addiction, don’t hesitate to seek help from a rehab facility.

Written By Nigel Ford

How can I help a recovering drug addict stay sober?

If you or a loved one have struggled with drug addiction, then you’ve likely seen the struggle that takes place both during and after the main phase of addiction.

 

The drug users who are fortunate enough to stop using have only won part of the battle – the real battle begins after cleaning up and learning to try to reintegrate into normal life while battling cravings, nostalgic memories, and changes in physical or mental health.

 

One of the best supports for recovering drug addicts are their friends and family, and one of the best things that you can do for them is to learn how you can help them stay sober. In this article, we’re going to describe some of the best ways to help a recovering drug addict stay sober.

Helping Someone On the Road to Recovery

These are some of the best tips and tricks that you can use to help a recovering drug user stay sober.

 

Get Some Education

It can be hard to work with someone struggling through their recovery if you don’t know what they’re going through. To compound that, you’ll never really know what they’re going through until you’ve been there yourself.

 

The least you can do, though, is to learn about their addiction. You can begin to understand how cravings work, what they struggled through, and the neurological issues that they’ll struggle with.

 

A note of caution: flaunting an educated perspective to someone who has actually struggled through addiction can lead to you coming off ‘high-and-mighty.’ Use the education to both of your benefits, but don’t try to act like you know more than them.

 

Be Prepared

Recovering drug users will be going through a lot. They’ll be prone to emotional outbursts and instability, fatigue, and other physical or mental problems. In short, they may be rather unpredictable.

 

The most important thing to keep in mind here is that you’ll need to stay on your feet, and you’ll need to treat them with love and compassion – even if they’re acting unreasonably at the moment.

 

Encourage Positive Changes

It can be difficult for a recovering drug user to know which direction to move in. You can help them in a number of ways.

 

  • Encourage them to hang out with sober, like-minded people. Perhaps introduce them to some friends.
  • Help them build an environment that supports their sobriety.
  • Give them positive feedback about the changes that they’ve made and the positive effect that they’re having.
  • Help them find new hobbies and activities that they (or perhaps both of you) can enjoy so that they have something to fill their time with.

Stay Healthy

Don’t get so invested that you begin to sacrifice your own mental health. This might seem difficult at times, but it’s important to make sure that you only help them within your own capabilities. If you get burned out, then you can’t really help anyone.

 

Written by Nigel Ford

What kind of treatment is available for drug addiction?

Drug addiction is a challenging condition that a lot of people struggle through. One of the reasons that many people have trouble managing their addiction is because they are unaware of the types of treatment available, or because they think that certain types of treatment are unavailable to them.

 

In this article, we’re going to describe some of the common forms of treatment available for drug addicts.

 

Rehabilitation for Drug and Alcohol Users

 

The most common form of treatment for drug and alcohol users is total rehabilitation. Rehabilitation can comprise several different things, all of which are important for the treatment of drug and alcohol addictions.

 

It’s important to note that most of these things can be utilized on their own to help people work through their drug addictions. However, rehab is generally believed to be more effective than any of its individual parts because together, they provide a struggling drug user with a framework to help build a new life.

Therapy

 

One of the most important aspects of rehab is therapy. Therapy will help struggling addicts identify the issues that led to them using drugs in the first place, and will help provide them with the tools that they need to have a happy life when they complete their program.

Group Meetings

 

Group meetings are available during many rehab programs, and they are also a viable tool to help recovering addicts maintain their sobriety after they have completed treatment. Group meetings allow people to share experiences and knowledge about their addictions.

Detox

 

Depending on the severity of your addiction and the drugs that you’re addicted to, you may be required to go through a medically supervised detox before attending treatment. These will help to ensure that you can work through all the physical withdrawal symptoms before attending treatment.

 

Alternative and Holistic Treatments

 

Many studies and research papers have recognized the importance of holistic treatment for drug addiction. Holistic treatments help to treat both the mind and body of the patient. Instead of simply pushing through withdrawal and teaching an individual how to abstain from drugs, holistic treatments aim to restore health and balance throughout the whole person.

 

These include:

 

  • Biofeedback and neurofeedback programs, which identify neural imbalances that contribute to addiction.
  • Acupuncture, Somato-Emotional repatterning, or other techniques that repattern or redirect an individual’s energy and remove blockages
  • Ibogaine therapy, a form of psychedelic-assisted therapy that has a shockingly high success rate for treating serious addictions
  • Yoga, massage, and meditation, all of which contribute to mental and physical stability and can reduce the rates of relapse

 

Ideally, the best way to treat an addiction would be to tackle it from all possible angles. This would mean that including holistic treatments with traditional rehab would be most likely to lead a recovering addict to success.

 

In Conclusion

 

Drug addiction is a serious issue, and unfortunately, it can be difficult to treat. Fortunately, there are a vast number of different treatments available for helping people work through drug addictions.

How can I know if I need to seek treatment for drug addiction?

Not every drug user is sure of whether or not they need treatment. Some users claim that they are simply recreational drug users, and do not worry that their habit is causing problems.

Rarely, this can be the case. Unfortunately, in most situations, recreational drug users are on a path towards addiction. If you’re not sure of whether or not you need to seek treatment, then this article should give you the insight that you need.

When do I need treatment?

 

The simple way to look at this is to ask yourself if you are experiencing any of the following:

 

  • Signs and symptoms of drug abuse.

  • The development of tolerance.

  • Withdrawal symptoms.

If you do not reduce your drug usage early on, you will quickly experience drug tolerance

Signs and symptoms of drug abuse are the first indicators that you need to seek treatment. If you don’t seek treatment at this stage, you will begin to develop a drug tolerance. If you still refrain from seeking treatment after you’ve developed a tolerance, you are likely to develop withdrawal symptoms.

 

Here are some more details about these stages of addiction.

 

Signs and Symptoms of Drug Abuse

 

If you are displaying any of these signs or symptoms of drug abuse, it’s a good idea to seek treatment before the problem becomes any more serious.

 

  • Spending more money on drugs than you intend to
  • Missing out on social gatherings, work, or family time to do drugs
  • Feeling like you’re unable to socialize or find motivation without drugs
  • Hiding your drug use from friends or family
  • Thinking about drugs when you’re not using them
  • Having to lie or ‘bend the truth’ in regards to your drug use
  • Experiencing problems with authorities as a result of drug use
  • Developing mood instabilities or noticing cognitive issues, like ‘brain fog’ or slow thinking
  • Noticing changes in energy levels, lethargy

 

Drug Tolerance

 

If you do not reduce your drug usage early on, you will quickly experience drug tolerance.

 

A tolerant user requires larger and larger doses of a substance to experience the same effects that they did when they first started using. In most cases, drug tolerance will ‘plateau’ – that is, it will level out at a certain phase.

 

Most often, in this phase, users are unable to achieve the desirable effects that they once did. A person becomes physically or psychologically dependent on the drug and may experience withdrawal symptoms.

 

Withdrawal Symptoms

 

Withdrawal symptoms occur when your body is physically dependent on a drug. At this stage, you will require the drug to function normally. If you aren’t able to use the drug, you may experience symptoms like:

 

  • Sweating
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Pain in the joints and bones
  • Restless legs syndrome
  • Anxiety, depression, and mood instability
  • Inability to socialize
  • Insomnia or excessive sleep
  • Loss of appetite, weight loss
  • Itchy, crawling skin
  • Shaking
  • Diarrhea and digestive issues
  • Dehydration
  • Seizures

 

In Conclusion

 

If you experience any signs and symptoms of drug addiction or abuse, it’s best to seek treatment as soon as possible. If you don’t, then you run the risk of developing a more serious addiction down the road.

 

Written by Nigel Ford

Keys to Successful Drug Addiction Recovery

Drug addiction recovery will look different for each person because all people are unique. Some people may need a stronger emphasis on certain parts of the recovery, and some people may struggle more with other parts. While drug addiction recovery is unique for each person, there are a few key factors that can benefit all people undergoing drug addiction recovery.

First off, typically the longer a treatment program is, the more successful it will be. This especially applies to those addicts who are deep in their addiction. Addiction occurs because neuro pathways in the brain have changed to make the addict need a drug. Every time the addict uses his or her substance of choice, those pathways are reinforced and become even harder to change. Therefore, a person who has been suffering from addiction for many years may benefit from a more extended treatment program than someone who is a new user. Some research has found that programs over 90 days offer the best chance for success.

It is also important for the person undergoing recovery treatment to have a strong network of people who understand their struggle. While healthy family and friend relationships are key to help an addict’s recovery last, it is equally as important for an addict to feel they have a network of people who understand what they have been through. Treatment programs that encompass a full lifestyle change versus solely focusing on no longer using typically have the best results.

While outside influences and support groups are important, at the end of the day, the addict is the most important part of drug addiction recovery. Patients need to be willing to put themselves first, to show up to all meetings, get a sponsor, go to family and individual therapy, re-learn how to manage money and be a productive member of society, and ultimately forgive themselves. Many patients end up relapsing because the guilt and shame they feel are just too much to bear. A key part of drug addiction recovery success is rooted in forgiveness. Forgiveness allows the addict to put themselves first and take the necessary steps to maintain their recovery and avoiding relapse.

There is no shortcut to a successful drug recovery. Patients and families must be willing to put in the work, both in the short term and the long term, to ensure the person suffering from addiction can stay sober. The most important thing is for an addict to undergo recovery for themselves. They need to remember it is ok to prioritize their recovery process, whether that means meetings every day, or therapy, or getting a whole new group of friends. Following the recovery process without taking any shortcuts is key to remaining sober.

Drug addiction recovery is not a one size fits all. Some people may stay in a treatment program for a few months, while others may remain for a year. Each person’s circumstance and needs are different. It is key to find a recovery program that focuses on creating a customized treatment plan. For this reason, it is also important for addicts not to compare themselves to others and to never lose hope. While recovery will not be the same for everyone, having a strong support system, sticking to the program, and forgiving oneself are all necessary keys for an addict to have a successful recovery.