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Tag Archive: withdrawal symptoms

Drug Abuse in the United States

Drug abuse is a major problem in the United States. It can come in the form of alcohol, tobacco, illicit drugs, or prescription drugs. While some of these substances are legal, when people begin using any kind of substance in an effort to get high, it becomes drug abuse. Drug abuse is a problem that affects a wide range of people, from teenagers to adults, students to professionals, athletes, you name it. Drug abuse can occur for a wide variety of reasons. Therefore, those suffering from drug addiction require a personalized treatment plan in order to begin the process of recovery.

Alcohol is one of the most common drugs. Many people drink alcohol, and in moderation, it can be ok. However, 6.5% of the population in the U.S. admits to heavy drinking. Heavy drinking can lead to problems such as liver and pancreas disease. Women who abuse alcohol while pregnant can event affect their child. Many people discount signs of alcohol abuse because alcohol is “legal.” However, it is a very widely abused substance and should be taken seriously,

Hallucinogens such as PCP and LSD are commonly used among drug abusers
Marijuana is another widely abused substance and is very popular among the teenage demographic. While it may not be as fatal as other drugs, it can still negative effects on the user. Cocaine is another abused drug. People who use cocaine typically do so for its stimulant effects. It keeps people awake for long period s of time and can give the user euphoric effects. While the effects typically only last half an hour, the drug can quickly alter the person’s body putting them at a much higher risk of stroke. Hallucinogens such as PCP and LSD are commonly used among drug abusers. While it’s much harder to overdose from these drugs, many people who utilize them are at risk of secondary injuries from distorted perception such as falling.

Heroin is possibly the most addictive drug in the world. Unfortunately, in recent years, heroin use in the U.S. has surged due to the crackdown on prescription medications. Heroin is extremely addictive because it changes brain function. With regular use, those who use heroin quickly develop a tolerance and find themselves unable to function without more and more heroin in their systems. Another reason for heroin is so addictive is due to the painful detox. Even with one use, people may start feeling withdrawal symptoms after the drug has worn off. People who inject heroin will find themselves at a higher risk of blood-borne infections due to dirty needles. They are also at risk for Hepatitis C, HIV, kidney disease, abscesses, and even death.

There is a multitude of drugs people choose to abuse for various reasons. Sometimes it is because they were legally prescribed, sometimes it is because they were just curious to try a drug. However, regardless of the user’s drug of choice, treatment, and a strong support system is always important in the road to recovery. Much of the recovery includes detox, therapy, and coping mechanisms to help the drug abuser lead a healthier and drug-free lifestyle.

What is Cannabis Use Disorder and How Do I Overcome It?

Marijuana abuse is far more common than people realize and affects almost 4 million citizens of the United States of America each and every year. Cannabis use has increased significantly in the USA as it has become legal in more and more states. But as this decriminalization occurs, so does the incidence of cannabis use disorder increased. How do you identify if you have an issue with marijuana abuse and what is available for people with this disorder?

 

What is a cannabis use disorder? Do I have one?

 

Smoking marijuana in itself does not mean you are addicted. There is a strict definition of abuse which is when the use of the substance begins to impact one’s life in a negative way. Officially it is defined as

 

Cannabis use disorder is the continued use of cannabis despite clinically significant distress or impairment which usually includes:

 

  • A strong desire to take cannabis
  • Difficulties in controlling its use
  • Persisting in its use despite harmful consequences
  • A higher priority is given to cannabis use than other activities and obligations
  • Increased tolerance
  • A physical withdrawal state when the drug is not ingested”

 

If you or somebody you know suffers from these symptoms, they may be suffering from a cannabis use disorder.

Cannabis use disorder is the continued use of cannabis despite clinically significant distress or impairment

The withdrawal symptoms can be significant in around one-half of patients. The symptoms can include:

 

  • Anxiety
  • Irritability
  • Depression
  • Restlessness
  • Disturbed sleep
  • GI symptoms such as diarrhea or constipation
  • A reduced appetite

 

As such some patients wish to enter a rehabilitation facility during this time. These symptoms often resolve within a few weeks – but they can be abated via various medical treatments in the inpatient facilities.

 

 

How do they treat marijuana abuse?

 

Treatment is often undertaken at specialist rehabilitation centers across the United States of America. This treatment is, of course, dependent on the individual and will be tweaked dependent on your specific set of circumstances. However, there are a number of options and treatment often involves:

 

  • Psychological treatments like cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), which tries not to focus on the pass but on the present. CBT tries to change your actions by helping you understand why you act in a certain way.
  • Other psychological treatments include things like motivational interviewing, whereby the therapist tried to induce the motivation to quit from within you.
  • No medicine treats the actual disease, but there are a number of medications that can be prescribed during the withdrawal period (eg anxiolytics like Diazepam can be given on a short-term basis to reduce symptoms of anxiety during the withdrawal).

 

 

If you or somebody you know is suffering from an addiction such as marijuana abuse then get in contact with a specialist rehabilitation centre today. Cannabis abuse is an epidemic across the USA today but is severely under recognised and under treated. Often family practitioners are not equipped to deal with this mental health disorder and specialist treatment is often the best option.

Detoxification of Drug Use – What Steps are Necessary for Healing

Drug users have one thing on their minds - how and when will they get their next “high”.

Partying too many nights in a row during our college years …. Normal, yes! Staying out with friends and consuming too much alcohol, is tried by many people.

Getting asked to try drugs – now, that is a different animal altogether. Drug addiction is like a ferocious lion, that rears is loud roar constantly throughout the day until you feed it a pill, shot, hit or fix.

Drug users have one thing on their minds – how and when will they get their next “high”.  They fixate on thoughts of feeling euphoric, altering their state of being and the waves come crashing in around them.  Some are running from their past, carrying unnecessary baggage, numbing from tumultuous life situations and ultimately becoming addicted.

Addiction is not just being dependent upon “street drugs”, plenty of Americans become enslaved to prescription drugs, as well.

Users experience pleasurable sensations due to addiction itself or running away from painful life situations, they have not been able to find a solution for.

When users experience withdrawal, the side effects can be painfully excruciating.

Withdrawal Symptoms can Include the Following:

◻Feeling jitters/shaky/unable to control tremors

◻Headaches

◻Insomnia

◻Stress/anxiety/thoughts of suicide

◻Nauseous/flu-like symptoms/cramping in the abdominal area

◻Irritable

◻Sweating – like you are drenched – “more than a normal”

◻Blurred vision

Unfortunately, if users do not get to a detox center or treatment facility, where they will work on safely detoxifying – they could die.  Detoxing your body of harmful toxins is very challenging.  The process can be tricky and lengthy.

Drugs are depressants, just like alcohol and they alter chemicals in our body, increasing our adrenaline and producing erratic states of being.  Drug users are unpredictable and can cause bodily harm to themselves and others.

First step:  you must accept the fact and admit that you are an addict.  If we continue to lie to ourselves, we can’t face the reality of seeking proper treatment.  You must want to change your life and stay clean and sober.

Ouch …. What a major hurdle to step over but if we don’t admit our problem, it will never go away.  We will be running from ourselves for the rest of our lives. Wherever we go, there we are!  Everything becomes a blur, memories are forgotten or very distant and we isolate to hide our addictions.

Trained clinicians and passionate healthcare employees make a significant difference, on the road to recovery

Trained clinicians and passionate healthcare employees make a significant difference, on the road to recovery.  Here at  https://www.pacificbayrecovery.com/ we assist you in navigating successful care of life-altering addition.

Being just a number makes us feel less than, not important or cared for.  Here at Pacific Bay Recovery, we utilize a different approach to healing. You are treated as an individual, not an addict.  Each person that walks through our doors, is designed a different treatment recovery plan that is tailored specifically for them.

We want our patients to feel welcome, a part of instead of apart from and included like family.

We are here to help you succeed on your road to recovery!  We believe in you and will be here every step of the way.

Should you have any additional questions please send us a message https://www.pacificbayrecovery.com/contact/

Undergoing Medical Detoxification

The process of medical detoxification, or medical detox, is the first step in substance dependence and addiction which allows for an affected individual to adjust to a life without alcohol and/or drugs.

The process is performed slowly under the care and supervision of a trained and experienced healthcare professional. This is done to allow patients the opportunity to withdraw from their addictive substances without having to experience too severe withdrawal symptoms.

Withdrawal Symptoms

An important aspect to take note of is that every addiction is based on the individual and every withdrawal experience is different. Not everyone goes through the same withdrawal process and the severity of symptoms will depend on factors such as the type of drug used, the frequency of its use, how long the substance was used for, and if there is any underlying pathology.

The following are possible withdrawal symptoms that may be experienced depending on the substance that is abused:

  • Alcohol – fever, rapid heartbeat, and confusion.
  • Opioids/narcotics – excessive sweating, muscles aches, anxiety, abdominal discomfort, and agitation.
  • Methamphetamine – uncontrollable shaking, dry mouth, sweating, fatigue, and insomnia.
  • Cocaine – malaise, increased appetite, fatigue, and agitation.

Some other withdrawal symptoms that patients may experience can include:

  • Muscle tremors.
  • Depression.
  • Vomiting.
  • Diarrhea.

process is performed slowly under the care and supervision of a trained and experienced healthcare professional

Some patients may stop experiencing these issues after a few days or weeks, while others may end up struggling with symptoms that linger on for months. The period of time one may ultimately experience the withdrawal symptoms may last longer than anticipated without medical support and this can lead to relapsing back into bad habits.

Severe withdrawal symptoms that warrant definite medical intervention and support include:

  • Severe psychological distress.
  • Hallucinations.
  • Seizures or convulsions.

In the event of such issues, a medical detox administrator can ensure the safety of a patient and reduce the chances of a relapse.

How Does Medical Detox Work?

The following steps take place during a medical detoxification:

  • A trained medical practitioner will take charge over the entire withdrawal process starting with a patient’s history, current health status, and substance use history.
  • The patient will be examined and investigated further if required to rule out and manage any acute and/or chronic medical issues. Any fluid and electrolyte imbalances will also be managed here.
  • A custom detox process will be initiated for the patient to minimize the side effects of the withdrawal process as well as encourage a permanent state of recovery.
  • Depending on the substance that the patient is addicted to, tapering off the drug may be required in order to prevent any severe withdrawal effects from developing. This is especially important for substances such as alcohol, benzodiazepines, and methamphetamine.
  • Once the patients have their withdrawal symptoms under control, they will start to take part in other substance rehabilitation services such as psychotherapy and occupational therapy.

Without having to worry about physical and psychological symptoms of the withdrawal process, the patient can then start to focus on their mental health, long-term recovery plan to avoid relapses and to rebuild their lives and relationships with family members and friends.